Low Interest Rates and Business Investments : Update August 2017

Low Interest Rates and Business Investments : Update August 2017

 

From  Explaining Low Investment Spending

USINVEST

globalinvest

 

Please see my earlier posts.

Business Investments and Low Interest Rates

Mergers and Acquisitions – Long Term Trends and Waves

The Decline in Long Term Real Interest Rates

Short term Thinking in Investment Decisions of Businesses and Financial Markets

Low Interest Rates and Monetary Policy Effectiveness

Low Interest Rates and Banks’ Profitability : Update July 2017

Low Interest Rates and Banks Profitability: Update – December 2016

 

Since my earlier posts on this subject there has been several new studies published highlighting weakness in business investments as one of the cause of slower economic growth and lower interest rates.

Other significant factors impacting interest rates are demographic changes, and slower economic growth.

I argue that there is mutual (circular) causality in weak business investment, slower economic growth, and lower interest rates which reinforce each other.

 

Decreased competition, increased concentration, corporate savings glut, share buybacks, paying dividends are also identified as factors.

Number of public companies have decreased significantly in USA since 1996 due to M&A activity.   See the data below.

Increased Mergers/Acquisitions, Increased Concentration, Decreased Competition, Decreased Number of Public Companies, Share buybacks, and Dividend Payouts are multiple perspectives of same problem.

 

From The Incredible Shrinking Universe of Stocks

The Causes and Consequences of Fewer U.S. Equities

USNUMUSSTAT

 

Key sources of Research:

The Low Level of Global Real Interest Rates

Remarks by
Stanley Fischer
Vice Chairman
Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System

at the
Conference to Celebrate Arminio Fraga’s 60 Years
Casa das Garcas, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

July 31, 2017

The Low Level of Global Real Interest Rates

 

 

INVESTMENT-LESS GROWTH: AN EMPIRICAL INVESTIGATION

German Gutierrez Thomas Philippon

Working Paper 22897

NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138

December 2016

 

INVESTMENT-LESS GROWTH: AN EMPIRICAL INVESTIGATION

 

 

Explaining Low Investment Spending

The NBER Digest
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

February 2017

Explaining Low Investment Spending

 

 

The Secular Stagnation of Investment?

Callum Jones and Thomas Philippon

December 2016

 

The Secular Stagnation of Investment?

 

 

Is there an investment gap in advanced economies? If so, why?

By Robin Dottling, German Gutierrez and Thomas Philippon

 

Is there an investment gap in advanced economies? If so, why?

 

 

The Disappointing Recovery of Output after 2009

JOHN G. FERNALD ROBERT E. HALL

JAMES H. STOCK MARK W. WATSON

May 2, 2017

The Disappointing Recovery of Output after 2009

 

 

Declining Competition and Investment in the U.S.

German Gutierrez and Thomas Philippon

NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

July 2017

 

Declining Competition and Investment in the U.S

 

 

Real Interest Rates Over the Long Run : Decline and convergence since the 1980s

Kei-Mu Yi   Jing Zhang

ECONOMIC POLICY PAPER 16-10 SEPTEMBER 2016

FEDERAL RESERVE BANK of MINNEAPOLIS

Real Interest Rates over the Long Run Decline and convergence since the 1980s, due significantly to factors causing lower investment demand

 

 

Understanding global trends in long-run real interest rates

Kei-Mu Yi and Jing Zhang

Economic Perspectives, Vol. 41, No. 2, 2017
Chicago Fed Reserve Bank

 

Understanding Global Trends in Long-run Real Interest Rates

 

 

Weakness in Investment Growth: Causes, Implications and Policy Responses

CAMA Working Paper 19/2017 March 2017

M. Ayhan Kose

Franziska Ohnsorge

Lei Sandy Ye

Ergys Islamaj

 

Weakness in Investment Growth: Causes, Implications and Policy Responses

 

 

Are US Industries Becoming More Concentrated?

Gustavo Grullon, Yelena Larkin and Roni Michaely

October 2016

 

Are US Industries Becoming More Concentrated?

 

 

Why Is Global Business Investment So Weak? Some Insights from Advanced Economies

 

Robert Fay, Justin-Damien Guénette, Martin Leduc and Louis Morel,

International Economic Analysis Department

Bank of Canada Review Spring 2017

 

Why Is Global Business Investment So Weak? Some Insights from Advanced Economies

 

 

What Is Behind the Weakness in Global Investment?

by Maxime Leboeuf and Bob Fay

2016

Bank of Canada

 

What Is Behind the Weakness in Global Investment?

 A Structural Interpretation of the Recent Weakness in Business Investment

by Russell Barnett and Rhys Mendes

 The Corporate Saving Glut in the Aftermath of the Global Financial Crisis

 

Gruber, Joseph W., and Steven B. Kamin

International Finance Discussion Papers
Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System
Number 1150 October 2015

 

The Corporate Saving Glut in the Aftermath of the Global Financial Crisis

 

 

The Incredible Shrinking Universe of Stocks

The Causes and Consequences of Fewer U.S. Equities

March 22, 2017

GLOBAL FINANCIAL STRATEGIES

http://www.credit-suisse.com

 

The Incredible Shrinking Universe of Stocks The Causes and Consequences of Fewer U.S. Equities

 

 

They Just Get Bigger: How Corporate Mergers Strangle the Economy

Jordan Brennan

2017 February 19

They Just Get Bigger: How Corporate Mergers Strangle the Economy

 

 

Rising Corporate Concentration, Declining Trade Union Power, and the Growing Income Gap: American Prosperity in Historical Perspective

Jordan Brennan

March 2016

 

Rising Corporate Concentration, Declining Trade Union Power, and the Growing Income Gap: American Prosperity in Historical Perspective

Low Interest Rates and Monetary Policy Effectiveness

Low Interest Rates and Monetary Policy Effectiveness

 

World economy is stuck in low interest rates environment.   Euro area, japan have even negative interest rates.  US Fed Reserve since December 2016 has started raising interest rates.

Attempts by Central Banks have not been effective in increasing economic growth.  Many Economists now are presenting counter intuitive reasons for low growth.

 

Please see my earlier related posts.

Business Investments and Low Interest Rates

Mergers and Acquisitions – Long Term Trends and Waves

 

Since 2016, there are several new studies published exploring effectiveness of monetary policy in low interest rates environment.

 

Is monetary policy less effective when interest rates are persistently low?

by Claudio Borio and Boris Hofmann

April 2017

Is Monetary Policy Less Effective When Interest Rates are Persistently Low?

 

In March 2017, Brookings Institution published the following study by the economists of the US Federal Reserve.

Monetary policy in a low interest rate world

 

Fed Reserve of Chicago published speech given by Charles Evans in 2016.

Monetary Policy in a Lower Interest Rate Environment

 

Lecture by Vítor Constâncio, Vice-President of the ECB, Macroeconomics Symposium at Utrecht School of Economics, 15 June 2016

The challenge of low real interest rates for monetary policy

 

Journal of Policy Modeling published a paper by Ken Rogoff.  Paper was presented at American Economic Association, 2017.

Monetary policy in a low interest rate world

 

Eight BIS CCA Research Conference on “Low interest rates, monetary policy and international spillovers”, hosted by the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, Washington DC, 25-26 May 2017

Low interest rates, monetary policy and international spillovers

 

Economist Magazine published an article on views of Bill Gross and others.

November 2015

Do ultra-low interest rates really damage growth?

 

Bloomberg Business Week published an article describing views of Charles Calomiris and others.

June 2017

Is the World Overdoing Low Interest Rates?

 

Claudio Borio and Boris Hofmann

The Paper was prepared for the Reserve Bank of Australia conference
“Monetary Policy and Financial Stability in a World of Low Interest Rates”,

16-17 March 2017, Sydney

Is monetary policy less effective when interest rates are persistently low?

 

Monetary policy and bank lending in a low interest rate environment: diminishing effectiveness?

Claudio Borio and Leonardo Gambacorta

February 2017

Monetary policy and bank lending in a low interest rate environment: diminishing effectiveness?

 

Negative Interest Rate Policy (NIRP):
Implications for Monetary Transmission and Bank Profitability in the Euro Area

Prepared by Andreas (Andy) Jobst and Huidan Lin

IMF

August 2016

Negative Interest Rate Policy (NIRP): Implications for Monetary Transmission and Bank Profitability in the Euro Area

 

James Bullard, President and CEO of Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

March 24, 2009

The Henry Thornton Lecture, Cass Business School, London

Effective Monetary Policy in a Low Interest Rate Environment

 

Federal Reserve Bank of New York

Monetary Policy, Financial Conditions, and Financial Stability

Tobias Adrian
Nellie Liang

Monetary Policy, Financial Conditions, and Financial Stability

 

Monetary policy, the financial cycle and ultra-low interest rates

Mikael Juselius of Bank of Finland

DNB Workshop on “Estimating and Interpreting Financial Cycles”

Amsterdam, 2 September 2016

Monetary policy, the financial cycle and ultra-low interest rates

BIS Paper

Monetary policy, the financial cycle and ultra-low interest rates

 

The dynamics of real interest rates, monetary policy and its limits

Philippe d’Arvisenet

May 2016

The dynamics of real interest rates, monetary policy and its limits

 

Output Gaps and Monetary Policy at Low Interest Rates

By Roberto M. Billi

Output Gaps and Monetary Policy at Low Interest Rates

 

The insensitivity of investment to interest rates: Evidence from a survey of CFOs

Steve A. Sharpe and Gustavo A. Suarez

2014-02

The insensitivity of investment to interest rates: Evidence from a survey of CFOs

 

Does Prolonged Monetary Policy Easing Increase Financial Vulnerability?

Prepared by Stephen Cecchetti, Tommaso Mancini-Griffoli, and Machiko Narita

February 2017

Does Prolonged Monetary Policy Easing Increase Financial Vulnerability?

 

The Microeconomic Perils of Monetary Policy Experiments

Charles W. Calomiris

Cato Institute

The Microeconomic Perils of Monetary Policy Experiments

 

Why Have the Fed’s Policies Failed to Stimulate the Economy?

Mickey D. Levy

Cato Institute

Why Have the Fed’s Policies Failed to Stimulate the Economy?

Hierarchy Theory in Biology, Ecology and Evolution

Hierarchy Theory in Biology, Ecology and Evolution

 

I have always been intrigued by multi-level thinking whether it is in organizations, biology, ecology, and evolutionary theory.

  • Plant – Division – Corporate – Industry – Macro-economy
  • Molecules – Organelles – Cells – Tissue – Organs – Whole body
  • Organism – Populations – Communities – Ecosystem –  Bio-Sphere

 

How does human body forms from Molecules?  Is it all evolutionary?  or is there a role for Vitalism?

How to integrate decision making in organizations at multi levels?  From Corporate level to Plant Level.

How does an Individual fits in Groups, Communities, Society, and Ecosystem?

What is the role of fractals thinking in Evolutionary Biology?

 

A SUMMARY OF THE PRINCIPLES OF HIERARCHY THEORY

The Hierarchy theory is a dialect of general systems theory. It has emerged as part of a movement toward a general science of complexity. Rooted in the work of economist, Herbert Simon, chemist, Ilya Prigogine, and psychologist, Jean Piaget, hierarchy theory focuses upon levels of organization and issues of scale. There is significant emphasis upon the observer in the system.

Hierarchies occur in social systems, biological structures, and in the biological taxonomies. Since scholars and laypersons use hierarchy and hierarchical concepts commonly, it would seem reasonable to have a theory of hierarchies. Hierarchy theory uses a relatively small set of principles to keep track of the complex structure and a behavior of systems with multiple levels. A set of definitions and principles follows immediately:

Hierarchy: in mathematical terms, it is a partially ordered set. In less austere terms, a hierarchy is a collection of parts with ordered asymmetric relationships inside a whole. That is to say, upper levels are above lower levels, and the relationship upwards is asymmetric with the relationships downwards.

