Competition, Concentration, and Anti-Trust Laws in the USA

Competition, Concentration, and Anti-Trust Laws in the USA

 

Currently the US FTC has been having hearings on concentration, competition, and anti-trust laws in the USA.  Several conferences are organized starting with September 2018.  I present links to hearings details and videos of the sessions.  As of now, two hearings have already taken place.  I have given the links to the third hearing below.  Economists Joe Stiglitz and Jason Furman have given speeches and presentations during first and second hearings.

Key Sources of Research:

Hearings on Competition and Consumer Protection in the 21st Century

Hearings on Competition and Consumer Protection in the 21st Century

The Federal Trade Commission will hold a series of public hearings during the fall and winter 2018 examining whether broad-based changes in the economy, evolving business practices, new technologies, or international developments might require adjustments to competition and consumer protection law, enforcement priorities, and policy. The PDF version of this content includes footnotes and sources. All the hearings will be webcast live.

 

https://www.ftc.gov/policy/hearings-competition-consumer-protection

https://www.ftc.gov/system/files/attachments/hearings-competition-consumer-protection-21st-century/hearings-announcement_0.pdf

 

 

Hearings on Competition and Consumer Protection in the 21st Century: Opening Session

September 14, 2018

DAVIS POLK

 

https://www.davispolk.com/files/2018-09-14_hearings_on_competition_consumer_protection_in_21st_century.pdf

 

 

FTC Hearing #1: Competition and Consumer Protection in the 21st Century

Hearing #1 On Competition and Consumer Protection in the 21st Century, September 13-14, 2018

 

https://www.ftc.gov/news-events/events-calendar/2018/09/ftc-hearing-1-competition-consumer-protection-21st-century

https://www.ftc.gov/system/files/documents/public_events/1398386/agenda-hearings-georgetown_3.pdf

https://www.ftc.gov/news-events/audio-video/video/competition-consumer-protection-21st-century-welcome-session-1

https://www.ftc.gov/news-events/audio-video/video/competition-consumer-protection-21st-century-welcome-session-2

https://www.ftc.gov/news-events/audio-video/video/competition-consumer-protection-21st-century-welcome-session-3

 

 

 

 

FTC Hearing #2: Competition and Consumer Protection in the 21st Century

FTC Hearing #2: Competition and Consumer Protection in the 21st Century

 

https://www.ftc.gov/news-events/press-releases/2018/09/ftc-announces-second-session-hearings-competition-consumer

https://www.ftc.gov/system/files/documents/public_events/1408208/hearings-agenda-cc-sept_0.pdf

https://www.ftc.gov/news-events/audio-video/video/ftc-hearing-2-competition-consumer-protection-21st-century-state-us-0

https://www.ftc.gov/news-events/audio-video/video/ftc-hearing-2-competition-consumer-protection-21st-century-state-us

https://www.ftc.gov/news-events/audio-video/video/ftc-hearing-2-competition-consumer-protection-21st-century-monopsony

 

FTC Hearing #3: Competition and Consumer Protection in the 21st Century

FTC Hearing #3: Competition and Consumer Protection in the 21st Century - George Mason University

 

https://www.ftc.gov/news-events/events-calendar/2018/10/ftc-hearing-3-competition-consumer-protection-21st-century

 https://www.ftc.gov/system/files/documents/public_events/1413712/hearings-agenda-gmu_5.pdf

THE UNITED STATES HAS A MARKET CONCENTRATION PROBLEM

REVIEWING CONCENTRATION ESTIMATES IN ANTITRUST MARKETS, 2000-PRESENT

 

ISSUE BRIEF BY ADIL ABDELA AND MARSHALL STEINBAUM

SEPTEMBER 2018

 

https://www.ftc.gov/system/files/documents/public_comments/2018/09/ftc-2018-0074-d-0042-155544.pdf

 

Nobel Prize-winning economist Joseph Stiglitz says the US has a major monopoly problem

https://www.businessinsider.com/joseph-stiglitz-says-the-us-has-a-major-monopoly-problem-2018-9

 

 

Competition Conference 2018

What’s the Evidence for Strengthening Competition Policy?

Boston University

http://sites.bu.edu/tpri/news-and-events/competition-conference-2018/

http://sites.bu.edu/tpri/competition-conference-2018-program-and-papers/

 

Slower Productivity and Higher Inequality: Are They Related?

Jason Furman and Peter Orszag

June 2018

 

https://piie.com/system/files/documents/wp18-4.pdf

 

 

 

Market Power and Monetary Policy

Speech given by

Andrew G Haldane Chief Economist Bank of England

Co-authors: Tommaso Aquilante, Shiv Chowla, Nikola Dacic, Riccardo Masolo, Patrick Schneider, Martin Seneca and Srdan Tatomir.

Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City Economic Policy Symposium Jackson Hole, Wyoming

24 August 2018

 

https://www.bankofengland.co.uk/-/media/boe/files/speech/2018/market-power-and-monetary-policy-speech-by-andy-haldane.pdf?la=en&hash=ECC7B63705847EC5E68DEFC86C56B887B9DBD0CD

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Resource Flows: Material Flow Accounting (MFA), Life Cycle Analysis (LCA), Input Output Networks and other methods

Resource Flows: Material Flow Accounting (MFA), Life Cycle Analysis (LCA), Input Output Networks and other methods

 

 

 

From Materials Flow and Sustainability

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Key Terms:

  • MFA (Material Flow Analysis)
  • MFCA (Material Flow Cost Accounting)
  • LCA (Life Cycle Analysis)
  • SFA (Substance Flow Analysis)
  • MF WIO (Material Flow Waste Input Output)
  • IO LCA (Input Output Life Cycle Analysis)
  • KLEM (Capital, Labor, Energy, Materials)
  • PIOT ( Physical Input Output Tables)
  • MIOT (Monetary Input Output Tables)
  • IO MFN (Input Output Material Flow Network)
  • Social Ecology
  • Industrial Ecology
  • Urban Metabolism
  • Industrial Symbiosis
  • Industrial Metabolism
  • M-P Chains (Material Product Chains)
  • Global Value Chains
  • National Footprint Accounts
  • Inter Industry Analysis
  • Input Output Economics
  • End to End Supply Chains
  • Supply and Use Tables
  • Material Balance
  • Mass Balance
  • Biophysical Economics
  • Ecological Economics
  • Environmentally Extended Input Output Analysis (EE-IOA)
  • Stocks and Flows
  • MaTrace
  • Global MaTrace

 

Software for Data Analysis and Visualization:

 

This article lists several other software packages for MFA/SFA

https://www.azavea.com/blog/2017/08/09/six-sankey-diagram-tool/

 

 

Material Flow Analysis

From Practical Handbook of MATERIAL FLOW ANALYSIS

Material flow analysis (MFA) is a systematic assessment of the flows and stocks of materials within a system defined in space and time. It connects the sources, the pathways, and the intermediate and final sinks of a material. Because of the law of the conservation of matter, the results of an MFA can be controlled by a simple material balance comparing all inputs, stocks, and outputs of a process. It is this distinct characteristic of MFA that makes the method attractive as a decision-support tool in resource management, waste management, and environmental management.

An MFA delivers a complete and consistent set of information about all flows and stocks of a particular material within a system. Through balancing inputs and outputs, the flows of wastes and environmental loadings become visible, and their sources can be identified. The depletion or accumulation of material stocks is identified early enough either to take countermeasures or to promote further buildup and future utilization. Moreover, minor changes that are too small to be measured in short time scales but that could slowly lead to long-term damage also become evident.

Anthropogenic systems consist of more than material flows and stocks (Figure 1.1). Energy, space, information, and socioeconomic issues must also be included if the anthroposphere is to be managed in a responsible way. MFA can be performed without considering these aspects, but in most cases, these other factors are needed to interpret and make use of the MFA results. Thus, MFA is frequently coupled with the analysis of energy, economy, urban planning, and the like.

In the 20th century, MFA concepts have emerged in various fields of study at different times. Before the term MFA had been invented, and before its comprehensive methodology had been developed, many researchers used the law of conservation of matter to balance processes. In process and chemical engineering, it was common practice to analyze and balance inputs and outputs of chemical reactions. In the economics field, Leontief introduced input–output tables in the 1930s, thus laying the base for widespread application of input–output methods to solve economic problems. The first studies in the fields of resource conservation and environmental management appeared in the 1970s. The two original areas of application were (1) the metabolism of cities and (2) the analysis of pollutant pathways in regions such as watersheds or urban areas. In the following decades, MFA became a widespread tool in many fields, including process control, waste and wastewater treatment, agricultural nutrient management, water-quality management, resource conservation and recovery, product design, life cycle assessment (LCA), and others.

 

Substance Flow Analysis

From Feasibility assessment of using the substance flow analysis methodology for chemicals information at macro level

SFA is used for tracing the flow of a selected chemical (or group of substances) through a defined system. SFA is a specific type of MFA tool, dealing only with the analysis of flows of chemicals of special interest (Udo de Haes et al., 1997). SFA can be defined as a detailed level application of the basic MFA concept tracing the flow of selected chemical substances or compounds — e.g. heavy metals (mercury (Hg), lead (Pb), etc.), nitrogen (N), phosphorous (P), persistent organic substances, such as PCBs, etc. — through society.

