Towards the Circular Economy

Towards the Circular Economy

 

 

Circular Economy in reuse of

  • Metals
  • Plastics
  • Paper and Paper Board
  • Glass
  • Rubber
  • Wood/Timber/Construction Composites
  • Textiles
  • Organic Waste/Food/Agricultural/Biological

 

 

CIRCULAR ECONOMY: THE NEW NORMAL?

Key points

  • Keeping materials longer in the economy through reuse, re-purposing or recycling could reduce 33 per cent of the carbon dioxide emissions embedded in products.
  • Circularity requires a significant bridge between trade in goods and trade in services.
  • Increased recycling could reduce demand for primary resources, leading to both risks and opportunities in developing countries dependent on the extraction of natural resources.

 

CIRCULAR ECONOMY: THE NEW NORMAL?

Linear production is a familiar cycle. Resources are extracted and transformed into goods and services, sold and used, after which they are scrapped. This model has underpinned the expansion of the global economy since the industrial revolution.

It has linked material prosperity to the extraction of resources, yet has often overlooked the undue pressures placed on the environment and has rarely considered the cost of handling, scrapping and disposing of used materials, some of which are hazardous to human health. As the global population increases, incomes rise and nations strive to eradicate poverty, demand for goods and services will necessarily grow. The aim of achieving Sustainable Development Goal 12 on responsible consumption and production requires changing the linear production model. The concept of a circular economy and practice therefore merits close attention, as it can open new opportunities for trade and job creation, contribute to climate change mitigation and help reduce the costs of cleaning and scrapping in both developed and developing countries.

A circular economy entails markets that give incentives to reusing products, rather than scrapping them and then extracting new resources. In such an economy, all forms of waste, such as clothes, scrap metal and obsolete electronics, are returned to the economy or used more efficiently. This can provide a way to not only protect the environment, but use natural resources more wisely, develop new sectors, create jobs and develop new capabilities.

Each year, 1.3 billion tons of garbage are produced by 3 billion urban residents.1 This is the end point of a linear economic flow that starts with manufacturing, which uses 54 per cent of the world’s delivered energy, especially in energy-intensive industries such as petrochemicals, cement, metals and paper.2 Each year, 322 million tons of plastic, 240 million tons of paper and 59 million tons of aluminium are produced in the world, much of which goes to export markets and is not recycled.3

A rusty container or an obsolete mobile telephone are only two examples of the many products that end up being discarded, along with their transistors, metal structures and complex plastics. Each component requires a great deal of energy, time, land and capital to be produced and, even as the products become obsolete, their components often do not. The potential value of metals and plastics currently lost in electronic waste may be €55 billion annually.4

As the supply of recycled, reused and re-manufactured products increases, such products are maintained for longer in the economy, avoiding their loss to landfills. Food losses could be halved through food- sharing and discounting models that reduce fresh food waste. Access to efficient home appliances could be increased through leasing instead of sales. Organic waste could be recovered or transformed into high-value protein through the production of insect larvae.

Benefits such as these could be gained by both developed and developing countries; the potential economic gains are estimated at over $1 trillion per year in material cost savings.5 Several economies are already exploring circular strategies, including Brazil, China, India, Kenya, the Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Morocco, South Africa, Turkey, Uruguay, VietNam and the European Union.6 India and the European Union stand to gain savings of $624 billion and €320 billion, respectively.7

The effects of increased recycling on global value chains are an important area for research. For example, a circular model for metals implies an increase in the re-purposing, reuse and recycling of such materials. This can transform end points of the value chain, such as junkyards and dumping sites for metals, into new reprocessing hubs that supply metals to markets. This growth trend in recycling markets may be desirable from an environmental perspective, yet could reduce demand for primary resources, requiring an adjustment in employment, logistics and scal structures in countries dependent on the extraction of natural resources.8 At the same time, growth in the recycling, re-purposing and reuse of materials could support the emergence of regional reprocessing and recycling hubs and open new opportunities for the commodities and manufacturing sectors. Greater circularity could reduce the depreciation of physical capital in the economy, increasing overall wealth in societies. The specific benefits that developing countries could obtain by adopting formal circular economy strategies is a new subject for research, and further studies and data are needed.