Hierarchical levels: levels are populated by entities whose properties characterize the level in question. A given entity may belong to any number of levels, depending on the criteria used to link levels above and below. For example, an individual human being may be a member of the level i) human, ii) primate, iii) organism or iv) host of a parasite, depending on the relationship of the level in question to those above and below.

Level of organization: this type of level fits into its hierarchy by virtue of set of definitions that lock the level in question to those above and below. For example, a biological population level is an aggregate of entities from the organism level of organization, but it is only so by definition. There is no particular scale involved in the population level of organization, in that some organisms are larger than some populations, as in the case of skin parasites.

Level of observation: this type of level fits into its hierarchy by virtue of relative scaling considerations. For example, the host of a skin parasite represents the context for the population of parasites; it is a landscape, even though the host may be seen as belonging to a level of organization, organism, that is lower than the collection of parasites, a population.

The criterion for observation: when a system is observed, there are two separate considerations. One is the spatiotemporal scale at which the observations are made. The other is the criterion for observation, which defines the system in the foreground away from all the rest in the background. The criterion for observation uses the types of parts and their relationships to each other to characterize the system in the foreground. If criteria for observation are linked together in an asymmetric fashion, then the criteria lead to levels of organization. Otherwise, criteria for observation merely generate isolated classes.

The ordering of levels: there are several criteria whereby other levels reside above lower levels. These criteria often run in parallel, but sometimes only one or a few of them apply. Upper levels are above lower levels by virtue of: 1) being the context of, 2) offering constraint to, 3) behaving more slowly at a lower frequency than, 4) being populated by entities with greater integrity and higher bond strength than, and 5), containing and being made of – lower levels.

Nested and non-nested hierarchies: nested hierarchies involve levels which consist of, and contain, lower levels. Non-nested hierarchies are more general in that the requirement of containment of lower levels is relaxed. For example, an army consists of a collection of soldiers and is made up of them. Thus an army is a nested hierarchy. On the other hand, the general at the top of a military command does not consist of his soldiers and so the military command is a non-nested hierarchy with regard to the soldiers in the army. Pecking orders and a food chains are also non-nested hierarchies.

Duality in hierarchies: the dualism in hierarchies appears to come from a set of complementarities that line up with: observer-observed, process-structure, rate-dependent versus rate-independent, and part-whole. Arthur Koestler in his “Ghost in The Machine” referred to the notion of holon, which means an entity in a hierarchy that is at once a whole and at the same time a part. Thus a holon at once operates as a quasi-autonomous whole that integrates its parts, while working to integrate itself into an upper level purpose or role. The lower level answers the question “How?” and the upper level answers the question, “So what?”

Constraint versus possibilities: when one looks at a system there are two separate reasons behind what one sees. First, it is not possible to see something if the parts of the system cannot do what is required of them to achieve the arrangement in the whole. These are the limits of physical possibility. The limits of possibility come from lower levels in the hierarchy. The second entirely separate reason for what one sees is to do with what is allowed by the upper level constraints. An example here would be that mammals have five digits. There is no physical reason for mammals having five digits on their hands and feet, because it comes not from physical limits, but from the constraints of having a mammal heritage. Any number of the digits is possible within the physical limits, but in mammals only five digits are allowed by the biological constraints. Constraints come from above, while the limits as to what is possible come from below. The concept of hierarchy becomes confused unless one makes the distinction between limits from below and limits from above. The distinction between mechanisms below and purposes above turn on the issue of constraint versus possibility. Forget the distinction, and biology becomes pointlessly confused, impossibly complicated chemistry, while chemistry becomes unwieldy physics.

Complexity and self-simplification: Howard Pattee has identified that as a system becomes more elaborately hierarchical its behavior becomes simple. The reason is that, with the emergence of intermediate levels, the lowest level entities become constrained to be far from equilibrium. As a result, the lowest level entities lose degrees of freedom and are held against the upper level constraint to give constant behavior. Deep hierarchical structure indicates elaborate organization, and deep hierarchies are often considered as complex systems by virtue of hierarchical depth.

Complexity versus complicatedness: a hierarchical structure with a large number of lowest level entities, but with simple organization, offers a low flat hierarchy that is complicated rather than complex. The behavior of structurally complicated systems is behaviorally elaborate and so complicated, whereas the behavior of deep hierarchically complex systems is simple.

Hierarchy theory is as much as anything a theory of observation. It has been significantly operationalized in ecology, but has been applied relatively infrequently outside that science. There is a negative reaction to hierarchy theory in the social sciences, by virtue of implications of rigid autocratic systems or authority. When applied in a more general fashion, even liberal and non-authoritarian systems can be described effectively in hierarchical terms. There is a politically correct set of labels that avoid the word hierarchy, but they unnecessarily introduce jargon into a field that has enough special vocabulary as it is.

A SHORT ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY OF HIERARCHY THEORY.

This bibliography is in chronological order, so that the reader can identify the early classics as opposed to the later refinements. If you must choose just one book to read, turn to the last reference in this bibliography, Ahl and Allen, 1996. Simon, H.. A. 1962. The architecture of complexity. Proceedings of the American philosophical society 106: 467-82. This is the foundation paper of hierarchy theory originating from an economist. It was a re-published in “Sciences of the Artificial” by Simon. It introduces the idea of near-decomposability. If systems were completely decomposable, then there would be no emergent whole, because the parts would exist only separately. The “near” in near-decomposable allows the upper level to emerge from the fact that the parts anre not completely separate.

Koestler, Arthur. 1967. The ghost in the machine. Macmillan, New York. This is a long hard look at human social structure in hierarchical terms. The notion of holon first occurs in this work. This is a classic work, but is easily accessible to the lay public.

Whyte, L.. L.., A. G. Wilson and D. Wilson (eds.). 1969. Hierarchical structures. American Elsevier, New York. This is a classic collection of early scholarly works by some of the founders of hierarchical thinking.

Pattee, H.. H. (ed.) 1973. Hierarchy theory: the challenge or complex systems. Braziller, New York. This edited volume has some classic articles by Pattee, Simon and others.

Allen, T. F. H. and T. B. Starr. 1982. Hierarchy: perspectives for ecological complexity. University Chicago Press. This book has a significant ecological component but is much more generally about hierarchical structure. It is abstract and a somewhat technical treatment but has been the foundation work for the application of hierarchy theory in ecology and complex systems theory at large.

Salthe, S. 1985. Evolving Hierarchical Systems: their structure and representation. Columbia University Press, New York. This book has a strong structural bias, in contrast to the process oriented approach of Allen and the other ecologists in this bibliography. Salthe introduces the notion of the Triadic, where there is a focus on 1) the system as both a whole above the levels below and 2) a part belonging to another level above, 3) not forgetting the level of the structure itself in between. While much biological hierarchy theory takes an anti-realist point view, or is at least reality-agnostic, wherein the ultimate reality of hierarchical arrangement is left moot, Salthe’s version of hierarchy theory is concerned with the ultimate reality of structure. The anti-realist view of structure is that it is imposed by the observer, and may or may not correspond to any ultimate reality. If structure does correspond to ultimate, external reality, we could never know that to be so. Salthe’s logic is consistent but always takes a structural and ontological position.

O’Neill, R. V., D. DeAngelis, J. Waide and T. F. H. Allen. 1986. A hierarchical concept of ecosystems. Princeton University Press. This is a distinctly ecological application of hierarchy theory, making the critical distinction between process functional ecosystem approaches as opposed to population and community relationships. It is an application of hierarchy theory to ecosystem analysis.

Allen T. F. H. and T. Hoekstra. 1992. Toward a unified ecology. Columbia University Press. This book turns on hierarchy theory, but is principally a book about ecology. It goes beyond the O’Neill et al book, in that it makes the distinction between many types of ecology (landscape, ecosystem, community, organism, population, and biomes) on the one hand, and scale of ecology on the other hand. It ends with practical applications of hierarchy theory and ecological management.

Ahl, V. and T. F. H. Allen. 1996. Hierarchy theory, a vision, vocabulary and epistemology. Columbia University Press. This slim a volume is an interdisciplinary account of a hierarchy theory, and represents the shallow end of the pool. It is the primer version of Allen and Starr 1982. It is full of graphical images to ease the reader into a hierarchical perspective. It makes the distinction between levels of organization and levels of observation. It takes a moderate anti-realist point of view, wherein there may be an external reality, but it is not relevant to the discourse. We only have access to experience, which must of necessity involve observer values and subjectivity. There are examples from a wide discussion of many disciplines. Included are examples from psychology, ecology, the law, political systems and philosophy. It makes reference to the global and technological problems facing humanity, and offers hierarchy theory as one tool in the struggle. The summary of hierarchy theory in the opening paragraphs above comes from this book.

This summary was compiled by

Timothy F. Allen, Professor of Botany,
University of Wisconsin Madison,
Madison Wisconsin 53706 — 1381.
Email – tfallen@facstaff.wisc.edu

 

 

Key People:

  • James Grier Miller
  • Howard Pattee
  • Stanley Salthe
  • T F Allen
  • Herbert Simon
  • NILES ELDREDGE
  • CS Holling

 

 

Key Sources of Research:

 

A SUMMARY OF THE PRINCIPLES OF HIERARCHY THEORY

T Allen

http://www.isss.org/hierarchy.htm

http://www.botany.wisc.edu/allenlab/AllenLab/Hierarchy.html

 

 

Hierarchy Theory

Paweł Leśniewski

 

http://www.uni-kiel.de/ecology/users/fmueller/salzau2006/ea_presentations/Data/2006-06-28_-_Hierarchy_Theory.pdf

 

 

Summary of the Principles of Hierarchy Theory

S.N. Salthe

 

http://www.nbi.dk/~natphil/salthe/Summary_of_the_Principles_o.pdf

 

 

HOWARD PATTEE’S THEORETICAL BIOLOGY:

A RADICAL EPISTEMOLOGICAL STANCE TO APPROACH LIFE, EVOLUTION ANDCOMPLEXITY.

Jon Umerez

 

http://www.informatics.indiana.edu/rocha/publications/pattee/umerez.pdf

 

 

 

Hierarchy Theory as the Formal Basis of Evolutionary Theory

 

http://www.bbk.ac.uk/tpru/StephenWood/Publications/HierarchyTheoryastheFormalBasisofEvolutionaryTheory.pdf

 

 

The Concept of Levels of Organization in the Biological Sciences

 

PhD Thesis Submitted August 2014 Revised June 2015

Daniel Stephen Brooks

 

http://d-nb.info/1082033960/34

 

 

A spatially explicit hierarchical approach to modeling complex ecological systems: theory and applications

Jianguo Wu , John L. David

 

http://leml.asu.edu/jingle/Web_Pages/Wu_Pubs/PDF_Files/Wu_David_2002.PDF

 

 

What is the Hierarchy Theory of Evolution?