An SFA identifies these entry points and quantifies how much of and where the selected substance is released. Policy measures may address these entry points, e.g. by end‐of‐pipe technologies. Its general aim is to identify the most effective intervention points for policies of pollution prevention. According to Femia and Moll (2005), SFA aims to answer the following questions:

• Where and how much of substance X flows through a given system?

• How much of substance X flows to wastes?
• Where do flows of substance X end up?
• How much of substance X is stored in durable goods?
• Where could substance X be more efficiently utilised in technical processes?
• What are the options for substituting the harmful substance?
• Where do substances end up once they are released into the natural environment?

When an SFA is to be carried out, it involves the identification and collection of data on the one hand, and modelling on the other. According to van der Voet et al. (OECD, 2000), there are three possible ways to ‘model’ the system:

Accounting (or bookkeeping) The input for such a system is the data that can be obtained from trade and production statistics. If necessary, further detailed data can be recovered on the contents of the specific substances in those recorded goods and materials. Emissions and environmental fluxes or concentration monitoring can be used for assessing the environmental flows. The accounting overview may also serve as an identification system for missing or inaccurate data.

Missing amounts can be estimated by applying the mass balance principle. In this way, inflows and outflows are balanced for every node, as well as for the system as a whole, unless accumulation within the system can be proven. This technique is most commonly used in material flow studies, and can be viewed as a form of descriptive statistics. There are, however, some examples of case studies that specifically address societal stocks, and use these as indicator for possible environmental problems in the future (OECD, 2000).

Static modelling is the process whereby the network of flow nodes is translated into a mathematical ‘language’, i.e. a set of linear equations, describing the flows and accumulations as inter‐dependent. Emission factors and distribution factors over the various outputs for the economic processes and partition coefficients for the environmental compartments can be used as variables in the equations. A limited amount of substance flow accounting data is also required for a solution of the linear equations. However, the modelling outcome is determined largely by the substance distribution patterns.

Static modelling can be extended by including a so‐called origin analysis in which the origins of one specific problematic flow can be traced on several levels. Three levels may be distinguished:

• direct causes derived directly from the nodes balance (e.g one of the direct causes of cadmium (Cd) load in soil is atmospheric deposition);

• economic sectors (or environmental policy target groups) directly responsible for the problem. This is identified by following the path back from node to node to the point of emission (e.g. waste incineration is one of the economic sectors responsible for the cadmium load in soil);

• ultimate origins found by following the path back to the system boundaries (e.g. the extraction, transport, processing and trade of zinc (Zn) ore is one of the ultimate origins of the cadmium load in soil).

Furthermore, the effectiveness of abatement measures can be assessed with static modelling by recording timelines on substances (OECD, 2000).

Dynamic modelling is different to the static SFA model, as it includes substance stocks accumulated in society as well as in various materials and products in households and across the built‐up environments.

For SFA, stocks play an important role in the prediction of future emissions and waste flows of products with a long life span. For example, in the case of societal stocks of PVC, policy makers need to be supplied with information about future PVC outflows. Today’s stocks become tomorrow’s emissions and waste flows. Studies have been carried out on the analysis of accumulated stocks of metals and other persistent toxics in the societal system. Such build‐ups can serve as an ‘early warning’ signal for future emissions and their potential effects, as one day these stocks may become obsolete and recognisably dangerous, e.g. as in the case of asbestos, CFCs, PCBs and mercury in chlor‐alkali cells. As the stocks are discarded, they end up as waste, emissions, factors of risks to environment and population. In some cases, this delay between inflow and outflow can be very long indeed.

Stocks of products no longer in use, but not yet discarded, are also important. These stocks could include: old radios, computers and/or other electronic equipment stored in basements or attics, out‐of‐use pipes still in the ground, obsolete stocks of chemicals no longer produced but still stored, such as lead paints and pesticides. These ‘hibernating stocks’ are likely to be very large, according to OECD estimates (2000). Estimating future emissions is a crucial issue if environmental policy makers are to anticipate problems and take timely, effective action. In order to do this, stocks cannot be ignored. Therefore, when using MFA or SFA models for forecasting, stocks should play a vital part. Flows and stocks interact with each other. Stocks grow when the inflows exceed the outflows of a (sub)‐system and certain outflows of a (sub)‐system are disproportional to the stocks.

For this dynamic model, additional information is needed for the time dimension of the variables, e.g. the life span of applications in the economy; the half life of compounds; the retention time in environmental compartments and so forth. Calculations can be made not only on the ‘intrinsic’ effectiveness of packages of measures, but also on their anticipated effects in a specific year in the future. They can also be made on the time
it takes for such measures to become effective. A dynamic model is therefore most suitable for scenario analysis, provided that the required data are available or can be estimated with adequate accuracy (OECD, 2000).

 

Life Cycle Analysis (LCA)

 

What is Life Cycle Assessment (LCA)?

As environmental awareness increases, industries and businesses are assessing how their activities affect the environment. Society has become concerned about the issues of natural resource depletion and environmental degradation. Many businesses have responded to this awareness by providing “greener” products and using “greener” processes. The environmental performance of products and processes has become a key issue, which is why some companies are investigating ways to minimize their effects on the environment. Many companies have found it advantageous to explore ways of moving beyond compliance using pollution prevention strategies and environmental management systems to improve their environmental performance. One such tool is LCA. This concept considers the entire life cycle of a product (Curran 1996).

Life cycle assessment is a “cradle-to-grave” approach for assessing industrial systems. “Cradle-to-grave” begins with the gathering of raw materials from the earth to create the product and ends at the point when all materials are returned to the earth. LCA evaluates all stages of a product’s life from the perspective that they are interdependent, meaning that one operation leads to the next. LCA enables the estimation of the cumulative environmental impacts resulting from all stages in the product life cycle, often including impacts not considered in more traditional analyses (e.g., raw material extraction, material transportation, ultimate product disposal, etc.). By including the impacts throughout the product life cycle, LCA provides a comprehensive view of the environmental aspects of the product or process and a more accurate picture of the true environmental trade-offs in product and process selection.

The term “life cycle” refers to the major activities in the course of the product’s life-span from its manufacture, use, and maintenance, to its final disposal, including the raw material acquisition required to manufacture the product. Exhibit 1-1 illustrates the possible life cycle stages that can be considered in an LCA and the typical inputs/outputs measured.

 

Methods of LCA

  • Process LCA
  • Economic Input Output LCA
  • Hybrid Approach

 

 

From Life cycle analysis (LCA) and sustainability assessment

 

mfa8

 

 

Material Input Output Network Analysis

  • PIOT (Physical Input Output Tables)
  • MIOT (Monetary Input Output Tables)
  • WIOT (Waste Input Output Tables
  • MRIO (Multi Regional Input Output)
  • SUT (Supply and Use Tables)

 

From Industrial ecology and input-output economics: An introduction

Although it was the pioneering contributions by Duchin (1990, 1992) that explicitly made the link between input–output economics and industrial ecology, developments in input– output economics had previously touched upon the core concept of industrial ecology.

Wassily Leontief himself incorporated key ideas of industrial ecology into an input– output framework. Leontief (1970) and Leontief and Ford (1972) proposed a model where the generation and the abatement of pollution are explicitly dealt with within an extended IO framework. This model, which combines both physical and monetary units in a single coefficient matrix, shows how pollutants generated by industries are treated by so-called ‘pollution abatement sectors.’ Although the model has been a subject of longstanding methodological discussions (Flick, 1974; Leontief, 1974; Lee, 1982), its structure captures the essence of industrial ecology concerns: abatement of environmental problems by exploiting inter-industry interactions. As a general framework, we believe that the model by Leontief (1970) and Leontief and Ford (1972) deserves credit as an archetype of the various models that have become widely referred to in the field of industrial ecology during the last decade, including mixed-unit IO, waste IO and hybrid Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) models (Duchin, 1990; Konijn et al., 1997; Joshi, 1999; Nakamura and Kondo, 2002; Kagawa et al., 2004; Suh, 2004b). Notably, Duchin (1990) deals with the conversion of wastes to useful products, which is precisely the aim of industrial ecology, and subsequently, as part of a study funded by the first AT&T industrial ecology fellowship program, with the recovery of plastic wastes in particular (Duchin and Lange, 1998). Duchin (1992) clarifies the quantity-price relationships in an input–output model (a theme to which she has repeatedly returned) and draws its implications for industrial ecology, which has traditionally been concerned exclusively with physical quantities.

Duchin and Lange (1994) evaluated the feasibility of the recommendations of the Brundtland Report for achieving sustainable development. For that, they developed an input–output model of the global economy with multiple regions and analyzed the consequences of the Brundtland assumptions about economic development and technological change for future material use and waste generation. Despite substantial improvements in material efficiency and pollution reduction, they found that these could not offset the impact of population growth and the improved standards of living endorsed by the authors of the Brundtland Report.

Another pioneering study that greatly influenced current industrial ecology research was described by Ayres and Kneese (1969) and Kneese et al. (1970), who applied the massbalance principle to the basic input–output structure, enabling a quantitative analysis of resource use and material flows of an economic system. The contribution by Ayres and Kneese is considered the first attempt to describe the metabolic structure of an economy in terms of mass flows (see Ayres, 1989; Haberl, 2001).