 

Circularity can change trade patterns and improve the utilization of idle capacity

Circular models could help countries grow with resources already available in their territories. This may imply a reduction in international trade, yet the 140 million people joining the middle class each year guarantee growth in overall trade.9 Such growth may occur not in goods but in services such as access-over-ownership models.10 In addition, increased circularity can change production patterns, improving asset utilization rates and producing value chains based on recycling and re-manufacturing centres close to where products are used. This could lead to fewer transport-related losses, quicker turnarounds between orders and deliveries, lower levels of carbon dioxide emissions and the creation of jobs that cannot be offshored.

Some countries have trade surpluses in physical goods and others in immaterial services. Trade therefore results in a net transfer of materials from one region to another as seen, for example, in trade patterns between China and the United States. The United States imports many goods from China but does not export nearly as many finished goods in return. However, nearly 3,700 containers of recyclables per day are exported to China; in 2016, such exports amounted to 16.2 million tons of scrap metal, paper and plastics worth $5.2 billion.11

 

Key Terms:

  • Circular Economy
  • Cradle to Cradle
  • Closed Supply Chains
  • Industrial Ecology
  • Reverse Ecology
  • Blue Economy
  • Regenerative Design
  • Performance Economy
  • Natural Capitalism
  • Bio-mimicry
  • Doughnut Economics

 

 

From Input to the European Commission from European EPAs about monitoring progress of the transition towards a circular economy in the European Union

circular3

 

 

Circular Economy System Diagram

https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/circular-economy/interactive-diagram

System_diagram_cropped

From INTRODUCTION TO THE CIRCULAR ECONOMY Booklet

circular2

From Towards the Circular Economy: Accelerating the scale-up across global supply chains

circular8

 

Comprehensive Concept of Circular Economy

http://bio-based.eu/graphics/

circular1

From Input to the European Commission from European EPAs about monitoring progress of the transition towards a circular economy in the European Union

Circular4

From Taking the Circular Economy to the City Level

cicular5

Please see my related post:

Resource Flows: Material Flow Accounting (MFA), Life Cycle Analysis (LCA), Input Output Networks and other methods

Stock Flow Consistent Input Output Models (SFCIO)

Stock Flow Consistent Models for Ecological Economics

Jay W. Forrester and System Dynamics

 

Key Sources of Research:

Ellen MacArthur Foundation

https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org

 

 

 

 

INTRODUCTION TO THE CIRCULAR ECONOMY

Circular economy booklet

 Ellen MacArthur Foundation

Click to access 5f046f0a12854e0301e8139fce7cddc7f065.pdf

 

 

 

 

 

TOWARDS THE CIRCULAR ECONOMY

Economic and business rationale for an accelerated transition

Ellen MacArthur Foundation

2013

Volume 1

Click to access Ellen-MacArthur-Foundation-Towards-the-Circular-Economy-vol.1.pdf

 

 

TOWARDS THE CIRCULAR ECONOMY

Opportunities for the consumer goods sector

 

Ellen MacArthur Foundation

2013

Volume 2

https://www.mckinsey.com/~/media/mckinsey/dotcom/client_service/sustainability/pdfs/towards_the_circular_economy.ashx

https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/publications/towards-the-circular-economy-vol-2-opportunities-for-the-consumer-goods-sector

 

 

 

TOWARDS THE CIRCULAR ECONOMY

Accelerating the scale-up across global supply chains

Volume 3

2014

Ellen MacArthur Foundation

Click to access Towards-the-circular-economy-volume-3.pdf

 

 

 

 

 

Towards the Circular Economy: Accelerating the scale-up across global supply chains

World Economic Forum

Prepared in collaboration with the Ellen MacArthur Foundation and McKinsey & Company

January 2014

 

rethinking value chains to boost resource productivity

Click to access 2._zils_v03.pdf

 

 

 

Circular Economy in Cities

Evolving the model for a sustainable urban future

WEF

 

Click to access White_paper_Circular_Economy_in_Cities_report_2018.pdf

Towards a circular economy: A zero waste programme for Europe

DG Environment

Minsk, 8 October 2014

 

Click to access EC-Circular-econonomy.pdf

 

 

 

 

Transitioning IKEA Towards a Circular Economy: A Backcasting Approach

Claudia Szerakowski

Master’s Thesis in Industrial Ecology

 

Click to access 252505.pdf

 

 

 

 

Circular Economy Industry Roundtable:

Towards a Circular Singapore

1st June, 2017

Click to access 170925-ead-summary_(1)_(1).pdf

 

 

 

Sustainable Supply Chain Management and the transition towards a Circular Economy: Evidence and some Applications.