 

http://hierarchygroup.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/What-Is-The-Hierarchy-Theory.pdf

 

 

HIERARCHICAL ORGANIZATION OF ECOSYSTEMS

Jackson R. Webster

 

http://coweeta.uga.edu/publications/274.pdf

 

 

Ecological hierarchies and self-organisation – Pattern analysis, modelling and process integration across scales

Hauke Reutera,, Fred Jopp, José M. Blanco-Morenod, Christian Damgaarde, Yiannis Matsinosf, Donald L. DeAngelis

 

http://izt.ciens.ucv.ve/ecologia/Archivos/ECO_POB%202010/ECOPO1_2010/Reuter_etal_BAAE%202010.pdf

 

 

Levels of organization in biology: on the nature and nomenclature of ecology’s fourth level

William Z. Lidicker, Jr

 

http://www.uff.br/ecosed/Artigo4.pdf

 

 

Chapter 24

Hierarchy Theory: An Overview

Jianguo Wu

 

http://izt.ciens.ucv.ve/ecologia/Archivos/ECO_POB%202016/ECOPO7_2016/Jorgensen%20et%20al%202016.pdf

 

 

Heterarchies: Reconciling Networks and Hierarchies

Graeme S. Cumming

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/303508940_Heterarchies_Reconciling_Networks_and_Hierarchies

 

 

Evolutionary Theory

A HIERARCHICAL PERSPECTIVE

EDITED BY NILES ELDREDGE, TELMO PIEVANI, EMANUELE SERRELLI, AND ILYA TEMKIN

 

 

Holons, creaons, genons, environs, in hierarchy theory: Where we have gone

Timothy Allen, Mario Giampietro

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0304380014002993

 

 

The Evolutionary Foundations of Hierarchy: Status, Dominance, Prestige, and Leadership

Mark van Vugt & Joshua M. Tybur

http://www.professormarkvanvugt.com/images/files/Handbook_of_Evolutionary_Psychologymvv2014rev.pdf

 

 

The Microfoundations of Macroeconomics: An Evolutionary Perspective

Jeroen C.J.M. van den Bergh

John M. Gowdy

 

https://papers.tinbergen.nl/00021.pdf

 

 

Understanding the complexity of Economic, Ecological, and Social Systems

C S Holling

http://www.esf.edu/cue/documents/Holling_Complexity-EconEcol-SocialSys_2001.pdf

 

 

Hierarchical Structures

Stanley N. Salthe

 

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Salthe_Stanley/publication/257522907_Hierarchical_Structures/links/5768411408ae7f0756a2248c.pdf

 

 

Two Frameworks for Complexity Generation in Biological Systems

Stanley N. Salthe

 

http://www.nbi.dk/natphil/salthe/A-life_Conf_paper_Word.pdf

http://www.nbi.dk/~natphil/salthe/_publ_classified_by_topic.pdf

 

 

Spatial scaling in ecology

J. A. WIENS

 

http://www.functionalecology.org/SpringboardWebApp/userfiles/fec/file/Spatial%20scaling%20in%20ecology%20v3%20n4.pdf

 

 

The Spirit of Evolution

by Roger Walsh

An overview of Ken Wilber’s book Sex, Ecology, Spirituality: The Spirit of Evolution (Shambhala, 1995).

http://cogweb.ucla.edu/CogSci/Walsh_on_Wilber_95.html

Bank of Finland’s Payment And Settlement System Simulator (BoF-PSS2)

Bank of Finland’s Payment And Settlement System Simulator (BoF-PSS2)

 

From Payment and Settlement System Simulator

BOF-PSS2

The Bank of Finland provides a simulator called BoF-PSS2 for replicating payment and securities settlement systems. The simulator is adaptable for modelling multisystem setups that can be a combination of payment, securities settlement systems and CCP’s. The simulator is known to be unique and the first of its kind. Since its launch in 2002 it has been distributed to more than 90 countries and has contributed to numerous studies and research papers.

The simulator can be used to fulfill some of the regulatory requirements stated in the PFMI’s and BCBS requirements such as identifying the liquidity risks inpayment systems. Here under are topics the simulator can be used for:

  • Settlement, liquidity and credit risks in FMI’s
  • Systemic Risks and Counterparty risks in FMI’s
  • Identification of critical counterparts
  • Policy change impact evaluation
  • Network analysis
  • Liquidity dependency analysis
  • Relationship analysis of Monetary policy and liquidity needs for settlement of payments
  • Evaluation of sufficiency of liquidity buffers and margins
  • System merger effects on liquidity needs
  • System performance benchmarking
  • Netting algorithm testing and development
  • System development and prototyping

In comparison to static calculations of indicators, the simulation results naturally incorporate network (or systemic) effects rising from the payments flows and the technical properties of the infrastructures themselves. The results obtained from simulations are directly interpretable and have a self-evident meaning which is not always the case with all indicators. The results can directly be used for risk management purposes for example when evaluating the sufficiency of liquidity buffers and margins. Computer simulations take advantage of using the available information in full without losing micro-level information due to indicator aggregations.

The simulator is freely available for research purposes, and has already been introduced in numerous countries. It is possible to tailor and adapt the simulator to specific payment systems. Several adaptations of the simulator have already been made, eg. for TARGET2. The simulator team provides trainings, consultation and tailored adaptations which are priced for cost recovery. The training course aims at providing necessary skills for efficient use of BoF-PSS2 with hands on computer class exercises. It also presents numerous examples from real studies where the tool has been used. For more details see the training course outline. Minimum attendance to the session is four participants.

Basically, trainings are organised upon demand and it is also possible to order a training course to be held onsite outside the proposed dates.

 

From Payment and Settlement System Simulator / Product Page

product_en_144ppi

From Payment and Settlement System Simulator / Documentation page

The Bank of Finland Payment and Settlement System Simulator, version 2 (BoF-PSS2), is a powerful tool for payment and securities settlement system simulations. The simulator supports multiple system structures and various settlement models.

The simulator is designed for analysing liquidity needs and risks in payment and settlement systems. Special situations, often difficult or impossible to test in a real environment, can be readily simulated with BoF-PSS2. Thus, users can study how behavioral patterns and changes in policy and conventions impact the payment and settlement systems and participants. The efficiency of gridlock-resolution and liquidity-saving measures can be analyzed as well.

The application is divided into three sub-systems:

  • Input sub-system for preparing and defining the input data,
  • Execution sub-system for running simulations,
  • Output sub-system for basic analyses of simulation results.

Different settlement logics are implemented into separate algorithms. To replicate specific systems, appropriate algorithms must be selected with appropriate parameters. Different algorithm combinations can be used to replicate a large number of current and potential settlement conventions and structures. Real-time gross settlement systems (RTGS), continuous net settlement systems (CNS), deferred net settlement systems (DNS) and hybrid systems can be implemented with the simulator as well as securities settlement and multicurrency systems. Inter-system connections and bridges make it possible to define multi- system environments consisting of various types of interdependent systems. E.g. it is possible to replicate the interaction of RTGS and securities settlement systems.

Advanced users of BoF-PSS2 can define and build their own user modules/algorithms and expand the basic features of the simulator to analyse new types of settlement processes. It is also possible to implement agent based modeling by adding algorithms replicating the participants’ behavior and decision making to control and alter the flow of submitted transactions. As a later addition, the simulator also has a network analysis module for generating networks and network indicators from either input data or results of simulations.

BoF-PSS2 has an easy to use graphical user interface. It is also possible to automate the use of the simulator via its command line interface (CLI).

 

From Payment and Settlement System Simulator / Product Page

TARGET2 SIMULATOR

A separate TARGET2 simulator version of BoF-PSS2 has been developed and delivered for the European System of Central Banks. It is based on the same basic software architechture and features of BoF-PSS2. Additional features are implemented as separate algorithm modules which replicate the proprietary algorithms of actual TARGET2 system. It is used by Eurosystem for quantitative analyses and numerical simulations of TARGET2.

TARGET2 simulator has been jointly delivered by Suomen Pankki (Bank of Finland) and the 3CB (Banca d’Italia, Deutsche Bundesbank, Banque de France) based on a decision of ECB Governing Council.

 

 

Key Terms

  • Liquidity Simulator
  • Payment System
  • Risk Management
  • Financial Stability
  • Cascades of Failures
  • Congestions and Delays
  • Financial Market Infrastructures
  • Payment Networks
  • Contagion
  • RTGS
  • Simulation Analysis
  • TARGET2
  • Intraday Payments

 

Key People

  • Harry Leinonen
  • Tatu Laine
  • Matti Hellqvist
  • Kimmo Soramäki

 

 

Key Sources of Research:

 

Payment and Settlement System Simulator – A tool for analysis of liquidity, risk and efficiency

Bank of Finland Payment and Settlement Simulator

2006

 

https://www.suomenpankki.fi/globalassets/en/financial-stability/payment-and-settelement-system-simulator/events/2006_11a_hl.pdf

 

 

BoF-PSS2 Technical structure and simulation features

Harry Leinonen

https://www.suomenpankki.fi/globalassets/en/financial-stability/payment-and-settelement-system-simulator/events/20031519seminarpresentationleinonen2.pdf

 

 

Payment and Settlement System Simulator

https://www.suomenpankki.fi/en/financial-stability/bof-pss2-simulator/

https://www.suomenpankki.fi/en/financial-stability/bof-pss2-simulator/product/

https://www.suomenpankki.fi/en/financial-stability/bof-pss2-simulator/events/

 

 

Publications

https://www.suomenpankki.fi/en/financial-stability/bof-pss2-simulator/publications/

 

 

Quantitative analysis of financial market infrastructures: further perspectives on financial stability

E50

https://helda.helsinki.fi/bof/handle/123456789/13990

 

 

Diagnostics for the financial markets : computational studies of payment system : Simulator Seminar Proceedings 2009-2011

E45

https://helda.helsinki.fi/bof/handle/123456789/9381

 

 

Simulation analyses and stress testing of payment networks

E42

https://helda.helsinki.fi/bof/handle/123456789/9369

 

 

Simulation studies of liquidity needs, risks and efficiency in payment networks : Proceedings from the Bank of Finland Payment and Settlement System Seminars 2005-2006

E39

https://helda.helsinki.fi/bof/handle/123456789/9370

 

 

Liquidity, risks and speed in payment and settlement systems : a simulation approach

E31

https://helda.helsinki.fi/bof/handle/123456789/9355

 

 

Simulation Analysis and Tools for the Oversight of Payment Systems

 

http://www.cemla.org/actividades/2012/2012-12-payments/2012-12-vigilanciasistemasdepago-10.pdf

 

 

Utilizing the BoF simulator in quantitative FMI analysis

Tatu Laine

Banco de México

15.10.2014

 

http://www.banxico.org.mx/publicaciones-y-discursos/publicaciones/seminarios/banco-de-mexico_-the-evolving-landscape-of-payment/%7B15D9D1D3-D455-1E98-6FA6-AFB3B30C4ACB%7D.pdf

 

 

TARGET2 Simulator

https://www.banque-france.fr/sites/default/files/media/2016/11/07/target_newsletter_7_2013.pdf

 

 

Intraday patterns and timing of TARGET2 interbank payments

Marco Massarenti

Silvio Petriconi

Johannes Lindner

 

https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/7177/0b5a0eb557b478843891449221c6ed2e7502.pdf

 

 

Communities and driver nodes in the TARGET2 payment system

Marco Galbiatiy, Lucian Stanciu-Vizeteuz

June 17, 2015

 

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Marco_Galbiati/publication/279511583_Communities_and_driver_nodes_in_the_TARGET2_payment_system/links/5593d39c08ae1e9cb42a1904.pdf

 

 

Payment Delays and Contagion

Ben Craig† Dilyara Salakhova‡ Martin Saldias§

November 14, 2014

http://www.systemic-risk-hub.org/papers/bibliography/CraigSalakhovaSaldias_2014_preview.pdf

 

 

Federal Reserve Bank of New York Economic Policy Review

September 2008 Volume 14 Number 2

Special Issue: The Economics of Payments

 

https://www.newyorkfed.org/medialibrary/media/research/epr/2008/EPRvol14n2.pdf

 

 

Contagion in Payment and Settlement Systems

 

Matti Hellqvist

2006

 

https://www.imf.org/external/np/seminars/eng/2006/stress/pdf/mh.pdf

 

 

Applications of BoF-PSS2 simulator and how to use it in agent based models

 

http://terna.to.it/ABM-BaF09/presentations/Hellqvist(presentation)_ABM-BaF09.pdf

 

 

Simulation and Analysis of Cascading Failure in Critical Infrastructure

Robert Glass, Walt Beyeler, Kimmo Soramäki, MortenBech and Jeffrey Arnold

Sandia National Laboratories, European Central Bank,  Federal Reserve Bank of New York

https://www.suomenpankki.fi/globalassets/en/financial-stability/payment-and-settelement-system-simulator/events/07-glass_pres.pdf

 

 

Simulation analysis of payment systems

 

Kimmo Soramäki

2011

http://www.cemla.org/actividades/2011/2011-11-vigilancia/2011-11-vigilancia-07.pdf

 

 

Simulating interbank payment and securities settlement mechanisms with the BoF-PSS2 simulator

Harry Leinonen

Kimmo Soramäki

 

2003

 

https://www.suomenpankki.fi/globalassets/en/rahoitusjarjestelman_vakaus/bof-pss2/documentation/bof_dp_2303.pdf

 

Global Financial Safety Net: Regional Reserve Pools and Currency Swap Networks of Central Banks

Global Financial Safety Net: Regional Reserve Pools and Currency Swap Networks of Central Banks

 

You can read this post from two perspectives

  • Geo Strategic (International Financial and Economic Architecture)
  • Financial and Economic stability / Macro-prudential Policy

 

Recent Financial Crisis has exposed the fact that global financial liquidity can be in shortage.  Since US Dollar is the global currency and is used in more that 40 percent of all financial transactions globally.