Since the 1990s, new work in the areas of economy-wide research about material flows, sometimes based on Physical Input–Output Tables (PIOTs), has propelled this line of research forward in at least four distinct directions: (1) systems conceptualization (Duchin, 1992; Duchin, 2005a); (2) development of methodology (Konijn et al., 1997; Nakamura and Kondo, 2002; Hoekstra, 2003; Suh, 2004c; Giljum et al., 2004; Giljum and Hubacek, 2004; Dietzenbacher, 2005; Dietzenbacher et al., 2005; Weisz and Duchin, 2005); (3) compilation of data (Kratterl and Kratena, 1990; Kratena et al., 1992; Pedersen, 1999; Ariyoshi and Moriguchi, 2003; Bringezu et al., 2003; Stahmer et al., 2003); and (4) applications (Duchin, 1990; Duchin and Lange, 1994, 1998; Hubacek and Giljum, 2003; Kagawa et al., 2004). PIOTs generally use a single unit of mass to describe physical flows among industrial sectors of a national economy. In principle, such PIOTs are capable of satisfying both column-wise and row-wise mass balances, providing a basis for locating materials within a national economy.3 A notable variation in this tradition, although it had long been used in input–output economic studies starting with the work of Leontief, is the mixed-unit IO table. Konijn et al. (1997) analyzed a number of metal flows in the Netherlands using a mixed-unit IO table, and Hoekstra (2003) further improved both the accounting framework and data. Unlike the original PIOTs, mixed-unit IOTs do not assure the existence of column-wise mass-balance, but they make it possible to address more complex questions. Lennox et al. (2004) present the Australian Stocks and Flows Framework (ASFF), where a dynamic IO model is implemented on the basis of a hybrid input–output table. These studies constitute an important pillar of industrial ecology that is generally referred to as Material Flow Analysis (MFA).4

Although the emphasis in industrial ecology has arguably been more on the materials side, energy issues are without doubt also among its major concerns. In this regard, energy input–output analysis must be considered another important pillar for the conceptual basis of ‘industrial energy metabolism.’ The oil shock in the 1970s stimulated extensive research on the structure of energy use, and various studies quantifying the energy associated with individual products were carried out (Berry and Fels, 1973; Chapman, 1974). Wright (1974) utilized Input–Output Analysis (IOA) for energy analysis, which previously had been dominated by process-based analysis (see also Hannon, 1974; Bullard and Herendeen, 1975; Bullard et al., 1978). The two schools of energy analysis, namely process analysis and IO energy analysis, were merged by Bullard and Pillarti (1976) into hybrid energy analysis (see also van Engelenburg et al., 1994; Wilting,1996). Another notable contribution to the area of energy analysis was made by Cleveland et al. (1984), who present a comprehensive analysis, using the US input–output tables, quantifying the interconnection of energy and economic activities from a biophysical standpoint (see Cleveland, 1999; Haberl, 2001; Kagawa and Inamura, 2004). These studies shed light on how an economy is structured by means of energy flows and informs certain approaches to studying climate change (see for example Proops et al., 1993; Wier et al., 2001).

What generally escapes attention in both input–output economics and industrial ecology, despite its relevance for both, is the field of Ecological Network Analysis (ENA). Since Lotka (1925) and Lindeman (1942), material flows and energy flows have been among the central issues in ecology. It was Hannon (1973) who first introduced concepts from input–output economics to analyze the structure of energy utilization in an ecosystem. Using an input–output framework, the complex interactions between trophic levels or ecosystem compartments can be modeled, taking all direct and indirect relationships between components into account. Hannon’s approach was adopted, modified and re-introduced by various ecologists. Finn (1976, 1977), among others, developed a set of analytical measures to characterize the structure of an ecosystem using a rather extensive reformulation of the approach proposed by Hannon (1973). Another important development in the tradition of ENA is so-called environ analysis. Patten (1982) proposed the term ‘environ’ to refer to the relative interdependency between ecosystem components in terms of nutrient or energy flows. Results of environ analysis are generally presented as a comprehensive network flow diagram, which shows the relative magnitudes of material or energy flows between the ecosystem components through direct and indirect relationships (Levine, 1980; Patten, 1982). Ulanowicz and colleagues have broadened the scope of materials and energy flow analysis both conceptually and empirically (Szyrmer and Ulanowicz, 1987). Recently Bailey et al. (2004a, b) made use of the ENA tradition to analyze the flows of several metals through the US economy. Suh (2005) discusses the relationship between ENA and IOA and shows that Patten’s environ analysis is similar to Structural Path Analysis (SPA), and that the ENA framework tends to converge toward the Ghoshian framework rather than the Leontief framework although using a different formalism (Defourny and Thorbecke, 1984; Ghosh, 1958).

 

 

From Materials and energy flows in industry and ecosystem netwoks : life cycle assessment, input-output analysis, material flow analysis, ecological network flow analysis, and their combinations for industrial ecology

 

MFA

 

From Regional distribution and losses of end-of-life steel throughout
multiple product life cycles—Insights from the global multiregional
MaTrace model

mfa4

From Feasibility assessment of using the substance flow analysis methodology for chemicals information at macro level

 

mfa2MFA3

 

Sankey Diagram

From Hybrid Sankey diagrams: Visual analysis of multidimensional data for understanding resource use

Sankey diagrams are used to visualise flows of energy, materials or other resources in a variety of applications. Schmidt (2008a) reviewed the history and uses of these diagrams. Originally, they were used to show flows of energy, first in steam engines, more recently for modern systems such as power plants (e.g. Giuffrida et al., 2011) and also to give a big-picture view of global energy use (Cullen and Allwood, 2010). As well as energy, Sankey diagrams are widely used to show flows of resources (Schmidt, 2008a). Recent examples in this journal include global flows of tungsten (Leal-Ayala et al., 2015), biomass in Austria (Kalt, 2015), and the life-cycle of car components (Diener and Tillman, 2016). More widely, they have been used to show global production and use of steel and aluminium (Cullen et al., 2012; Cullen and Allwood, 2013), and flows of natural resources such as water (Curmi et al., 2013). In all of these cases, the essential features are: (1) the diagram represents physical flows, related to a given functional unit or period of time; and (2) the magnitude of flows is shown by the link1 widths, which are proportional to an extensive property of the flow such as mass or energy (Schmidt, 2008b). Creating these diagrams is supported by software tools such as e!Sankey (ifu Hamburg, 2017), and several Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) and Material Flow Analysis (MFA) packages include features to create Sankey diagrams.

 

From Hybrid Sankey diagrams: Visual analysis of multidimensional data for understanding resource use

 

mfa7

 

Please see my related posts:

Wassily Leontief and Input Output Analysis in Economics

Shell Oil’s Scenarios: Strategic Foresight and Scenario Planning for the Future

Water | Food | Energy | Nexus: Mega Trends and Scenarios for the Future

Stock Flow Consistent Input Output Models (SFCIO)

Measuring Globalization: Global Multi Region Input Output Data Bases (G-MRIO)

Production and Distribution Planning : Strategic, Global, and Integrated

Intra Industry Trade and International Production and Distribution Networks

Trends in Intra Firm Trade of USA

Development of Global Trade and Production Accounts: UN SEIGA Initiative

Accounting For Global Carbon Emission Chains

Stock Flow Consistent Models for Ecological Economics

Jay W. Forrester and System Dynamics

Classical roots of Interdependence in Economics

Stock-Flow Consistent Modeling

 

 

 

 

Key Sources of Research:

SPECIAL SESSION ON MATERIAL FLOW ACCOUNTING

OECD

Paris, 24 October 2000

https://www.oecd.org/env/indicators-modelling-outlooks/4425421.pdf

An Innovative Accounting Framework for the Food-Energy-Water Nexus
Application of the MuSIASEM approach to three case studies

http://www.fao.org/docrep/019/i3468e/i3468e.pdf

Creating your own online data visualizations: SankeyMatic, OMAT, CartoDB

https://metabolismofcities.org/blog/4-creating-your-own-online-data-visualizations

Hybrid Sankey diagrams: Visual analysis of multidimensional data for understanding resource use

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0921344917301167

e!Sankey

Visualization of energy, cash and material flows with a Sankey diagram

https://www.ifu.com/en/e-sankey/sankey-diagrams/

UPIOM: A New Tool of MFA and Its Application to the Flow of Iron and Steel Associated with Car Production

https://pubs.acs.org/doi/pdf/10.1021/es1024299

Material flow analysis

WIKIPEDIA

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Material_flow_analysis

Economy-wide Material Flow Accounting. Introduction and Guide.

Version 1.0

Article · January 2015

Fridolin Krausmann, Helga Weisz, Nina Eisenmenger, Helmut Schütz, Willi Haas
and Anke Schaffartzik

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/272885234_Economy-wide_Material_Flow_Accounting_Introduction_and_Guide_Version_10

Society’s Metabolism The Intellectual History of Materials Flow Analysis,

Part II, 1970-1998

Marina Fischer-Kowalski and Walter Huttler

Institute for Intenliscipiimny
Studies of Austrian Universities
University of Vienna
Vienna, Austria

http://www.esf.edu/cue/documents/Fischer-Kowalski_Huttler_1998.pdf

“Society’s Metabolism. The Intellectual History of Material Flow Analysis,

Part I, 1860 – 1970″.