Genovese, Andrea and Acquaye, Adolf and Figueroa, Alejandro and Koh, S.C. Lenny

(2015)

Omega,

https://kar.kent.ac.uk/49202/

 

 

 

Are you ready for the circular economy? The necessity of an integrated approach.

EY

Click to access EY-brochure-cas-are-you-ready-for-the-circular-economy.pdf

 

 

 

Barriers & Drivers towards a Circular Economy

Literature Review A-140315-R-Final

March 2015

 

Click to access e00e8643951aef8adde612123e824493.pdf

 

The Circular Economy Powered by Cradle to Cradle®

 

Click to access The-Circular-Economy-powered-by-Cradle-to-Cradle.pdf

 

 

 

 Towards a Circular Economy

Venkatachalam Anbumozhi Jootae Kim

Click to access ERIA_RPR_FY2014_44.pdf

 

 

 

Circular Economy

European Commission

Click to access Presentation-circular-economy-EU-kommissionen.pdf

 

 

 

CIRCULAR ECONOMY IN CHINA

OPPORTUNITIES FOR COMPANIES

Business Sweden

 

Click to access circular-economy-in-china.-report-v.1.0_final.pdf

 

 

 

SUPPORTING THE CIRCULAR ECONOMY TRANSITION

THE ROLE OF THE FINANCIAL SECTOR IN THE NETHERLANDS

Oliver Wyman

 

Click to access CircularEconomy_print.pdf

 

 

 

Transition towards a circular economy: The case of the Metropole region Amsterdam

Jacqueline Cramer

Ambassador Circular Economy

 

Click to access jacqueline-cramer-lecture-2016.pdf

 

 

 

 

The Circular Economy – a new sustainability paradigm?

Geissdoerfer, Martin1,2†; Savaget, Paulo1; Bocken, Nancy M.P.1,2; Hultink, Erik Jan2

 

https://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/bitstream/handle/1810/261957/The%20Circular%20Economy%20-%20a%20new%20sustainability%20paradigm_accepted%20version.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y

 

 

 

A REVIEW OF THE CIRCULAR ECONOMY AND ITS IMPLEMENTATION

 

Click to access CircularEconomy_webb.pdf

 

SS8: Circular economy and decoupling

https://www.wrforum.org/ss8-circular-economy-and-decoupling/

 

 

 

Input to the European Commission from European EPAs about monitoring progress of the transition towards a circular economy in the European Union

 

May 2017

Click to access PBL-2017-EPA-network-discussion-paper-monitoring-progress-of-the-circular-economy-in-the-EU_2772.pdf

 

 

 

The European Economy: From a Linear to a Circular Economy

Florin Bonciu

 

Click to access RJEA_2014_vol14_no4_art5.pdf

 

 

 

 

THE CIRCULAR ECONOMY AND DEVELOPING COUNTRIES

A DATA ANALYSIS OF THE IMPACT OF A CIRCULAR ECONOMY ON RESOURCE-DEPENDENT DEVELOPING NATIONS

 

Click to access CEO_The%20Circular%20Economy.pdf

 

 

 

The opportunities of a circular economy for Finland

October, 2015

 

Click to access Selvityksia100.pdf

 

 

 

Circular economy

A review of definitions, processes and impacts

 

Click to access 2809-circular-impacts_0.pdf

 

 

 

CIRCULAR ECONOMY IN INDIA: RETHINKING GROWTH FOR LONG-TERM PROSPERITY

Click to access circular-economy-in-india-2-dec-2016.pdf

 

 

 

 

GROWTH WITHIN: A CIRCULAR ECONOMY VISION FOR A COMPETITIVE EUROPE

 

Click to access Circular%20economy%203.pdf

 

 

 

 

Report on State-of-the-Art Research in the Area of the Circular Economy

 

Sylvie Geisendorf

Felicitas Pietrulla ESCP Europe Campus Berlin

 

Click to access report-on-state-of-the-art-research.pdf

 

 

 

A Wider Circle? The Circular Economy in Developing Countries

 

Click to access 2017-12-05-circular-economy-preston-lehne.pdf

 

 

 

 

A safe and just space for humanity

CAN WE LIVE WITHIN THE DOUGHNUT?