Asian Countries faced dollar shortage during 1997-1998 asian financial crisis.  Recent Global Financial crisis caused dollar shortage in advanced countries.  US Central Bank Federal Reserve responded by setting up currency swap lines with central banks of other countries.  These swap lines were made permanent in 2013.

After Asian financial crisis in 1997, many countries in developing world started accumulating FX reserves.  There was also a swap agreement (known as Chiang Mai Initiative) which was set up between ASEAN countries in south east Asia.

Nations also go to IMF to get conditional financing which they do not like to do.  New Trend is toward regional pooling of financial resources.  Latest example is BRICS CRA.

Even advanced economies such as EU have established European Stability Mechanism (ESM).

Chiang Mai Initiative has been revamped as Chiang Mai Initiative Multilateralism (CMIM).

 

Financial and Economic Stability / Macro Prudential Policy

A. Reserve Pools

  • Chiang Mai Initiative (CMI)
  • Chiang Mai Initiative Multi-Lateralism (CMIM)
  • BRICS Contingent Reserve Arrangement (CRA)
  • European Stability Mechanism (ESM)

B. Currency Swap Lines

  • Federal Reserve Central Bank US Dollar Swap Lines
  • PBOC China Central bank RMB Swap Lines

C. Global

  • IMF Financing

D. Self Insurance

  • Nation’s Foreign Exchange (FX) Reserves

 

From The decentralised global monetary system requires an efficient safety net

The global financial safety net as a set of protection mechanisms

The current decentralised system also lacks a central authority that is actively integrated and, above all, contractually bound into the maintenance of the monetary system by providing temporary liquidity, such as the IMF in the Bretton Woods system. Instead, various protection mechanisms have evolved because the current system has not led to greater external stability of national economies and the global economy. The problem of volatile capital flows became particularly clear once again in the course of the financial crisis of 2008 and 2009. For emerging market economies, the warning of a sudden reversal of capital flows has been omnipresent ever since the Asian crisis. However, the last crisis has demonstrated that even for industrialised countries their developed financial markets are a significant contagion mechanism for crisis developments. The following are regarded as key elements of the global financial safety net:11

International reserves. These include official foreign exchange and gold reserves as well as claims on inter-national financial institutions such as the IMF that can be rapidly converted into foreign currency under the countries’ own responsibility. •

Bilateral swap arrangements between central banks.  In a currency swap two central banks agree to exchange currency amounts, e.g. US dollars for euros. They agree on a fixed date in the future on which they will reverse the transaction applying the same exchange rate. During the term central banks can make foreign currency loans to private banks. •

IMF programmes and regional financing arrangements (e.g. European Stability Mechanism, Chiang Mai Initiative Multilateralisation Agreement, BRICs CRA, Arab Monetary Fund, Latin American Reserve Fund). They make financial resources available to the members to tackle balance of payments difficulties, manage crises and prevent regional contagion effects. Depending on their design, they may impose conditions and requirements for economic policy measures on the recipient countries. Some regional programmes require a combination with IMF funds.

The most important element of the protection mechanisms: international reserves

International reserves are by far the largest element of the global safety net.12 The lack of predictability and robustness of other elements has led to an over-accumulation of reserves. After the Asian crisis, upper middle income countries in particular built up reserves. While China holds a major portion of the reserves in this group of countries, all other countries also boosted their reserves significantly. As a result of central bank interventions in the foreign exchange market, reserves have decreased since the year 2013.

The renaissance of bilateral swap arrangements

Bilateral swap arrangements were used by the US Treasury as early as in 1936 to supply developing countries with bridging loans. During the Bretton Woods period, the Fed introduced a network of swap lines known as reciprocal currency arrangements to prevent a sudden and substantial withdrawal of gold by official foreign institutions.13 A swap protected foreign central banks from the exchange rate risk when they had obtained excess and unwanted dollar positions. It allowed them to dispense with the temporary conversion of dollars into gold. Between 1973 and 1980, the swap lines were used instead of US currency reserves to finance interventions by the Fed in the foreign exchange market. Gains and losses were shared with the other central bank when the Fed drew on a line. However, the G10 central banks could try to use the swap arrangements to influence the US foreign currency market interventions, so the Fed stopped using them in the mid-1980s. All existing swap lines except those with Canada and Mexico were ended in 1998. After the terror attacks of September 11, 2001, the Fed established swap lines with the European Central Bank and the Bank of England for 30 days and expanded the existing line with the Bank of Canada. Currency swaps were used here for the first time to restore liquidity in financial markets. During the global financial crisis, the Fed then financed the lender-of-last-resort actions of other central banks in industrialised and emerging market economies, with the latter assuming the credit risk. The international reserves of many central banks at the start of the crisis were smaller than the amounts they borrowed under the swap lines. In 2013 the swap arrangements between the six most important central banks were converted into standing arrangements. All these swap arrangements have one thing in common: they signal the central banks’ willingness to cooperate with each other, whether it be in defence of the parities under the Bretton Woods system, to avert speculative attacks on the Fed, or with the aim of providing dollar liquidity during the financial crisis. China has also set up a far-reaching system of swap arrangements, mainly with the aim of pushing ahead with the internationalisation of the renminbi. But from the perspective of these central banks, the agreements with the Bank of England, the Monetary Authority of Singapore, the Reserve Bank of Australia and the ECB also serve the goal of being able to provide renminbi liquidity in their area of responsibility when needed Swaps represent a powerful and flexible tool of central banks that issue reserve currencies to regulate international capital flows. Central banks are the only institutions capable of changing their balance sheets quickly enough to keep pace with the volatility of international capital flows. Swaps are unsuitable, however, for longer-lasting crises, sovereign debt crises and to finance balance of payments imbalances. That is why they would be the most suitable tool for emerging market economies, as they are more likely to face abrupt changes in capital flows. Nevertheless, so far only the most important central banks that issue reserve currencies have been able to access unlimited swaps. Granting them is determined by the mandate of the central banks and they represent contractual, not institutional agreements. Accordingly, the central banks are able to choose their contractual partners, and there is no central independent authority to supervise swap arrangements. The swap arrangements for central banks in industrial countries that do not issue a reserve currency can therefore be expected to be reinstated in the event of a global shock, while they are less likely to be employed in case of a regional shock. Their use is even less predictable for systemic emerging market economies.

 

Growth of Global Financial Safety Net

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Features of Instruments in the Global Financial Safety net

 

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Use of GFSN in various shock Scenarios

  • Balance of Payment shock
  • Banking Sector FX Liquidity shock
  • Sovereign Debt shock

 

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US Dollar Swap Lines

These six central banks have permanent US Dollar swap lines since 2013.

  • USA (Fed Reserve),
  • Canada (BoC),
  • Japan (BoJ),
  • Switzerland (SNB),
  • EU (ECB),
  • UK(BOE)

 

During the global financial crisis, the Federal Reserve extended swap arrangements to 14 other central banks. The ECB drew very heavily, followed by the BoJ. At one point during the crisis in 2009, outstanding swaps amounted to more than $580 billion and represented about one-quarter of the Fed’s balance sheet. The novel element of this effort was the extension of swaps to four countries outside the usual set of advanced-country central banks: Mexico, Brazil, South Korea and Singapore.16 Mexico previously had a standing swap facility with the Federal Reserve by virtue of geographic proximity and the North American Free Trade Agreement, but the new arrangement expanded the amount that Mexico’s central bank could draw and the Fed’s swaps with Brazil, South Korea and Singapore broke new ground. The swaps in general were credited with preventing a more serious seizing up of interbank lending and financial markets during 2008 to 2009 (Helleiner 2014, 38–45; Prasad 2014, 202–11; IMF 2013a; 2014a, Box 2). The Federal Reserve board of governors considered the “boundary” question at length, torn between opening itself up to additional demands for coverage from emerging markets and creating stigma against those left outside the safety net. Fed officials used economic size and connections to international financial markets as the main criteria for selecting Brazil, Mexico, Singapore and South Korea. Chile, Peru, Indonesia, India, Iceland and likely others also requested swaps but were denied. The governors wanted to deflect requests by additional countries to the IMF, which coordinated its announcement of the SLF with the Fed’s announcement of the additional swaps at the end of October 2008. Governors and staff saw in this tiering a natural division of labour that coincided with the resources and analytical capacity of the Fed and IMF.17 The ECB extended swaps to Hungary, Poland, Sweden, Switzerland and Denmark, in addition to its arrangement with the United States. The BoJ extended swaps as well, notably to South Korea after the Federal Reserve announced its Korean swap. The PBoC began to conclude a set of swap agreements with Asian and non-Asian central banks that would eventually number more than 20 and amount to RMB 2.57 trillion. Only those swaps with the central banks of Hong Kong, Singapore and South Korea are known to have been activated (Zhang 2015, 5). Boosting the role of the renminbi in international trade was the express objective of these swaps, although their establishment also helped to secure market confidence during unsettled times. The proliferation of swaps resulted in a set of star-shaped networks of agreements among central banks that were linked by Fed liquidity (Allen and Moessner 2010). Although a number of the swaps in the network were activated, only those swaps of the Federal Reserve were heavily used during the crisis. The “fortunate four” emerging market countries among the Fed 14 were each covered for amounts up to $30 billion, but only temporarily. When the Fed later declined to renew the swaps,  these countries became as vulnerable to liquidity shortfalls as the others. So, when South Korea took the chair of the G20 in 2010, its government proposed that the central bank swaps be multilateralized on a more permanent basis. It argued this would be increasingly necessary to stabilize the global financial system and would be in the interest of swap providers and recipients alike. Specifically, during the preparations for the G20 summit, South Korean officials proposed that the advanced-country central banks provide swaps to the IMF, which would conduct due diligence and provide liquidity to qualifying central banks. In this way, the global community could mobilize enough resources to address even a massive liquidity crunch and central banks would avoid credit risk.

In late 2013, six key-currency central banks made their temporary swap arrangements permanent standing facilities. Each central bank entered into a bilateral arrangement with the five others, comprising a network of 30 such agreements.18 But they prefer to maintain a constructive ambiguity with respect to whether they would re-extend swap arrangements to the other central banks that were covered during the global financial crisis, including Brazil, Mexico,19 South Korea and Singapore (Papadia 2013).

 

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During the global financial crisis of 2008-2009, Federal Reserve extended USD swap lines to several central banks.  The financial institutions in these countries faced USD shortages as the normal channels of money markets froze during crisis.