Fischer-Kowalski, M.

1998.

Journal of Industrial Ecology 2(1): 61-78

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/249481665_Society%27s_Metabolism_The_Intellectual_History_of_Materials_Flow_Analysis_Part_I_1860-_1970

Analysis on energy–water nexus by Sankey diagram: the case of Beijing

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/19443994.2013.768038

Unified Materials Information System (UMIS): An Integrated Material Stocks and Flows Data Structure

First published: 07 February 2018

 

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/jiec.12730

Material Flow Cost Accounting with Umberto®

Schmidt, A. Hache, B.; Herold, F.; Götze, U.

http://qucosa.de/fileadmin/data/qucosa/documents/10523/2-05_Material_Flow_Cost_Accounting.pdf

https://www.wef.uni-osnabrueck.de/wp-content/uploads/PRESENTATIONS/Plenary/WEF_Richards.pdf

Study on Data for a Raw Material System Analysis: Roadmap and Test of the Fully Operational MSA for Raw Materials

Final Report

BIO by Deloitte

(2015)

Prepared for the European Commission, DG GROW.

https://www.certifico.com/component/attachments/download/2886

Integrated Analysis of Energy, Material and Time Flows in Manufacturing Systems

 

https://ac.els-cdn.com/S2212827116305479/1-s2.0-S2212827116305479-main.pdf?_tid=90701061-86fc-4c11-b078-cb577d8f8bdf&acdnat=1525719999_9dcee960cd6033d950a583cea379539f

e! Sankey

Visualization of energy, cash and material flows with a Sankey diagram

The most popular software for creating Sankey diagrams. Visualize the cash, material & energy flow or value streams in your company or along the supply chain. Share these appealing diagrams in reports or presentations.

 

https://www.ifu.com/en/e-sankey/?gclid=CjwKCAjw8r_XBRBkEiwAjWGLlIcWq2pRigMmJLKAXP4-ndFXR9ik41MUp9ahFZL2M9Ht5CKtwKIvTRoCdbsQAvD_BwE

MATERIAL FLOW ANALYSIS WITH SOFTWARE STAN

Oliver Cencic* and Helmut Rechberger
Institute for Water Quality Resources and Waste Management
Vienna University of Technology
Vienna A-1040, Austria

https://www.sswm.info/sites/default/files/reference_attachments/CENCIC%20and%20RECHBERGER%202008%20Material%20Flow%20Analysis%20with%20Software%20STAN.pdf

Recovery of Key Metals in the Electronics Industry in the
People’s Republic of China: An Opportunity in Circularity
(Initial Findings)

January 2018

Created as Part of the Platform for Accelerating the Circular Economy

http://www3.weforum.org/docs/Environment_Team/39777_Recovery_Key_Metals_Electronics_Industry_China_Opportunity_Circularity_report_2018.pdf

Sankey diagram

WIKIPEDIA

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sankey_diagram

MATERIAL FLOWS IN THE UNITED STATES
A PHYSICAL ACCOUNTING OF THE U.S. INDUSTRIAL ECONOMY

DONALD ROGICH
AMY CASSARA
IDDO WERNICK
MARTA MIRANDA

WRI

http://pdf.wri.org/material_flows_in_the_united_states.pdf

Industrial ecology and input-output economics: An introduction

Sangwon Suh

2005

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Sangwon_Suh3/publication/24078824_Industrial_ecology_and_input-output_economics_An_introduction/links/0c960531f1d92f3705000000/Industrial-ecology-and-input-output-economics-An-introduction.pdf

A Handbook of Industrial Ecology

Robert Ayres

Leslie Ayres

http://pustaka.unp.ac.id/file/abstrak_kki/EBOOKS/A%20Handbook%20of%20Industrial%20Ecology.pdf#page=100

Physical and Monetary Input-Output Analysis:
What Makes the Difference?

Helga Weisz
Klagenfurt University
Faye Duchin
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/d946/ab5b067aacafe555acbc1e077b5b42e1fc92.pdf

Theory of materials and energy flow analysis in ecology and economics

Sangwon Suh

2005

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Sangwon_Suh3/publication/227009838_Materials_and_energy_flows_in_industry_and_ecosystem_networks/links/00b7d53595cb006cbb000000/Materials-and-energy-flows-in-industry-and-ecosystem-networks.pdf

Conceptual Foundations and Applications of Physical Input-Output Tables

Stefan Giljum

Hubacek Klaus

2009

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Hubacek_Klaus/publication/226286172_Conceptual_Foundations_and_Applications_of_Physical_Input-Output_Tables/links/0912f506c16a7d06af000000/Conceptual-Foundations-and-Applications-of-Physical-Input-Output-Tables.pdf

Alternative Approaches of Physical Input-Output Analysis to Estimate
Primary Material Inputs of Production and Consumption Activities

Stefan Giljum

Hubacek Klaus

2004

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Hubacek_Klaus/publication/24078801_Alternative_Approaches_of_Physical_Input-Output_Analysis_to_Estimate_Primary_Material_Inputs_of_Production_and_Consumption_Activities/links/00b7d51cc1257aba71000000.pdf

Industrial Ecology: A Critical Review

https://nature.berkeley.edu/orourke/PDF/IE.pdf

EXIOPOL – development and illustrative analyses of a detailed global
multiregional environmentally-extended supply and use table/input output
table

Article in Economic Systems Research · May 2013

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Jan_Oosterhaven/publication/281305069_EXIOPOL_-_development_and_illustrative_analyses_of_a_detailed_global_multiregional_environmentally-extended_supply_and_use_tableinput-output_table/links/561d652a08aecade1acb3bfc.pdf

Developing the Sectoral Environmental Database for Input- Output Analysis: Comprehensive Environmental Data Archive of the U.S.

Article in Economic Systems Research · December 2005

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Sangwon_Suh3/publication/24078829_Developing_the_Sectoral_Environmental_Database_for_Input-Output_Analysis_Comprehensive_Environmental_Data_Archive_of_the_US/links/0c960531f1d910cda1000000.pdf

The material basis of the global economy

Worldwide patterns of natural resource extraction and their
implications for sustainable resource use policies

Arno Behrens,⁎, Stefan Giljum, Jan Kovanda, Samuel Niza

https://eden.dei.uc.pt/~camara/files/iTEAM/Material_Basis.pdf

The Sankey Diagram in Energy and Material Flow Management

Part I: History

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/j.1530-9290.2008.00004.x

The Sankey Diagram in Energy and Material Flow Management

Part II: Methodology and Current Applications

First published: 28 April 2008

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1111/j.1530-9290.2008.00015.x

Material and Energy Flow Analysis

First published: 23 March 2010

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/ceat.201090015

8. Biophysical economics: from physiocracy to ecological economics and industrial
ecology

Cutler J Cleveland

Article · January 1999

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Cutler_Cleveland/publication/229055775_8_Biophysical_economics_from_physiocracy_to_ecological_economics_and_industrial_ecology/links/0deec51b7274ca0035000000.pdf

The Use of Input-Output Analysis in REAP to allocate Ecological Footprints and Material Flows to Final Consumption Categories

http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.457.7453&rep=rep1&type=pdf

Waste Input–Output Material Flow Analysis of Metals in the Japanese Economy

Shinichiro Nakamura1 and Kenichi Nakajima2

https://www.jim.or.jp/journal/e/pdf3/46/12/2550.pdf

A multi-regional environmental input-output model to quantify embodied material flows

Stefan Giljum a, Christian Lutz b,Ariane Jungnitz

https://www.iioa.org/conferences/16th/files/Papers/Giljum%20et%20al_IIOA.pdf

http://inforumweb.umd.edu/papers/conferences/2007/jungnitzgiljumlutz.pdf

Material Flow Accounting and Analysis (MFA)

A Valuable Tool for Analyses of Society-Nature Interrelationships

Entry prepared for the Internet Encyclopedia of Ecological Economics

Friedrich Hinterberger *, Stefan Giljum, Mark Hammer

Sustainable Europe Research Institute (SERI)

http://isecoeco.org/pdf/material.pdf

Human Ecology: Industrial Ecology

Faye Duchin
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Stephen H. Levine
Tufts University

http://www.economics.rpi.edu/workingpapers/rpi0603.pdf

Development of the Physical Input Monetary Output Model for Understanding Material Flows within Ecological -Economic Systems

XU Ming

2010

http://www.jorae.cn/fileup/PDF/2010010204.pdf

Accounting for raw material equivalents of traded goods

A comparison of input-output approaches in physical, monetary, and mixed units

https://www.aau.at/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/working-paper-87-web.pdf

Material Flow Accounts and Policy. Data for Sweden 2004

by: Annica Carlsson, Anders Wadeskog, Viveka Palm, Fredrik Kanlén Environmental Accounts, Statistics Sweden,

2006.

http://www.scb.se/statistik/_publikationer/mi1301_2004a01_br_mift0701.pdf

Economy-wide Material Flow Accounts with Hidden Flows for Finland: 1945–2008

Jukka Hoffrén (ed.)