Kate Raworth

OXFAM

 

Click to access dp-a-safe-and-just-space-for-humanity-130212-en.pdf

https://www.kateraworth.com

 

 

Doughnut Economics: seven ways to think like a 21st century economist

Kate Raworth

http://www.lse.ac.uk/website-archive/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=3938

 

Taking the Circular Economy to the City Level

Click to access ICLEI_Webinar_Circular_Economy_Intro.pdf

 

 

 

 

 

Mapping the Political Economy of Design

Dr. Joanna Boehnert

Research Fellow
Centre for the Evaluation of Complexity Across the Nexus University of Surrey

 

Click to access RSD6-Mapping-the-Political-Economy-of-Design-Boehnert-6.12.17-Final2.pdf

 

 

 

A circular Economy

SITRA

https://www.sitra.fi/en/topics/a-circular-economy/

 

 

 

Rethinking Sustainability in Light of the EU’s New Circular Economy Policy

JULY 03, 2018
HBR

https://hbr.org/2018/07/rethinking-sustainability-in-light-of-the-eus-new-circular-economy-policy

 

 

 

 RE-CIRCLE

Resource Efficiency & Circular Economy Project

OECD

 

Click to access brochure-recircle-resource-efficiency-and-circular-economy.pdf

 

 

ECONOMICS OF THE CIRCULAR ECONOMY TRANSITION: A CRITICAL REVIEW OF MODELLING APPROACHES –

ENVIRONMENT WORKING PAPER No. 130

by Andrew McCarthy, Rob Dellink, and Ruben Bibas

(OECD)

 

https://www.oecd-ilibrary.org/docserver/af983f9a-en.pdf?expires=1531674000&id=id&accname=guest&checksum=1108F9A93394F591184369F48C2F5D4C

 

 

 

 

COMMUNICATION FROM THE COMMISSION TO THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT, THE COUNCIL, THE EUROPEAN ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL COMMITTEE AND THE COMMITTEE OF THE REGIONS

A European Strategy for Plastics in a Circular Economy

EU

 

Click to access plastics-strategy.pdf

 

 

 

The New Plastics Economy

Rethinking the future of plastics

WEF

 

Click to access WEF_The_New_Plastics_Economy.pdf

 

https://www.mckinsey.com/~/media/mckinsey/business%20functions/sustainability%20and%20resource%20productivity/our%20insights/rethinking%20future%20of%20plastics/the%20new%20plastics%20economy.ashx

 

Click to access NPEC-Hybrid_English_22-11-17_Digital.pdf

 

 

 

SCALING RECYCLED PLASTICS ACROSS INDUSTRIES

MARCH 2017

RESEARCHED BY JOS VLUGTER,
MSC CANDIDATE, STRATEGIC PRODUCT DESIGN, DELFT UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

 

Click to access Scaling-Recycled-Plastics-across-Industries.pdf

 

 

 

 

CIRCULAR ECONOMY: THE NEW NORMAL?

UNCTAD

May 2018

 

Click to access presspb2017d10_en.pdf

 

 

 

 

The circular economy: Moving from theory to practice

McKinsey Center for Business and Environment Special edition,

October 2016

https://www.mckinsey.com/~/media/McKinsey/Business%20Functions/Sustainability%20and%20Resource%20Productivity/Our%20Insights/The%20circular%20economy%20Moving%20from%20theory%20to%20practice/The%20circular%20economy%20Moving%20from%20theory%20to%20practice.ashx

 

 

 

 

Renewable materials in the Circular Economy

April 2018

 

Click to access C296.pdf

 

 

 

A Review of the Circular Economy and its Implementation

Almas Heshmati

Sogang University and IZA

 

Click to access dp9611.pdf

 

 

 

Rethinking finance in Rethinking nance in a circular economy

Financial implications of circular business models

ING

 

Click to access ing-rethinking-finance-in-a-circular-economy-may-2015.pdf

 

 

 

 

 

The Circular Economy in International Trade

UNCTAD

2016

http://unctad.org/en/pages/newsdetails.aspx?OriginalVersionID=1400

 

 

 

 

Circular economy:
a commentary from the perspectives of the natural and social sciences

Click to access EASAC_Circular_Economy_Web.pdf

 

 

 

 

Circular by design

Products in the circular economy

Click to access circular_by_design_-_products_in_the_circular_economy.pdf

 

 

 

GROWTH WITHIN:

A CIRCULAR ECONOMY VISION FOR A COMPETITIVE EUROPE

Ellen MacArthur Foundation

 

Click to access EllenMacArthurFoundation_Growth-Within_July15.pdf

Author: Mayank Chaturvedi

You can contact me using this email mchatur at the rate of AOL.COM. My professional profile is on Linkedin.com.

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