 

US Dollar Swap amounts extended during 2008-2009 Global Financial Crisis

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China RMB Swap Lines

During the 2007-8 global financial crisis, the international monetary system experienced an acute US dollar shortage that severely curtailed global trade and pressured international banking business (McCauley and McGuire, 2009; McGuire and von Peter, 2009). The US authorities, in response to the elevated strain in the global market, have arranged dollar swap lines with major central banks to mitigate the global dollar squeeze (Aizenman and Pasricha, 2010; Aizenman, Jinjarak and Park, 2011). On Thursday, October 31, 2013, the network of central banks comprises the Bank of Canada, the Bank of England, the Bank of Japan, the European Central Bank, the Federal Reserve, and the Swiss National Bank agreed to convert their bilateral liquidity swap arrangements to standing arrangements until further notice.1 The dollar squeeze critically illustrated the danger of operating a US-centric global financial system. Against this backdrop, China has actively implemented measures of promoting the cross-border use of the Chinese currency, the renminbi (RMB), to reduce its reliance on the US dollar. The aggressive policy move was considered a clear signal of China’s efforts to internationalize RMB (Chen and Cheung, 2011; Cheung, Ma and McCauley, 2011). In 2009, China launched the scheme of cross-border trade settlement in RMB to encourage the denomination and settlement of international trade in its own currencies. One practical issue of settling trade in RMB is the limited availability of the currency outside China. China at that time had strict regulations on circulating the RMB across its border. To facilitate its RMB trade settlement initiative, China signed its first bilateral RMB local currency swap agreement with the Bank of Korea in December 2008, and the second one with Hong Kong in January 2009. Since then, China has signed various swap agreements with economies around the world.2

 

crossbor7

 

rr2

 

 

BRICS CRA

The 5th and 6th BRICS summits in 2013–2014 marked a watershed in the evolution of the BRICS group with the establishment of the first BRICS institutions. These included the BRICS New Development Bank, the CRA, the BRICS Business Council and the Think Tanks Council. Although this has weakened the ‘political talk shop’ perception of the group, critics have questioned whether these institutions will have a substantive effect. In particular, doubts have been cast upon the effectiveness of the CRA.

The CRA is modest in size in comparison to the IMF and other similar arrangements such as the Chiang Mai Initiative Multilateralization (CMIM). At this stage the BRICS countries have committed $100 billion to the CRA, with China committing $41 billion, Russia, Brazil and India $18 billion each and South Africa $5 billion. The CMIM reportedly has a reserve pool of $240 billion and the IMF resources of $780 billion. It has been noted that with BRICS’s foreign reserves standing at about $5 trillion, a commitment of 16% would take the CRA pool to $800 billion.

 

From GLOBAL AND REGIONAL FINANCIAL SAFETY NETS: LESSONS FROM EUROPE AND ASIA

ASEAN +3 CMIM

ASEAN + Japan Korea China

The embryo of an Asian regional safety net arrangement has existed since 1977, when the five founding members of the ASEAN signed the ASEAN Swap Arrangement (ASA)5. Following the Asian crisis and after aborted discussion on the creation of an Asian Monetary Fund, Japan launched the New Miyazawa Initiative in October 1998 amounting to about $35 billion, which was targeted at stabilising the foreign exchange markets of Indonesia, the Republic of Korea, Malaysia, the Philippines, and Thailand6. The initiative was particularly valuable in containing instability in Malaysia’s financial sector, since that country had refused an IMF Stand-By Arrangement. The Japanese manoeuvre was deemed somewhat mutinous, since the IMF was very critical of Malaysia’s approach. But it also cemented the idea that Asia could gather enough resources to sandbag itself during a crisis period so long as Asian countries were united and managed to roll out timely and credible support mechanisms. In Asian countries under IMF programmes, the conditionality associated with the loans included severe fiscal cuts, deep structural reforms, and substantial increases in interest rates to stabilise currency markets. The economic and social cost of the adjustment was so high and abrupt that it provoked social unrest in a number of countries. This would reverberate strongly in the months that followed and leave a lasting scar in relations between Asian countries and the IMF7. This experience fuelled both a willingness to self-insure through accelerated reserve accumulation and to strengthen regional arrangements to reduce the reliance on global financial safety nets. Building on this lesson, the CMI was formalised in May 2000 during the ASEAN+3 Finance Ministers Meeting8. It largely built on the original ASA and bilateral swap agreements involving the PRC, Japan, and the Republic of Korea but was grounded in a broader programme that also included developing Asia’s local currency bond market and introduced a regional economic review and policy dialogue to enhance the region’s surveillance mechanism (Kawai and Houser 2007). The initiative included the new ASEAN members, increasing the total number of parties to the arrangement from 5 to 10. Table A.1 in the appendix highlights the evolution of the CMI. The question of cooperation between the CMI and the IMF quickly became quite heated, with a number of countries arguing that strong ties to the Fund would defeat the initial purpose of the initiative (Korea Institute of Finance, 2012), but the ties were kept nonetheless both to mitigate moral hazard (Sussangkarn, 2011) and to ensure some consistency with conditionality attached to the IMF’s own programmes. After the formal creation of the CMI in 2000, the era of Great Moderation that followed to some degree doused further ambitions to strengthen regional arrangements. As a result, when the global financial crisis hit in 2008, the Asian regional financial safety net proved too modest to play a meaningful role.

Indeed, instead of seeking support under CMI, the Bank of Korea and the Monetary Authority of Singapore sought a swap agreement with the US Federal Reserve for some $30 billion each. The Republic of Korea concluded bilateral agreements with Japan and the PRC that were not related to the CMI. Similarly, Indonesia established separate bilateral swap lines with Japan and the PRC to shore up its crisis buffer and did not resort to the CMI for credit support (Sussangkarn, 2011). The plan to consolidate the bilateral swap arrangements and form a single, more solid, and effective reserve pooling mechanism – which had initially been put forward by the finance ministers of the ASEAN+3 in May 2007 in Kyoto – was accelerated and evolved in several iterations before the final version was laid out more than two years later. In December 2009, the CMI was multilateralised and the ASEAN+3 representatives signed the Chiang Mai Initiative Multilateralisation (CMIM) Agreement, which effectively became binding on March 24, 2010 (BSP, 2012). These successive transformations have strengthened the initiative, but it remains largely untested. In addition, other aspects of any credible regional financial arrangement, such as surveillance capacity and coordination of some basic economic policies, remain relatively embryonic.

 

 

From GLOBAL AND REGIONAL FINANCIAL SAFETY NETS: LESSONS FROM EUROPE AND ASIA

 

EU ESM

The history of European financial safety nets cannot be dissociated from the history of European monetary integration. With this perspective in mind, it dates back to the late 1960s and has been an ongoing debate to this day. The history of European political integration at every turn is marked by failed projects or actual mechanisms of financial solidarity, ranging from loose exchange rate arrangements to the project of a full-fledged European Monetary Fund. The advent of the monetary union was precisely designed to reduce the need for financial safety nets within the euro area. But the architectural deficiencies of the euro area and the lack of internal transfers have required the establishment of alternative mutual insurance mechanisms since the onset of the euro crisis in 2010. In 2008, when the global financial crisis hit, Hungary had accumulated important external imbalances and large foreign exchange exposures. It had to seek financial assistance almost immediately and initiated contacts with the IMF. The total absence of coordination with European authorities came as an initial shock because it showed that despite decades of intense economic, political, and monetary integration, EU countries could still come to require international financial assistance. The experience pushed European institutions to unearth a forgotten provision of the Maastricht Treaty to provide financial assistance through the Balance of Payments Assistance Facility9. This created preliminary and at first ad-hoc coordination between the IMF and the European Commission, which was then rediscovering design and monitoring of macroeconomic adjustment programmes. Despite the rapid use of this facility and the emergence of a framework of cooperation with the IMF, contagion from the global financial crisis continued for months and prompted some Eastern European leaders to seek broader and more pre-emptive support10, which failed. However, beyond official sector participation, there was a relatively rapid realisation that cross-border banking and financial retrenchment could become a major source of financial disruption and effectively propagate the crisis further – including back to the core of Europe, as large European banks were heavily exposed to Eastern Europe through vast and dense networks of branches and subsidiaries. In response, in late February 2009, under the leadership of the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD), the European Investment Bank (EIB) and the World Bank decided to establish what was known as the Vienna Initiative. This was designed as a joint multilateral and private sector coordination and enforcement mechanism to reduce the risk of banking sector sudden stops. In particular, it compelled cross-border European banks to continue to provide appropriate liquidity to their branches and subsidiaries in Central and Eastern Europe. The formalisation of such an arrangement11 quite early in the crisis has certainly proven the case for coordination of financial institutions in emerging-market economies, especially when a relatively small number of institutions have a disproportionate impact on capital flows. But with the crisis spreading to the euro area, starting with Greece in the fall of 2010, new regional arrangements proved necessary. The lack of instruments forced European officials to first consider bilateral assistance from member states. The idea of involving the IMF was initially violently rejected 9 on intellectual and political grounds12 but proved inevitable. In a number of successive iterations, more solid regional arrangements were designed (Bijlsma and Vallée 2012). Table A.2 in the appendix shows the evolution of European regional financial safety nets.

 

List of Regional Financial Agreements (RFA)

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rr

 

rr7

rr14

 

Key Terms:

  • RMB
  • Bilateral Currency Swaps
  • Reserve Pooling
  • CMI
  • CMIM
  • BRICS CRA
  • AMRO
  • IMF SDR Basket
  • Currency Internationalization
  • Global Liquidity
  • Funding Liquidity
  • Market Liquidity
  • BRICS NDB
  • CHINA AIIB
  • Regional Integration
  • Multilateralism
  • Multipolar
  • FX Swap Networks
  • Central Banks
  • Reserve Currency
  • Global Financial Safety Nets (GFSN)
  • Foreign Exchange Reserves
  • Regional Financial Agreements (RFA)
  • Regional Financial Networks (RFN)
  • Bilateral Currency Swap Agreement (BSA)
  • RMB (Renminbi also known as Yuan)
  • International Lender of Last Resort (ILOLR)
  • Regional Financial Safety Net (RFSN)
  • Multilateral Financial Safety Net (MFSN)
  • National Financial Safety Net (NFSN)

 

Key Sources of Research:

 

Self-Insurance, Reserve Pooling Arrangements, and Pre-emptive Financing

Sunil Sharma

 

https://www.imf.org/external/np/seminars/eng/2006/cpem/pdf/sharma.pdf

 

 

Regional Reserve Pooling Arrangements

Suman S. Basu Ran Bi

Prakash Kannan

First Draft: 8 February, 2010 This Draft: 7 June, 2010

 

http://www.frbsf.org/economic-research/files/Prakash.pdf

 

 

Toward a functional Chiang Mai Initiative

15 May 2012

Author: Chalongphob Sussangkarn, TDRI

http://www.eastasiaforum.org/2012/05/15/toward-a-functional-chiang-mai-initiative/

 

 

The International Financial Architecture and the Role of Regional Funds

Barry Eichengreen

University of California, Berkeley

August 2010

 

http://eml.berkeley.edu/~eichengr/intl_finan_arch_2010.pdf

 

 

Examining the case for Reserve Pooling in East Asia: Empirical Analysis

Ramkishen S. Rajan, Reza Siregar and Graham Bird

2003

 

https://www.adelaide.edu.au/cies/documents/papers/0323.pdf

 

 

Financial Architectures and Development: Resilience, Policy Space and Human Development in the Global South

by Ilene Grabel

2013

 

http://hdr.undp.org/sites/default/files/hdro_1307_grabel.pdf

 

 

International reserves and swap lines: substitutes or complements?

Joshua Aizenman,
Yothin Jinjarak, and Donghyun Park,

March 2010

 

http://economics.ucsc.edu/research/downloads/ajp-ir-sw-0301.pdf

 

 

How can we fix the global financial safety net?

WEF

https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2015/10/how-can-we-fix-the-global-financial-safety-net/

 

 

Regional Monetary Cooperation: Lessons from the Euro Crisis for Developing Areas?