http://www.stat.fi/tup/julkaisut/tiedostot/isbn_978-952-244-233-8.pdf

EXIOBASE
Analysing environmental impacts of the global, interlinked economy

Konstantin Stadler, Richard Wood

Industrial Ecology Programme, NTNU, Norway

2014

http://www.syke.fi/download/noname/%7B3C267869-D6AE-447F-A98D-547C1D2B5819%7D/105511

ESSAYS ON INTERNATIONAL TRADE AND ENVIRONMENT
An Input-Output Analysis

http://repositorio.conicyt.cl/bitstream/handle/10533/179687/MUNOZ_PABLO_2868D.pdf?sequence=1

Using Material Flow Analysis for Sustainable Materials Management: Part of the Equation for Priority Setting

Frederick W. Allen

Priscilla A. Halloran

Angela H. Leith

M. Clare Lindsay

https://digitalcommons.unl.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?referer=&httpsredir=1&article=1113&context=usepapapers

“Supply-Extension versus Use-Extension in Environmentally Extended Input-Output Modelling: Analyzing Physical Flows within the Austrian Economy”

Hanspeter Wieland*1, Nina Eisenmenger2, Dominik Wiedenhofer2, Martin Bruckner1

http://www.gws-os.com/downloads/ioworkshop/IO-Workshop-2017_Wieland_abstract.pdf

A Material Flow Analysis of Phosphorus in Japan
The Iron and Steel Industry as a Major Phosphorus Source

Kazuyo Matsubae-Yokoyama, Hironari Kubo, Kenichi Nakajima,
and Tetsuya Nagasaka

http://greenpi.info/files/articles/gpa_101_wa.pdf

Material Flows and Economic Development
Material Flow Analysis of the Hungarian Economy

http://pure.iiasa.ac.at/id/eprint/6729/1/IR-02-057.pdf

The material footprint of nations

Thomas O. Wiedmanna,b,c,1, Heinz Schandlb,d, Manfred Lenzenc, Daniel Moranc,e, Sangwon Suhf, James Westb, and Keiichiro Kanemotoc

http://www.pnas.org/content/pnas/112/20/6271.full.pdf

Calculation of direct and indirect material inputs by type of raw material and economic activities

Paper presented at the London Group Meeting
19 – 21 June 2006

Karl Schoer

Wiesbaden, July 2006

http://mdgs.un.org/unsd/envaccounting/ceea/archive/MFA/Raw_material_Germany.pdf

Waste Input-Output  (WIO) Table

Shinichiro NAKAMURA and Yasushi KONDO,

Waste Input-Output Analysis: Concepts and Application to Industrial Ecology.

In Series: Eco-Efficiency in Industry and Science,

Vol. 26, Springer, February 2009.

http://www.f.waseda.jp/nakashin/WIO.html

Economy Wide Material Flow Accounting (EW-MFA)

http://data.geus.dk/MICASheetsEditor/document/21e5c517-53b9-4b00-b7a3-55939829824b

Material flow analyses in technosphere and biosphere
– metals, natural resources and chemical products

Viveka Palm

http://www.diva-portal.org/smash/get/diva2:9105/FULLTEXT01.pdf

The UK waste input-output table: Linking waste generation to the UK economy.

Salemdeeb, R., Al-Tabbaa, A. and Reynolds, C.

Waste Management & Research, 34 (10). pp. 1089-1094.

http://eprints.whiterose.ac.uk/105894/13/Re_Main_Document.pdf

Multiregion input / output tables and material footprint accounts session

Discussion of aspects of of MRIO / material footprinting work, and considerations for developing and resource based economies.

James West | Senior experimental scientist
25 May 2016

http://www.switch-asia.eu/fileadmin/user_upload/RPSC/event/23-25May16-Mongolia/24-25May/10_MFand_MRIO_CSIRO_English.pdf

Construction of hybrid Input-Output tables for E3 CGE model calibration and consequences on energy policy analysis

COMBET Emmanuel – CIRED
GHERSI Frédéric – CIRED
LEFEVRE Julien – CIRED
LE TREUT Gaëlle – CIRED

https://www.gtap.agecon.purdue.edu/resources/download/6988.pdf

Prospects and Drivers of Future European Resource Requirements
Evidence from a Multi-National Macroeconomic Simulation Study*

Paper prepared for the final WIOD Conference
Groningen, April 2012
by
Martin Distelkamp, Mark Meyer** and Bernd Meyer

GWS mbH Osnabrueck

http://www.wiod.org/conferences/groningen/Paper_Distelkamp_et_al.pdf

Material Flow Analysis to Evaluate Sustainability in Supply Chains

Haroune Zaghdaoui, Anicia Jaegler, Natacha Gondran, Jairo Montoya-Torres

https://hal-emse.ccsd.cnrs.fr/emse-01633801/file/4189.pdf

Physical and monetary input–output analysis: What makes the difference?

Helga Weisz , Faye Duchin

https://www.peakoil.net/files/Physical%20and%20monetary%20input-output.pdf

Recycling and Remanufacturing in Input-Output Models

Randall W Jackson, West Virginia University
Taelim Choi, Georgia Institute of Technology
Nancey Green Leigh, Georgia Institute of Technology

http://rri.wvu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/WP2008-4.pdf

The Water Footprint Assessment Manual

http://waterfootprint.org/media/downloads/TheWaterFootprintAssessmentManual_2.pdf

The New Plastics Economy
Rethinking the future of plastics

http://www3.weforum.org/docs/WEF_The_New_Plastics_Economy.pdf

A Comparison of Environmental Extended Input-Output (EEIO) and Process Data in Life Cycle Assessment

https://www.climateearth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/Comparing-Input-Output-and-Process-LCA-Data.CE-form2-LM-edits.pdf

Managing Logistics Flows Through Enterprise Input-Output Models

V. Albino1, A. Messeni Petruzzelli1 and O. G. Okogbaa2

http://cdn.intechopen.com/pdfs/6161/InTech-Managing_logistics_flows_through_enterprise_input_output_models.pdf

Social Metabolism and Accounting Approaches

Module:ECOLECON

Ecological economics

https://proxy.eplanete.net/galleries/broceliande7/social-metabolism-and-accounting-approaches

Input-Output Analysis in Laptop Computer Manufacturing

https://waset.org/publications/9998422/input-output-analysis-in-laptop-computer-manufacturing

IRON, STEEL AND ALUMINIUM IN THE UK: MATERIAL FLOWS AND THEIR
ECONOMIC DIMENSIONS

Final Project Report, March 2004

https://www.surrey.ac.uk/ces/files/pdf/0304_WP_Biffaward_Steel_Al-Final.pdf

A Framework for Sustainable Materials Management

Joseph Fiksel

http://www.eco-nomics.com/images/Framework_for_SMM.pdf

Energy and water conservation synergy in China: 2007–2012

Yi Jina, Xu Tanga,⁎, Cuiyang Fenga, Mikael Höökb

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Yi_Jin51/publication/320073178_Energy_and_water_conservation_synergy_in_China_2007-2012/links/59cc5c13a6fdcc451d5cf2b5/Energy-and-water-conservation-synergy-in-China-2007-2012.pdf

Contributions of Material and Energy Flow Accounting to Urban Ecosystems Analysis: Case Study Singapore

Niels B. Schulz

http://archive.unu.edu/hq/library/Collection/PDF_files/IAS/IAS-WP136.pdf

A review of recent multi-region input–output models used for consumption-based
emission and resource accounting

Thomas Wiedmann

http://wedocs.unep.org/bitstream/handle/20.500.11822/19433/a_review.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y

Physical Input Output (PIOT) Tables:  Developments and Future

http://iioa.org/conferences/18th/papers/files/35_20100427111_Hoekstra-PIOT.pdf

Materials and energy flows in industry and ecosystem netwoks : life cycle assessment, input-output analysis, material flow analysis, ecological network flow analysis, and their combinations for industrial ecology

Suh, S,

2004

https://openaccess.leidenuniv.nl/handle/1887/8399

Applying Ecological Input‐Output Flow Analysis to Material Flows in Industrial Systems: Part I: Tracing Flows

First published: 08 February 2008

Applying Ecological Input‐Output Flow Analysis to Material Flows in Industrial Systems: Part II: Flow Metrics

First published: 08 February 2008

Local systems, global impacts
Using life cycle assessment to analyse the
potential and constraints of industrial symbioses

rising to global challenges

25 Years of Industrial Ecology

 https://is4ie.org/resources/documents/4/download

Literature study on Industrial Ecology

Gerard Fernandez Gonzalez

 

https://upcommons.upc.edu/bitstream/handle/2117/77035/Final%20version%20-%20Document.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y

 

 

 

 

 

Practical Handbook of MATERIAL FLOW ANALYSIS

Paul H. Brunner and Helmut Rechberger

Handbook of Input-Output Economics in Industrial Ecology


 
edited by Sangwon Suh

Taking Stock of Industrial Ecology

edited by Roland Clift, Angela Druckman

Ecological Input-Output Analysis-Based Sustainability Analysis of Industrial Systems

 

Cristina Piluso and Yinlun Huang*

 

Helen H. Lou

An Extended Model for Tracking Accumulation Pathways of Materials Using Input–Output Tables: Application to Copper Flows in Japan