Sebastian Dullien

Barbara Fritz

Laurissa Mühlich

 

http://wer.worldeconomicsassociation.org/files/WEA-WER2-Dullien.pdf

 

 

The Global Dollar System

Stephen G Cecchetti

 

http://people.brandeis.edu/~cecchett/Polpdf/Polp61.pdf

 

 

The Future of the IMF and of Regional Cooperation in East Asia

Yung Chul Park, Charles Wyplosz

2008

 

http://www.nomurafoundation.or.jp/en/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/20081111-12_Y-C_Park-C_Wyplosz.pdf

 

 

China’s Bilateral Currency Swap Agreements: Recent Trends

Aravind Yelery

 

http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1177/0009445515627210

 

 

The Spread of Chinese Swaps

CFR

 

https://www.cfr.org/international-finance/central-bank-currency-swaps-since-financial-crisis/p36419#!/

 

 

Chiang Mai Initiative Multilateralization

http://www.bsp.gov.ph/downloads/Publications/FAQs/CMIM.pdf

 

 

The Chiang Mai Initiative

https://piie.com/publications/chapters_preview/345/3iie3381.pdf

 

 

Beyond the Chiang Mai Initiative: Prospects for Regional Financial and Monetary Integration in East Asia

 

https://www.g24.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/Session-2_1-4.pdf

 

 

Currency internationalisation: an overview

 

Peter B Kenen

 

http://www.bis.org/repofficepubl/arpresearch200903.01.pdf

 

 

 

Why Was the CMI Possible?

Embedded Domestic Preferences and Internationally Nested Constraints in Regional Institution Building in East Asia

Saori N. Katada

 

http://web.isanet.org/Web/Conferences/FLACSO-ISA%20BuenosAires%202014/Archive/1f1966fe-1c48-4d32-a463-ea268ecb2903.pdf

 

 

Emergent International Liquidity Agreements: Central Bank Cooperation after the Global Financial Crisis

Daniel McDowell

 

http://faculty.maxwell.syr.edu/dmcdowel/mcdowell_eln.pdf

 

 

Regional Financial Cooperation in Asia

Daikichi Momma

 

https://www.imf.org/external/np/seminars/eng/2013/PIC/pdf/Session_2_Momma.pdf

 

 

East Asian Economic Cooperation and Integration: Japan’s Perspective

Takatoshi Ito

 

https://www8.gsb.columbia.edu/apec/sites/apec/files/files/discussion/41RegionalCoop.pdf

 

 

What Motivates Regional Financial Cooperation in East Asia Today?

JENNIFER AMYX

 

http://www.eastwestcenter.org/system/tdf/private/api076.pdf?file=1&type=node&id=32049

 

 

Evaluating Asian Swap Arrangements

Joshua Aizenman, Yothin Jinjarak, and Donghyun Park

No. 297 July 2011

 

https://www.adb.org/sites/default/files/publication/156152/adbi-wp297.pdf

 

 

Regional Monetary Cooperation in East Asia Should the United States Be Concerned?

Wen Jin Yuan Melissa Murphy

 

https://csis-prod.s3.amazonaws.com/s3fs-public/legacy_files/files/publication/101129_Yuan_RegionalCoop_WEB.pdf

 

 

Chiang Mai Initiative as the Foundation of Financial Stability in East Asia

http://www.asean.org/uploads/2012/10/17902.pdf

 

 

COMPLEX DECISION IN THE ESTABLISHMENT OF ASIAN REGIONAL FINANCIAL ARRANGEMENT

Iwan J Azis

 

http://www.isahp.org/2003Proceedings/paper/p02.pdf

 

 

Chiang Mai Initiative Multilateralization

December 2013

 

http://www.obela.org/system/files/ChiangMaiInitiative_0.pdf

 

 

 

RMBI or RMBR?
Is the Renminbi Destined to Become a Global or Regional Currency?

Barry Eichengreen

Domenico Lombardi

 

http://clausen.berkeley.edu/assets/clausen_open_pages/3/RMBI_or_RMBR_-_Eichengreen.pdf

 

 

 

Monetary and financial cooperation in Asia: taking stock of recent ongoings

Ramkishen S. Rajan

 

http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.473.361&rep=rep1&type=pdf

 

 

FINANCIAL CRISES AND EAST ASIA’S FINANCIAL COOPERATION

 

By Park Young-joon

 

http://keia.org/sites/default/files/publications/ParkYJ.pdf

 

 

MONETARY INTEGRATION IN EAST ASIA

Peter B. Kenen
Ellen E. Meade

 

http://www.frbsf.org/economic-research/files/Kenen.pdf

 

 

Regional cooperation for financial and exchange rates stability in East Asia

 

Kenichi Shimizu

https://www.swp-berlin.org/fileadmin/contents/products/arbeitspapiere/WP_FG7_2013_01_Dezember_Kenichi_Shimizu.pdf

 

 

ASIAN FINANCIAL CO-OPERATION

Address by Mr GR Stevens

 

https://www.rba.gov.au/publications/bulletin/2005/nov/pdf/bu-1105-3.pdf

 

 

The Rise of China and Regional Integration in East Asia

 

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/290788291_The_Rise_of_China_and_Regional_Integration_in_East_Asia

 

 

REGIONAL FINANCIAL COOPERATION IN EAST ASIA: THE CHIANG MAI INITIATIVE AND BEYOND

 

http://www.unescap.org/sites/default/files/Bulletin02-ch8.pdf

 

 

Financial RegionaliSm: a Review oF the iSSueS

Domenico lombaRDi

2010

 

https://www.brookings.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/11_global_economy_lombardi.pdf

 

 

The layers of the global financial safety net: taking stock

2016

 

https://www.ecb.europa.eu/pub/pdf/other/eb201605_article01.en.pdf

 

 

Regional Financial Arrangements for East Asia: A Different Agenda from Latin America

By Yung Chul Park

 

http://www19.iadb.org/intal/intalcdi/PE/2007/00510.pdf

 

 

Elasticity and Discipline in the Global Swap Network

Perry Mehrling

Working Paper No. 27 November 12, 2015

 

https://www.ineteconomics.org/uploads/papers/WP27-Mehrling.pdf

 

 

 Swap Agreements & China’s RMB Currency Network

https://www.cogitasia.com/swap-agreements-chinas-rmb-currency-network/

 

 

Central Bank Currency Swaps and the International Monetary System

Christophe Destais

 

http://www.obela.org/system/files/CentralBankCurrencySwap_ChristopheDestais.pdf

 

 

Renminbi internationalisation – The pace quickens

https://www.sc.com/en/resources/global-en/pdf/Research/2015/Renminbi-internationalisation-The-pace-quickens.pdf

 

 

What Will China’s RMB Bilateral Currency Swap Deals Lead To?

 

https://www.chinamoneynetwork.com/2013/11/08/what-will-chinas-rmb-bilateral-currency-swap-deals-lead-to

 

 

Emergent International Liquidity Agreements: Central Bank Cooperation after the Global Financial Crisis

Daniel McDowell

 

http://faculty.maxwell.syr.edu/dmcdowel/mcdowell_eln.pdf

 

 

Currency Swap of Central Bank: Influence on International Currency System

 

http://www.sdrf.org.cn/upfile/2016/03/16/20160316142214_202.pdf

 

 

Building Global and Regional Financial Safety Nets

February 2016

Yung Chul Park

 

http://www.reinventingbrettonwoods.org/sites/default/files/35E%20Yung%20Chul%20Park£∫Building%20Global%20and%20Regional%20Financial%20Safety%20Nets%20%20Final.pdf

 

 

RMBI or RMBR?

Is the Renminbi Destined to Become a Global or Regional Currency?

Barry Eichengreen

Domenico Lombardi

 

http://clausen.berkeley.edu/assets/clausen_open_pages/3/RMBI_or_RMBR_-_Eichengreen.pdf

 

 

China’s Bilateral Currency Swap Lines

Yin-Wong Cheung, Hung Hing Ying  LIN Zhitao

ZHAN Wenjie

2016

 

https://www.cb.cityu.edu.hk/ef/doc/GRU/WPS/GRU%232016-013%20_YW.pdf

 

 

Internationalisation of the Chinese Currency: Towards a Multipolar International Monetary System?

Lucia Országhová

 

http://www.nbs.sk/_img/Documents/_PUBLIK_NBS_FSR/Biatec/Rok2016/01-2016/biatec_01_2016_orszaghova.pdf

 

 

Central bank: China currency swap deals surpass 3t yuan

http://english.gov.cn/state_council/ministries/2015/06/11/content_281475125318660.htm

 

 

The International Lender of Last Resort for Emerging Countries: A Bilateral Currency Swap?

Camila Villard Duran

http://www.geg.ox.ac.uk/sites/geg/files/documents/WP_108%20-%20The%20International%20Lender%20of%20Last%20Resort%20for%20Emerging%20Countries%20-%20Camila%20Duran.pdf

 

http://www.modernmoneynetwork.org/sites/default/files/biblio/Duran%20-%20The%20International%20Lender%20of%20Last%20Resort%20for%20Emerging%20Countries.pdf

 

 

Entry of yuan into SDR may give a boost to global liquidity

http://www.marketwatch.com/story/entry-of-yuan-into-sdr-may-give-a-boost-to-global-liquidity-2016-10-17

 

 

Redback Rising: China’s Bilateral Swap Agreements and RMB Internationalization

Steven Liao
Daniel E. McDowell

 

http://www.stevenliao.org/uploads/2/5/6/9/25699716/yuan_isq.pdf

 

 

International reserves and swap lines: substitutes or complements? 

Joshua Aizenman
Yothin Jinjarak,  Donghyun Park

March 2010

 

http://economics.ucsc.edu/research/downloads/ajp-ir-sw-0301.pdf

 

 

The Asian Monetary Fund Reborn? Implications of Chiang Mai Initiative Multilateralization

William W. Grimes

2011

 

https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/files/schools/cas_sites/economics/pdf/Seminars/SemS2011/Grimes.pdf

 

 

Avoiding the next liquidity crunch: how the G20 must support monetary cooperation to increase resilience to crisis

Camila Villard Duran

 

http://www.geg.ox.ac.uk/sites/geg/files/GEG%20Villard%20Duran%20October%202015.pdf

 

Stitching together the global financial safety net

Edd Denbee, Carsten Jung and Francesco Paternò

2016

 

http://www.bankofengland.co.uk/financialstability/Documents/fpc/fspapers/fs_paper36.pdf

 

 

Why Are There Large Foreign Exchange Reserves?  The Case of South Korea

Franklin Allen

Joo Yun Hong

 

http://www.kossrec.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/01_KSSJ_11-02-03.pdf

 

 

Federal Reserve Policy in an International Context

Ben S. Bernanke

 

http://www.imf.org/external/np/res/seminars/2015/arc/pdf/Bernanke.pdf

 

 

The dollar’s international role: An “exorbitant privilege”?

Ben S. Bernanke

Thursday, January 7, 2016

https://www.brookings.edu/blog/ben-bernanke/2016/01/07/the-dollars-international-role-an-exorbitant-privilege-2/

 

 

TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT, 2015

Making the international financial architecture work for development

 

http://unctad.org/en/PublicationChapters/tdr2015ch3_en.pdf

 

 

Global Economic Governance in Asia: Through the Looking Glass of the European Sovereign Debt Crisis

China in Global Financial Governance: Implications from Regional Leadership Challenge in East Asia

Takashi Terada

 

https://lkyspp.nus.edu.sg/cag/wp-content/uploads/sites/5/2013/07/China-in-Global-Financial-Governance-Implications-from-Regional-Leadership-Challenge-in-East-Asia-by-Takashi-Terada.pdf

 

 

Central Bank Currency Swaps Key to International Monetary System

http://andrewsheng.net/Article_Central_bank_currency_swaps_key_to_IMS.html

 

 

The Federal Reserve’s Foreign Exchange Swap Lines

Michael J. Fleming and Nicholas J. Klagge

 

https://www.newyorkfed.org/medialibrary/media/research/current_issues/ci16-4.pdf

 

 

Central Bank Liquidity Swaps

https://www.newyorkfed.org/markets/liquidity_swap.html

 

 

Central Bank Dollar Swap Lines and Overseas Dollar Funding Costs

Linda S. Goldberg, Craig Kennedy, and Jason Miu

 

http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.422.11&rep=rep1&type=pdf

 

 

eXperience With foreign currency liquidity-providing centrAl bAnK sWAps

 

https://www.ecb.europa.eu/pub/pdf/other/art1_mb201408_pp65-82en.pdf

 

 

Banking on China through Currency Swap Agreements

October 23, 2015

By Cindy Li

http://www.frbsf.org/banking/asia-program/pacific-exchange-blog/banking-on-china-renminbi-currency-swap-agreements/

 

 

TESTING THE GLOBAL CENTRAL BANK SWAP NETWORK

http://www.perrymehrling.com/2015/07/testing-the-global-central-bank-swap-network/

 

 

The impact of international swap lines on stock returns of banks in emerging markets

Alin Marius Andries1 Andreas M. Fischer2 Pınar Ye ̧sin

June 2015

 

http://www.snb.ch/n/mmr/reference/sem_2015_07_09_Andries_Fischer_Yesin/source/sem_2015_07_09_Andries_Fischer_Yesin.n.pdf

 

 

Why Did the US Federal Reserve Unprecedentedly Offer Swap Lines to Emerging Market Economies during the Global Financial Crisis? Can We Expect Them Again in the Future?