Ryosuke Yokoi * ID , Jun Nakatani ID and Yuichi Moriguchi
2008

TRACING MATERIAL FLOWS ON INDUSTRIAL SITES

Kálmán KÓSI and András TORMA
2005

 

 

 

Metabolism of Cities

 

https://metabolismofcities.org

 

 

 

 

 

Feasibility assessment of using the substance flow analysis methodology for chemicals information at macro level

 

https://www.eea.europa.eu/publications/technical_report_2007_1/file

 

 

 

Structural Investigation of Aluminum in the US Economy using Network Analysis

Philip Nuss, Wei-Qiang Chen Hajime Ohno, and T.E. Graedel

 

http://philip.nuss.me/wp-content/uploads/2016_SA_Network-Analysis-Aluminum_EST.pdf

 

 

 

 

Economy-wide Material Flow Analysis and Indicators

http://www.umweltgesamtrechnung.at/ms/ugr/ugr_en/ugr_physicalaccounts/ugr_materialflowaccounts/

 

 

 

 

Regional distribution and losses of end-of-life steel throughout
multiple product life cycles—Insights from the global multiregional
MaTrace model

 

Stefan Pauliuka,∗, Yasushi Kondob, Shinichiro Nakamurab, Kenichi Nakajimac

 

https://ac.els-cdn.com/S0921344916302774/1-s2.0-S0921344916302774-main.pdf?_tid=838ffb90-95a9-4f3a-a617-f619f32d4558&acdnat=1531385937_3f722f2c2f71337c47a1024b0c841d16

 

 

 

 

MaTrace: Tracing the Fate of Materials over Time and Across Products in Open-Loop Recycling

Shinichiro Nakamura,*,† Yasushi Kondo,† Shigemi Kagawa,‡ Kazuyo Matsubae,§ Kenichi Nakajima,⊥ and Tetsuya Nagasaka§

https://pubs.acs.org/doi/pdf/10.1021/es500820h

 

 

 

 

 

Tracing China’s energy flow and carbon dioxide flow based on Sankey diagrams

 

Feiyin Wang1,2 • Pengtao Wang1,2 • Xiaomeng Xu1,2 • Lihui Dong1,2 • Honglai Xue1,2 • Shuai Fu1,2 • Yingxu Ji

 

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Xiaomeng_Xu7/publication/318642022_Tracing_China%27s_energy_flow_and_carbon_dioxide_flow_based_on_Sankey_diagrams/links/5a59cd7f458515450270f982/Tracing-Chinas-energy-flow-and-carbon-dioxide-flow-based-on-Sankey-diagrams.pdf

 

 

 

 

Materials Flow and Sustainability

USGS

 

 

 

Life-cycle assessment

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Life-cycle_assessment

 

 

 

 

LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT: PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE

Scientific Applications International Corporation (SAIC) 11251 Roger Bacon Drive
Reston, VA 20190

 

http://www.epa.gov/nrmrl/lcaccess/pdfs/chapter1_frontmatter_lca101.pdf

 

 

 

 

Life cycle analysis (LCA) and sustainability assessment

 

http://www4.ncsu.edu/~richardv/documents/IntroductiontoLCAAU32013.pdf

The Hidden Geometry of Trade Networks

The Hidden Geometry of Trade Networks

 

From The hidden hyperbolic geometry of international trade: World Trade Atlas 1870–2013

Tradenetwork

 

Key Terms:

  • Trade Networks
  • Complex Networks
  • Preferential Attachment
  • Positive Feedback
  • Fractals
  • Power Laws
  • Hyperbolic Geometry
  • Economic Geography
  • Regional Trading Blocks
  • Bilateral Trade
  • Multilateral Trade
  • Free Trade Agreements
  • Metabolism of a City
  • Metabolism of a Nation
  • Metabolism of the World
  • Industrial Ecology
  • Social Ecology
  • Growth and Form

 

 

From The hidden hyperbolic geometry of international trade: World Trade Atlas 1870–2013

Here, we present the World Trade Atlas 1870–2013, a collection of annual world trade maps in which distance combines economic size and the different dimensions that affect international trade beyond mere geography. Trade distances, based on a gravity model predicting the existence of significant trade channels, are such that the closer countries are in trade space, the greater their chance of becoming connected. The atlas provides us with information regarding the long-term evolution of the international trade system and demonstrates that, in terms of trade, the world is not flat but hyperbolic, as a reflection of its complex architecture. The departure from flatness has been increasing since World War I, meaning that differences in trade distances are growing and trade networks are becoming more hierarchical. Smaller-scale economies are moving away from other countries except for the largest economies; meanwhile those large economies are increasing their chances of becoming connected worldwide. At the same time, Preferential Trade Agreements do not fit in perfectly with natural communities within the trade space and have not necessarily reduced internal trade barriers. We discuss an interpretation in terms of globalization, hierarchization, and localization; three simultaneous forces that shape the international trade system.

From The hidden hyperbolic geometry of international trade: World Trade Atlas 1870–2013

When it comes to international trade, the evidence suggests that we are far from a distance-free world. Distance still matters1 and in many dimensions: cultural, administrative or political, economic, and geographic. This is widely supported by empirical evidence concerning the magnitude of bilateral trade flows. The gravity model of trade2–4, in analogy to Newton’s law of gravitation, accurately predicts that the volume of trade exchanged between two countries increases with their economic sizes and decreases with their geographical separation. The precision of that model improves when it is supplemented with other factors, such as colony–colonizer relationships, a shared common language, or the effects of political borders and a common currency5–7. Despite the success of the gravity model at replicating trade volumes, it performs very poorly at predicting the existence of a trade connection between a given pair of countries8; an obvious limitation that prevents it from explaining the striking regularities observed in the complex architecture of the world trade web9–13. One of the reasons for this flaw is that the gravity model focuses on detached bilateral relationships and so overlooks multilateral trade resistance and other network effects14.

Another drawback of the classical gravity model is that geography is not the only factor that defines distance in international trade. Here, we use a systems approach based on network science methodologies15,16 to propose a gravity model for the existence of significant trade channels between pairs of countries in the world. The gravity model is based on economic sizes and on an effective distance which incorporates different dimensions that affect international trade, not only geography, implicitly encoded on the complex patterns of trade interactions. Our gravity model is based on the connectivity law proposed for complex networks with underlying metric spaces17,18 and it can be represented in a pure geometric approach using a hyperbolic space, which has been conjectured as the natural geometry underlying complex networks19–22. In the hyperbolic trade space, distance combines economic size and effective distance into a sole distance metric, such that the closer countries are in hyperbolic trade space, the greater their chance of becoming connected. We estimate this trade distance from empirical data using adapted statistical inference techniques23,24, which allow us to represent international trade through World Trade Maps (WTMs). These define a coordinate system in which countries are located in relative positions according to the aggregate trade barriers between them. The maps are annual and cover a time span of fourteen decades. The collection as a whole, referred to as the World Trade Atlas 1870–2013, is presented via spatial projections25, Table S5, and trade distance matrices, Table S6. Beyond the obvious advantages of visualization, the World Trade Atlas 1870–2013 significantly increases our understanding of the long-term evolution of the international trade system and helps us to address a number of important and challenging questions. In particular: How far, in terms of trade, have countries traveled in recent history? What role does each country play in the maps and how have those roles evolved over time? Are Preferential Trade Agreements (PTAs) consistent with natural communities as measured by trade distances? Has the formation of PTAs led to lesser or greater barriers to trade within blocs? Is trade distance becoming increasingly irrelevant?

The answers to these questions can be summarized by asserting that, in terms of trade, the world is not flat; it is hyperbolic. Differences in trade distances are growing and becoming more heterogeneous and hierarchical; at the same time as they define natural trade communities—not fully consistent with PTAs. Countries are becoming more interconnected and clustered into hierarchical trade blocs than ever before.

Please see my related posts:

Networks and Hierarchies

Increasing Returns, Path Dependence, Circular and Cumulative Causation in Economics

Relational Turn in Economic Geography

Boundaries and Networks

Multilevel Approach to Research in Organizations

Regional Trading Blocs and Economic Integration

Increasing Returns and Path Dependence in Economics

Growth and Form in Nature: Power Laws and Fractals

Key Sources of Research:

 

The hidden hyperbolic geometry of international trade: World Trade Atlas 1870–2013

Guillermo García-Pérez  Marián Boguñá, Antoine Allard & M. Ángeles Serrano

2016

https://www.nature.com/articles/srep33441.pdf

 

 

Uncovering the hidden geometry behind metabolic networks

 

Molecular BioSystems · March 2012

 

http://complex.ffn.ub.es/~mbogunya/eotools_files/files/1109.1934.pdf

 

 

The hidden geometry of complex networks

M. ÁNGELES SERRANO

 

http://www.ccs2016.org/uploads/4/8/7/6/48769845/s1_to_pdf.pdf

http://www.crm.cat/en/Activities/Documents/Curs_Intro_networks.pdf

 

 

 

Deciphering the global organization of clustering in real complex networks

Pol Colomer-de-Simo ́n1, M. A ́ ngeles Serrano1, Mariano G. Beiro ́2, J. Ignacio Alvarez-Hamelin2 & Maria ́n Bogun ̃a ́1

 

https://www.nature.com/articles/srep02517.pdf

 

 

 

 

 

Hidden geometric correlations in real multiplex networks

 