Hyoung-kyu Chey

 

http://www.grips.ac.jp/r-center/wp-content/uploads/11-18.pdf

 

 

International reserves and swap lines: substitutes or complements? 

Joshua Aizenman,
Yothin Jinjarak,  Donghyun Park

July 2010

 

https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/3145/037b0b0312cfb51cee7dffd5c3399332a669.pdf

 

 

Central Bank Dollar Swap Lines and Overseas Dollar Funding Costs

Linda S. Goldberg Craig Kennedy Jason Miu

 

https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/4cbb/9a564d30e508dcd3799ceb7a99b5e2c2e273.pdf

 

 

Central Bank Liquidity Swaps

https://www.clevelandfed.org/newsroom-and-events/publications/economic-trends/2011-economic-trends/et-20111219-central-bank-liquidity-swaps.aspx

 

 

Central bank currency swaps key to international monetary system

April 2014

Author: Andrew Sheng, Fung Global Institute

http://www.eastasiaforum.org/2014/04/01/central-bank-currency-swaps-key-to-international-monetary-system/

 

 

Evaluating Asian Swap Arrangements

Joshua Aizenman, Yothin Jinjarak, and Donghyun Park

No. 297 July 2011

 

https://www.adb.org/sites/default/files/publication/156152/adbi-wp297.pdf

 

 

Central Bank Liquidity Swaps Overview

Yubo Wang

February 15, 2010

 

http://www.centerforfinancialstability.org/research/Central_Bank_Liquidity_Swaps_201002.pdf

 

 

The implications of cross-border banking and foreign currency swap lines for the international monetary system

 

Már Guðmundsson:

https://www.imf.org/external/np/seminars/eng/2011/res/pdf/MGpresentation.pdf

 

 

The Politics of Rescuing the World’s Financial System: The Federal Reserve as a Global Lender of Last Resort

J. Lawrence Broz

 

2014

http://robobees.seas.harvard.edu/files/pegroup/files/broz2014.pdf

 

 

From Exorbitant Privilege to Existential Trilemma

 

https://doc.research-and-analytics.csfb.com/docView?language=ENG&format=PDF&sourceid=em&document_id=1067001821&serialid=FdgDLSRBS51YJLr69%2BcO6H1iGqGyLNuzqEDE5DwoUt8%3D

 

 

The dollar is now everyone’s problem

September 29, 2014

http://www.moneyandbanking.com/commentary/2014/9/29/the-dollar-is-now-everyones-problem

 

 

The Global Dollar System

Stephen G Cecchetti

 

http://people.brandeis.edu/~cecchett/Polpdf/Polp61.pdf

 

 

Central Bank Swaps and International Dollar Illiquidity

Andrew K. Rose Mark M. Spiegel∗

March 14, 2012

 

http://faculty.haas.berkeley.edu/arose/RSGJE.pdf

 

 

DOLLAR FUNDING AND THE LENDING BEHAVIOR OF GLOBAL BANKS

VICTORIA IVASHINA DAVID S. SCHARFSTEIN JEREMY C. STEIN

First draft: October 2012 This draft: March 2015

 

http://www.hbs.edu/faculty/Publication%20Files/ISS%20revision%20march%202015%20FINAL_7529aa88-fe19-4fd1-8427-43b83c5d8589.pdf

 

 

THE INTERNATIONALIZATION OF THE RENMINBI AND THE RISE OF A MULTIPOLAR CURRENCY SYSTEM

By Miriam Campanella

 

http://www.ecipe.org/app/uploads/2014/12/WP201201_1.pdf

 

 

Dollar Illiquidity and Central Bank Swap Arrangements During the Global Financial Crisis

Andrew K. Rose Mark M. Spiegel

August 2011

 

http://www.frbsf.org/economic-research/files/wp11-18bk.pdf

 

 

Central Bank Dollar Swap Lines and Overseas Dollar Funding Costs

Linda S. Goldberg, Craig Kennedy, Jason Miu

http://www.nber.org/papers/w15763.pdf

 

 

US Dollar Swap Arrangements between Central Banks

 

https://www.rba.gov.au/publications/smp/2008/nov/pdf/box-b.pdf

 

 

Currency Swaps with Foreign Central Banks

 

BY RENEE COURTOIS

 

https://www.richmondfed.org/-/media/richmondfedorg/publications/research/region_focus/2010/q2/pdf/policy_update.pdf

 

 

Central Banks Make Swaps Permanent as Crisis Backstop

Jeff Black

October 31, 2013

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2013-10-31/ecb-makes-crisis-cash-lines-at-central-banks-permanent

 

 

Swap Lines Underscore the Dollar’s Global Role

 

https://www.frbatlanta.org/-/media/documents/regional-economy/econsouth/12q1currencyswaps.pdf

 

 

Central bank co-operation and international liquidity in the financial crisis of 2008-9

by William A Allen and Richhild Moessner

Monetary and Economic Department

May 2010

 

http://www.bis.org/publ/work310.pdf

 

 

Financial instability, Reserves, and Central Bank Swap Lines in the Panic of 2008

Maurice Obstfeld Jay C. Shambaugh  Alan M. Taylor

 

http://www.dartmouth.edu/~jshambau/Papers/ObstfeldShambaughTaylorAEAPP.pdf

 

 

The Federal Reserve as Global Lender of Last Resort, 2007-2010

 

J. Lawrence Broz

 

http://ucrpoliticaleconomy.ucr.edu/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/Broz_Fed.pdf

 

 

Lenders of Last Resort and Global Liquidity

Rethinking the system

 

http://siteresources.worldbank.org/WBI/Resources/213798-1259968479602/outreach_obstfeld_dec09.pdf

 

 

The Fed’s FX swap facilities have been quiet… too quiet?

https://ftalphaville.ft.com/2016/07/13/2169137/the-feds-fx-swap-facilities-have-been-quiet-too-quiet/

 

 

Swap Lines Underscore the Dollar’s Global Role

 

https://frbatlanta.org/-/media/documents/regional-economy/econsouth/12q1currencyswaps.pdf

 

 

THE EVOLUTION OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SWAP LINES SINCE 1962

Michael D. Bordo Owen F. Humpage Anna J. Schwartz

2014

 

http://www.nber.org/papers/w20755.pdf

 

 

How China Covered The World In “Liquidity Swap Lines”

http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2015-05-17/how-china-covered-world-liquidity-swap-lines

 

 

The Federal Reserve’s Foreign Exchange Swap Lines

Michael J. Fleming  Nicholas Klagge

April 1, 2010

https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers2.cfm?abstract_id=1597320

 

 

The Federal Reserve as Global Lender of Last Resort, 2007-2010

 

J. Lawrence Broz

 

http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/60951/1/dp-30.pdf

 

 

The Fed’s Role in International Crises

Donald Kohn

Thursday, September 18, 2014

https://www.brookings.edu/on-the-record/the-feds-role-in-international-crises/

 

 

Options for meeting the demand for international liquidity during financial crises

 

http://www.bis.org/publ/qtrpdf/r_qt1009g.pdf

 

 

The Chiang Mai Initiative Multilateralization: Origin, Development and Outlook

Chalongphob Sussangkarn

No. 230 July 2010

 

https://www.adb.org/sites/default/files/publication/156085/adbi-wp230.pdf

 

 

The Amended Chiang Mai Initiative Multilateralisation (CMIM) Comes Into Effect on July 17, 2014

 

https://www.boj.or.jp/en/announcements/release_2014/rel140717a.pdf

 

 

Note on Chiang Mai Initiative Multilateralization (CMIM)* 

Chalongphob Sussangkarn

 

http://policydialogue.org/files/events/Chalongphabs_Note.pdf

 

 

SOURCES AND EVOLUTION OF THE CHIANG MAI INITIATIVE

 

Vyacheslav Amirov

https://interaffairs.ru/i/pdf_asean/7.pdf

 

 

The Chiang Mai Initiative

PIIE

https://piie.com/publications/chapters_preview/345/3iie3381.pdf

 

 

Why Was the CMI Possible?

Embedded Domestic Preferences and Internationally Nested Constraints in Regional Institution Building in East Asia**

Saori N. Katada

 

http://web.isanet.org/Web/Conferences/FLACSO-ISA%20BuenosAires%202014/Archive/1f1966fe-1c48-4d32-a463-ea268ecb2903.pdf

 

 

From the Chiang Mai Initiative to an Asian Monetary Fund

Masahiro Kawai

No. 527 May 2015

 

https://www.adb.org/sites/default/files/publication/160056/adbi-wp527.pdf

 

 

Asian Monetary Fund: Getting Nearer

By Pradumna B. Rana

 

https://www.rsis.edu.sg/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/CO11079.pdf

 

 

Panel on Financial Affairs Meeting on 2 November 2009

 

Background Brief
on Hong Kong’s participation in Chiang Mai Initiative Multilateralization

 

http://www.legco.gov.hk/yr09-10/english/panels/fa/papers/fa1102cb1-144-e.pdf

 

 

The Chiang Mai Initiative Multilateralisation: Origin, Development and Outlook

 

 

Much Ado about Nothing? Chiang Mai Initiative Multilateralisation and East Asian Exchange Rate Cooperation

Wolf HASSDORF

 

http://www.ritsumei.ac.jp/acd/cg/ir/college/bulletin/e-vol.10/06Hassdorf.pdf

 

 

Financial Safety Nets in Asia: Genesis, Evolution, Adequacy, and Way Forward

Hal Hill and Jayant Menon

 

https://crawford.anu.edu.au/acde/publications/publish/papers/wp2012/wp_econ_2012_17.pdf

 

 

Financial Community Building in East Asia

The Chiang Mai Initiative: Its Causes and Evaluation

 

EPIK 2010 Economics of Community Building

Yoon Jin Lee

 

http://www.eai.or.kr/data/bbs/kor_report/YoonJinLee.pdf

 

 

FROM “TAOGUANG YANGHUI” TO “YOUSUO ZUOWEI”:

CHINA’S ENGAGEMENT IN FINANCIAL MINILATERALISM

HONGYING WANG

 

https://www.cigionline.org/sites/default/files/cigi_paper_no52.pdf

 

 

Foundation of Regional Integration: Common or Divergent Interests?