Kaj-KoljaKleineberg,1,∗ Mari ́anBogun ̃ ́a,1 M.A ́ngelesSerrano,2,1 andFragkiskosPapadopoulos

https://arxiv.org/pdf/1601.04071.pdf

 

 

 

 

 

Emergent Hyperbolic Network Geometry

Ginestra Bianconi1 & Christoph Rahmede

 

https://www.nature.com/articles/srep41974.pdf

 

 

 

 

The geometric nature of weights in real complex networks

 

Antoine Allard1,2, M. A ́ngeles Serrano1,2,3, Guillermo Garc ́ıa-Pe ́rez1,2 & Maria ́n Bogun ̃a ́

https://www.nature.com/articles/ncomms14103.pdf

 

 

 

Network Geometry and Complexity

Daan Mulder · Ginestra Bianconi

 

https://arxiv.org/pdf/1711.06290.pdf

 

 

 

Multiscale unfolding of real networks by geometric renormalization

 

Guillermo Garc ́ıa-P ́erez,1,2 Mari ́an Bogun ̃ ́a,1,2 and M. A ́ngeles Serrano

 

https://arxiv.org/pdf/1706.00394.pdf

 

 

 

Topology of the World Trade Web

Ma A ́ngeles Serrano and Mari ́an Bogun ̃a ́

 

https://arxiv.org/pdf/cond-mat/0301015.pdf

 

 

Patterns of dominant flows in the world trade web

 

M. A ́ngeles Serrano,1 Mari ́an Bogun ̃ ́a,2 and Alessandro Vespignani3,4

 

https://arxiv.org/pdf/0704.1225.pdf

 

 

 

 

Clustering and the hyperbolic geometry of complex networks

Elisabetta Candellero and Nikolaos Fountoulakis

 

https://warwick.ac.uk/fac/sci/statistics/staff/academic-research/candellero/paper8waw14.pdf

 

 

 

 

Hyperbolic Geometry of Complex Networks

 

Dmitri Krioukov, Fragkiskos Papadopoulos, Maksim Kitsak, Amin Vahdat, and Mari ́an Boguna

https://www.caida.org/publications/papers/2010/hyperbolic_geometry_complex/hyperbolic_geometry_complex.pdf

 

 

 

 

 

On Hyperbolic Geometry Structure of Complex Networks

Wenjie Fang

 

https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/2f68/531c6644768ad78e86843e297fed442769cb.pdf

 

USA and China: What are Trade in Value Added (TiVA) Balances

USA and China: What are Trade in Value Added (TiVA) Balances

 

Changes in Global Trade

  • Global Value Chains
  • Production Fragmentation
  • Vertical Specialization
  • Value added content of Trade

 

FROM INTERCONNECTED ECONOMIES : BENEFITING FROM INDUSTRY GLOBALISATION

TIVA4TIVA5

 

From Domestic Value Added in Chinese Exports

 

TIVA12

 

From Measurement and Determinants of Trade in Value Added

 

TIVA11

 

From OECD WTO TIVA

TIVA13

 

Ongoing TiVA Projects

  • OECD TIVA Initiative
  • EU FIGARO Initiative
  • NA TIVA Initiative
  • APEC TiVA Initiative

 

There is also OECD TiVA – MNE Project which incorporates Intra Firm trade of MNEs.

 

From An Overview on the Construction of North American Regional Supply-Use and Input-Output Tables and their Applications in Policy Analysis

Introduction

Trade-in-Value Added (TiVA) is a statistical approach used to measure the interconnectivity and marginal contribution in production of participating economies in global value chains (GVCs) (Degain and Maurer, 2015). The advantage of TiVA over traditional trade statistics is that TiVA measures trade flows consistent with internationally, vertically integrated global production networks, often called GVCs. TiVA statistics allow us to better analyze three aspects of international trade: measuring the contribution of domestic versus foreign intermediates in the exports, tracing production across countries to their final destination, and finally quantifying how individual industries contribute to producing exports (Lewis, 2013).

TiVA statistics allow us to map and quantify the interdependencies between industries and economies, and help us develop better estimates of the contribution from each country in the production processes and, consequently, better measure the impact from GVC engagement for domestic economies. However, it is necessary to highlight the underlying compilation methodology of TiVA in order to better understand the characteristics, scope and interpretation of TiVA. Hence, it is important to remember that TiVA statistics are estimated statistics that are derived, in part, from official statistics. TiVA statistics are meant to complement but not to replace official statistics.

Measuring trade flows in value added as opposed to gross value of trade flows has become increasingly important as the influence that GVCs has on international trade continues to rise. (Johnson, 2014; Ahmad and Ribarsky, 2014). The proliferation of GVCs means that production has become increasingly fragmented and vertically integrated across countries (Jones and Kierzkowski, 1988; Hummels, Ishii, and Yi, 2001; OECD, 2013). At the micro level, this means that many firms in disparate countries are interconnected. Across international borders, these firms take part in particular stages of the production process, together forming a global supply chain. As a result, intermediate inputs may cross international borders several times before being used to produce final consumable goods. This matters for several reasons. First, when goods cross multiple borders multiple times, they are exposed to more trade costs, which accumulate and compound before the goods are sold for final consumption. Additionally, traditional gross trade flows are overstated because gross trade flows may count intermediates multiple times. Relatedly, gross trade flows obscure the marginal contributions of countries along GVCs. TiVA measures the flows related to the value that is added at each stage of production by each country and maps from where value is created, where it is exported, and how it is used, as final consumption or as an input for future exports. How we understand gains from trade from trade flows is fundamental, and value-added approaches lead to better understanding of GVCs and their role in international trade.

There are two ways to capture TiVA. The first method is a direct approach, which decomposes existing data on trade statistics. Johnson (2012) introduce a TiVA indicator using value-added to output ratios from the source country to compute the value-added associated with the implicit output transfer to each destination. Koopman, Wang, and Wei (2014) build on the literature in vertical specialization (e.g. Hummels, Ishii, and Yi 2001) and the literature on TiVA (e.g. Johnson and Noguera, 2012; Daudin, Rifflart, and Schweisguth, 2011) to implement a complete decomposition of a country’s gross exports by value added components. This work has evolved into a second, indirect method of capturing TiVA. The indirect method is employed in the regional North American supply-use table (NASUT) and the regional North American inter-country input-output table (NAIOT). Estimating TiVA this way relies on national and international input-output tables as well as bilateral trade statistics to derive the international intermediate and final supply-demand matrices. These matrices reveal the origin and use of goods and services produced and exchanged among the countries and industries within the table domain. Other major international input-output tables include the Asian International Input-Output (AIO) Tables published by the Institute of Developing Economies Japan External Trade Organization (IDE-JETRO), the Inter-Country Input-Output (ICIO) Tables published by the OECD, the World Input-Output Tables (WIOT) published by the World Input-Output Database (WIOD) project, and the Eora Multi-region Input-Output Database (Eora MRIO).

The studies based on the above two approaches have revealed a trend of rising foreign value-added content in international trade flows and the resulting implications for trade policies. Johnson and Noguera (2016) find that value-added exports are falling relative to gross exports, which means that double-counting is increasingly more common in trade flows. This is consistent with increased GVC activity. Hummels, Ishii, and Yi (2001) show that vertical specialization has grown about 30 percent and accounts for about one-third of the growth in trade from about 1970 to 1990.

In recent years, more than half of global manufacturing imports are intermediate goods and more than 70 percent of global services imports are intermediate services (OECD, 2013). This is relevant because tariffs (and other trade costs) have a higher impact on the cost of GVC activity. Each time an intermediate input crosses an international border as part of the production process, the input incurs trade costs. As first observed by Yi (2003), trade costs are compounded when intermediate goods cross borders multiple times to complete the production process. Rouzet and Miroudot (2013) demonstrate that small tariffs can add up to a significant sum by the time a finished product reaches its consumers. Other trade costs such as non-tariff measures also have such accumulative effect on downstream products.

What the literature indicates the trends in GVCs mean for trade flows, generally, are two-fold. First, with the growth of GVC activity, gross value of trade flows will continue to be larger than the value of final goods that cross borders. Second, trade policy designed with respect to gross trade flows could have the potential to be overly restrictive or even impose costs indirectly on domestic production. Trade-in-Value Added thus provides a supplementary, relevant reference for evaluating the economic effect of trade policies.

In this paper, we introduce the North American Trade-in-Value Added (NA-TiVA) project, a trilateral, multiyear initiative that aims to produce a regional TiVA database that maps the value chains connecting Canada, the United States, and Mexico. Furthermore, we introduce and discuss the project’s deliverables, the agencies involved, how the NA-TiVA project complements other ongoing TiVA initiatives around the world, the technical framework for producing a regional inter-country input-output table for the NA region, and the value of this work to resolving open policy questions within international trade.

Ongoing TiVA Initiatives

Currently there are three major ongoing global and regional TiVA projects that are related to the North America TiVA project. They are the World Input-Output database (WIOD), OECD-WTO TiVA, and APEC TiVA initiatives.