Yong Wook Lee

 

http://www.eastasiair.com/uploads/2/9/7/5/29758289/이용욱-_foundation_of_regional_integration__1_.pdf

 

 

CMIM and ESM: ASEAN+3 and Eurozone Crisis Management and Resolution Liquidity Provision in Comparative Perspective

Ramon PACHECO PARDO

 

http://law.nus.edu.sg/cbfl/pdfs/working_papers/CBFL-WP-RPP01.pdf

 

 

An Overview of Regional Financial Cooperation: Implication for BRICS Contingent Reserve Arrangement

Zhang Liqing,NianShuting

 

http://www.sdrf.org.cn/upfile/2016/03/16/20160316142109_641.pdf

 

 

CMIM-Asian Multilateralism and Cooperation

Keynote speech by Dr. Junhong Chang, AMRO Director, at the 6th Asia Research Forum
1 July 2016

http://www.amro-asia.org/keynote-speech-by-dr-junhong-chang-amro-director-at-the-6th-asia-research-forum-cmim-asian-multilateralism-and-cooperation/

 

 

Financial RegionaliSm: a Review oF the iSSueS

Domenico lombaRDi

 

https://www.brookings.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/11_global_economy_lombardi.pdf

 

 

Practices of Financial Regionalism and the Negotiation of Community in East Asia

Mikko Huotari

 

https://www.southeastasianstudies.uni-freiburg.de/Content/files/occasional-paper-series/op8_huotari_feb-2012_end.pdf

 

 

Financial Integration in Emerging Asian Economies

Gladys Siow

 

http://www.ipedr.com/vol38/032-ICEBI2012-A10048.pdf

 

 

Regional Monetary Cooperation: Lessons from the Euro Crisis for Developing Areas?

Sebastian Dullien

Barbara Fritz

Laurissa Mühlich

 

http://wer.worldeconomicsassociation.org/files/WEA-WER2-Dullien.pdf

 

 

The Need and Scope for Strengthening Co-operation Between Regional Financing Arrangements and the IMF

 

Ulrich Volz

 

http://edoc.vifapol.de/opus/volltexte/2014/5026/pdf/DP_15.2012.pdf

 

 

Towards institutionalization: The BRICS Contingent Reserve Arrangement (CRA)

http://www.postwesternworld.com/2013/05/12/the-politics-of-the-brics-contingency-reserve-arrangement-cra/

 

 

The BRICS Contingent Reserve Arrangement and its Position

in the Emerging Global Financial Architecture

NIColETTE CATTANEo, MAyAMIko BIzIwICk & DAvID FRyER

 

https://www.saiia.org.za/policy-insights/752-policy-insights-10-the-brics-contingent-reserve-arrangement-and-its-position-in-the-emerging-global-financial-architecture/file

 

 

Financial Architectures and Development:

Resilience, Policy Space and Human Development in the Global South

by Ilene Grabel

 

http://hdr.undp.org/sites/default/files/hdro_1307_grabel.pdf

 

 

Financial Regionalism in East Asia

 

http://www.economia.uniroma2.it/mondragone/Public/16/File/VOLZ.pdf

 

 

Enhancing the Effectiveness of CMIM and AMRO: Selected Immediate Challenges and Tasks

Reza Siregar and Akkharaphol Chabchitrchaidol

No. 403 January 2013

 

http://saber.eaber.org/sites/default/files/documents/2013.01.17.wp403.enhancing.effectiveness.cmim_.amro_.pdf

 

 

Regional and Global Liquidity Arrangements

Ulrich Volz / Aldo Caliari (Editors)

 

http://eml.berkeley.edu/~eichengr/regional_funds_oct2010.pdf

 

 

A regional reserve fund for Latin America

Daniel Titelman, Cecilia Vera, Pablo Carvallo and Esteban Pérez Caldentey

 

http://repositorio.cepal.org/bitstream/handle/11362/37018/RVI112Titelmanetal_en.pdf

 

 

Financial Crises as Catalysts for Regional Integration? The Chances and Obstacles for Monetary Integration in ASEAN+3 and MERCOSUR

Sebastian Krapohl  Daniel Rempe

 

http://www.eisa-net.org/be-bruga/eisa/files/events/stockholm/KrapohlRempe.pdf

 

 

Financial Integration

 

http://www.aec.com.mm/download/Financial%20Integration.pdf

 

 

Framework of the ASEAN Plus Three Mechanisms Operating in the Sphere of Economic Cooperation

Prof. Dr. Vyacheslav V. Gavrilov

 

http://cale.law.nagoya-u.ac.jp/_src/sc597/CALE20DP20No.207-110826.pdf

 

 

Regional Integration in Europe and East Asia: Experiences of Integration and Lessons from Functional Multilateralism

Uwe Wissenbach

 

http://gsis.korea.ac.kr/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/13-2-02_Uwe_Wissenbach.pdf

 

 

General Overview: “Financial Risk and Crisis Management after the Global Financial Crisis”

 

https://www.jeri.or.jp/en/activities/pdf/Jun2016No9.pdf

 

 

Remaking the architecture: the emerging powers, self-insuring and regional insulation 

GREGORY T. CHIN

 

http://www.risingpowersinitiative.org/wp-content/uploads/chin1.pdf

 

 

The Origins and Transformation of East Asian Financial Regionalism

 

http://dspace.uni.lodz.pl:8080/xmlui/bitstream/handle/11089/18824/6-069_084-Klecha-Tylec.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y

 

 

Regional Financial Arrangement: An Impetus for Regional Policy Cooperation

Reza Siregar and Keita Miyaki

 

https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/51050/1/MPRA_paper_51050.pdf

 

 

Role of Regional Institutions in East Asia

 

http://www.eria.org/RPR_FY2011_No.10_Chapter_11.pdf

 

 

Asia’s new financial safety net: Is the Chiang Mai Initiative designed not to be used?

Hal Hill, Jayant Menon

25 July 2012

http://voxeu.org/article/chiang-mai-initiative-designed-not-be-used

 

 

Will the new BRICS institutions work?

 

https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2014/08/brics-new-development-bank-contingent-reserve-agreement/

 

 

BRICS NEW DEVELOPMENT BANK AND CONTINGENT RESERVE ARRANGEMENT

 

http://pmg-assets.s3-website-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/150428BRICS_Bank.pdf

 

 

The Contingent Reserve Arrangement and the International Monetary System

Manmohan Agarwal

 

http://www.icsin.org/uploads/2015/04/12/2ead896b5e52456a098bbd2d0b25774b.pdf

 

 

The BRICS Bank and Reserve Arrangement: towards a new global financial framework?

2014

 

http://www.europarl.europa.eu/RegData/etudes/ATAG/2014/542178/EPRS_ATA(2014)542178_REV1_EN.pdf

 

 

China’s Bilateral Currency Swap Lines

Lin Zhitao Zhan Wenjie Yin-Wong Cheung

CESIFO WORKING PAPER NO. 5736 CATEGORY 7:MONETARY POLICY AND INTERNATIONAL FINANCE JANUARY 2016

 

 

Elasticity and Discipline in the Global Swap Network

Perry Mehrling Barnard College and INET

November 6, 2015

http://www.perrymehrling.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/Global-Swap-Network.pdf

 

 

A Proposal for a New Regional Financial Arrangement: The Reserve Liquidity Line

Young-Joon Park

2014

 

 

International Liquidity in a Multipolar World

Barry Eichengreen

 

 

 

International Liquidity Swaps: Is the Chiang Mai Initiative Pooling Reserves Efficiently ?

Emanuel Kohlscheen and Mark P. Tayl

http://macro.soc.uoc.gr/11conf/docs/liquidity_swaps.pdf

http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/soc/economics/research/workingpapers/2008/twerp_752.pdf

 

 

International Reserves and Swap Lines in Times of Financial Distress: Overview and Interpretations

Joshua Aizenman

No. 192 February 2010

https://www.adb.org/sites/default/files/publication/156047/adbi-wp192.pdf

 

 

Coordinating Regional and Multilateral Financial Institutions

C. Randall Henning

 

https://piie.com/publications/wp/wp11-9.pdf

 

 

The Asian Monetary Fund Reborn? Implications of Chiang Mai Initiative Multilateralization

William W. Grimes

https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/files/schools/cas_sites/economics/pdf/Seminars/SemS2011/Grimes.pdf

 

 

REGIONAL LIQUIDITY MECHANISMS IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES

Gustavo Rojas de Cerqueira César

http://repositorio.ipea.gov.br/bitstream/11058/6420/1/PWR_v4_n3_Regional.pdf

 

 

Much Ado about Nothing? Chiang Mai Initiative Multilateralisation and East Asian Exchange Rate Cooperation

Wolf HASSDORF

http://www.ritsumei.ac.jp/acd/cg/ir/college/bulletin/e-vol.10/06Hassdorf.pdf

 

 

Global Liquidity: Public and Private

Jean-Pierre Landau

 

http://www.jeanpierrelandau.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/Jackson-Hole-Print.pdf

 

 

Safety for whom? The scattered global financial safety net and the role of regional financial arrangements

Mühlich, Laurissa; Fritz, Barbara

 

http://www.ssoar.info/ssoar/bitstream/handle/document/48298/ssoar-2016-muhlich_et_al-Safety_for_whom_The_scattered.pdf?sequence=1

 

 

The International Financial Architecture and the Role of Regional Funds

Barry Eichengreen

August 2010

 

http://eml.berkeley.edu/~eichengr/intl_finan_arch_2010.pdf

 

 

The evolving multi-layered global financial safety net : role of Asia

 

 

 

Asian Regional Financial Safety Nets? Don’t Hold Your Breath

Iwan J Azis

https://www.mof.go.jp/english/pri/publication/pp_review/ppr017/ppr017e.pdf

 

 

STITCHING TOGETHER THE GLOBAL FINANCIAL SAFETY NET

Minouche Shafik,

Deputy Governor, Bank of England

26th February 2016

 

http://www.reinventingbrettonwoods.org/sites/default/files/31E%20Minouche%20Shafik£∫Stitching%20Together%20The%20Global%20Financial%20Safety%20Net.pdf

 

 

The Global Financial Safety Net through the Prism of G20 Summits

Gong Cheng

European Stability Mechanism

https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/68070/1/MPRA_paper_68070.pdf

 

 

ADEQUACY OF THE GLOBAL FINANCIAL SAFETY NET

 

 The Evolving Multi-layered Global Financial Safety Net: Role of Asia

Pradumna B. Rana

 

Global Financial Safety Nets: Where Do We Go from Here?
Eduardo Levy-Yeyati and Eduardo Fernández-AriasFriday,
January 14, 2011
 Strengthening the Global Financial Safety Net

 

The Global Liquidity Safety Net

Institutional Cooperation on Precautionary Facilities and Central Bank Swaps

https://www.cigionline.org/sites/default/files/new_thinking_g20_no5_web.pdf

 

 

Inadequate Regional Financial Safety Nets Reflect Complacency

Iwan J. Azis

No. 411 March 2013

 

https://www.adb.org/sites/default/files/publication/156266/adbi-wp411.pdf

 

 

Stitching together the global financial safety net

by Edd Denbee, Carsten Jung and Francesco Paternò

 

https://www.bancaditalia.it/pubblicazioni/qef/2016-0322/QEF_322_16.pdf

 

 

GLOBAL AND REGIONAL FINANCIAL SAFETY NETS: LESSONS FROM EUROPE AND ASIA

CHANGYONG RHEE, LEA SUMULONG AND SHAHIN VALLÉE

 

http://bruegel.org/wp-content/uploads/imported/publications/WP_2013_02.pdf

 

 

Financial Safety Nets in Asia: Genesis, Evolution, Adequacy, and Way Forward

 

Hal Hill and Jayant Menon

No. 395 November 2012

https://www.adb.org/sites/default/files/publication/156250/adbi-wp395.pdf

 What we really know about the global financial safety net

 

Beatrice Scheubel, Livio Stracca

04 October 2016

Global Financial Safety Nets: Where Do We Go from Here?

Eduardo Fernandez-Arias

Eduardo Levy Levy-Yeyati

November 2010

Global Financial Safety Nets
How can countries cooperate to mitigate contagion and limit the spread of crises?November 7, 2011

 

What do we know about the global financial safety net? Rationale, data and possible evolution

 Global Financial Safety Net