The World Input-Output database (WIOD): The official WIOD project ran from May 1, 2009 to May 1, 2012, as a joint effort of eleven European research institutions. It was funded by the European Commission. Under the official WIOD project, the accounting framework and methodologies of constructing the TiVA databases, as well as the first version of the World Input-Output database were developed. The database was officially launched in April 2012. Since then, two additional versions of WIOD databases, namely the 2013 and 2016 Releases, were published. The 2016 Released database covers 28 EU countries and 15 other major economies in the world for years 2000-2014 with 56 industries.

The OECD-WTO TiVA database: The Organization for Economic Cooperate and Development (OECD) and World Trade Organization (WTO) undertook a joint initiative on TiVA in 2013. Since then, two versions of TiVA databases have been released (2013 and 2015 release). The 2015 release of OECD-WTO TiVA database covers 61 countries and 13 regions, with 34 industries, for years 1995, 2000, 2005, 2008-2011.

APEC TiVA initiative: In 2014, APEC economic leaders endorsed the APEC TiVA database initiative, a four-year project co-led by China and the United States. Under this project, an APEC TiVA database would be constructed by the end of 2018, covering 21 APEC economies.

Each of these three major global and regional TiVA initiatives include Canada, Mexico, and the United States. In the light of this, why is there still a need for constructing the NA TiVA database? What kind of additional value can the NA TiVA project bring to this global and regional network of TiVA initiatives?

The NA-TiVA project was motivated by regional statistical developments and continuous improvements in compiling TiVA databases. The 2003 Mexican input-output table distinguishes trade flows by domestic producers and production undertaken in Maquiladoras, a tax-free, tariff-free special processing zone, which allowed the estimates of separate production coefficients and thus TiVA measures for these two distinctive zones in Mexico (Koopman, Powers, Wang, and Wei, 2010; De la Cruz, Koopman, Wang, and Wei, 2011). The government of Canada further highlighted the importance and relevance of global value chains in the publication of a book assessing the impact and implication of GVCs (Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada, 2011); and as of the 2015 edition of the OECD’s ICIO tables, Mexico is broken out as Mexico Global Manufacturers and Mexico Non-Global Manufacturers. This NA TiVA project builds off of these developments.

Constructing inter-country input-output tables, or so called TiVA databases, requires the harmonization of national supply-use tables (SUTs) or input-output tables (IOTs) as well as bilateral trade statistics from different countries. However, the data produced by countries often vary greatly in the level of detail and differ in industry and product classifications. Thus, the more countries are included in a global or regional TiVA project, the higher level of aggregation would be required for the purpose of harmonization. With only three countries involved, it is feasible for the NA TiVA database to include more products and sectors than other global and regional TiVA projects.

Moreover, other factors, such as all three countries adopt the same industry and product classifications (e.g. using the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS)), and produce SUTS at similarly detailed levels, would ensure the compatibility of data components, and thus lead to better quality of the resulting NA TiVA database.

Finally, the NA TiVA project could synthesize the ongoing trilateral trade statistics reconciliation effort and produce better-quality balanced bilateral trade data to feed into other global and regional TiVA initiatives. One of the key inputs for constructing TiVA databases is balanced bilateral trade statistics. However, countries rarely report symmetric bilateral trade statisticsone country’s reported exports rarely equals its trading partner’s reported imports, and vice versa. To reconcile such asymmetries to produce balanced bilateral trade statistics, joint effort by both trading countries is warranted, including investigating the causes of asymmetries at detailed product level and making corresponding adjustment mechanically. However, global and regional TiVA initiatives often have to consider an incredible number of country pairs, making such an elaborate reconciliation practice rather infeasible. Thus, global and regional TiVA initiatives often turn to economic modelling to balance bilateral trade statistics which could be applied in a systematic way to all countries. Although such approach can be mathematically sound, the resulting data often require additional scrutiny, validation, and adjustment, as they do not always reflect the reality accurately. Canada, Mexico, and the United States have ongoing bilateral trade reconciliation. This NA TiVA project provides additional motivation and framework for this effort.

The History, Scope, and Major Objectives of the NA TiVA Initiative

In October 2014, the representatives from the United States, Canada, and Mexico met and kicked off the idea of constructing the NA TiVA database at a UN conference in Mexico. The main objective of this project is to construct the NA TiVA database by 2021 covering three NA countries with more detailed industry and firm information, and to improve the quality of TiVA measures for the value chains in the NA region.

The NA-TiVA project involves eight government agencies across the three NA countries: for Canada, Statistics Canada (STATCAN) and Global Affairs Canada; for Mexico, Instituto Nacional de Estadística y Geografía (INEGI) and Banco de Mexico; and for the United States, the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA), the U.S. Census Bureau (CENSUS), the U.S. International Trade Commission (USITC), and the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR).

In addition, because the resulting NA-TiVA database would be eventually integrated into the OECD-WTO TiVA database to improve the quality of information on the North American region, participants of the NA-TiVA project regularly meet with OECD representatives to harmonize TiVA database compilation methodologies, exchange data to synthesize the effort and ensure consistency across countries, and discuss best practices. Other international organizations, such as United Nations Statistics Division (UNSD), and WTO, are often consulted as well for national account and trade statistics related issues.

Under the NA-TiVA initiative, three parallel work streams have been established: The trade in goods and services reconciliation team, which is tasked to produce balanced bilateral trade statistics for goods and services; the SUT team, whose goal is to harmonize the national SUTs and compile the regional NASUTs and NAIOTs; and the White Paper team, the goal of which is to produce documentation that outlines the conceptual methodology, identifies major technical issues, describes policy applications of a NA-TiVA initiative, and details project outputs as well as future work.

FROM INTERCONNECTED ECONOMIES :BENEFITING FROM INDUSTRY GLOBALISATION

 

TIVA6

 

 

From Supply-Use Tables, Trade-in-Value-Added Initiatives, and their Applications

TIVATIVA2TIVA3

Please see my related posts:

Understanding Global Value Chains – G20/OECD/WB Initiative

The Collapse of Global Trade during Global Financial Crisis of 2008-2009

Development of Global Trade and Production Accounts: UN SEIGA Initiative

Trends in Intra Firm Trade of USA

Understanding Trade in Intermediate Goods

Intra Industry Trade and International Production and Distribution Networks

Production Chain Length and Boundary Crossings in Global Value Chains

 

Key Sources of Research:

The U.S.-China Bilateral Balance In Trade In Value Added

2017

https://seekingalpha.com/article/4048166-u-s-china-bilateral-balance-trade-value-added

 

 

 

 

Understanding the US-China Trade Relationship

Prepared for the US-China Business Council By Oxford Economics

January 2017

 

https://www.uschina.org/sites/default/files/OE%20US%20Jobs%20and%20China%20Trade%20Report.pdf

 

 

 

Implications and Interpretations of Value-Added Trade Balances

John B. Benedetto

2012

 

https://www.usitc.gov/publications/332/journals/implicationsand.pdf

 

 

The U.S.–China trade deficit—a value-added perspective

Demetrio Scopelliti

BLS

2013

https://www.bls.gov/opub/mlr/2013/beyond-bls/pdf/u-s-china-trade-deficit.pdf

 

 

 

The value-added content of trade

Robert Johnson, Guillermo Noguera

07 June 2011

 

https://voxeu.org/article/value-added-content-trade-new-insights-us-china-imbalance

 

 

 

Trade in Value-Added

December 3, 2013

Logan Lewis

 

https://www.federalreserve.gov/econresdata/notes/ifdp-notes/2013/trade-in-value-added-20131203.html

 

 

 

 

China-U.S. Trade Issues

Wayne M. Morrison

Specialist in Asian Trade and Finance
April 2, 2018

FAS

https://fas.org/sgp/crs/row/RL33536.pdf

 

 

 

The China Shock revisited: Insights from value added trade flows

Adam Jakubiky Victor Kummritzz

June 30, 2017

http://www.etsg.org/ETSG2017/papers/jk_draft.pdf

 

 

 

 

Measurement and Determinants of Trade in Value Added

Nakgyoon Choi

2013

https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2317706

 

 

 

 

OECD-WTO: Statistics on Trade in Value Added

OECD

https://www.oecd-ilibrary.org/trade/data/oecd-wto-statistics-on-trade-in-value-added_data-00648-en

 

 

 

 

NAFTA, VALUE ADDED AND TRADE-IN-TASKS

Antonio Rodriguez-Lopez

http://usmex.ucsd.edu/_files/NAFTA-essays/nafta-essays-rodriguez-lopez.pdf

 

 

 

Trade in Value Added and the Value Added in Trade

Robert Stehrer

http://www.wiod.org/conferences/brussels/Stehrer_background_2.pdf

 

 

 

 

US Trade Wars with Emerging Countries in the 21st Century: Make America and Its Partners Lose Again

Antoine Bouët (International Food Policy Research Institute, Washington, D.C., and Groupe de Recherche en Économie Théorique et Appliquée [GREThA], University of Bordeaux, France)
David Laborde (International Food Policy Research Institute)

2017

https://www.parisschoolofeconomics.eu/docs/koenig-pamina/article_us_tradewars_bouet_laborde_2017.pdf

 

 

 

Measuring Value Added in the People’s Republic of China’s Exports: A Direct Approach.

Xing, Y.

2014.

ADBI Working Paper 493. Tokyo: Asian Development Bank Institute

https://www.adb.org/sites/default/files/publication/156348/adbi-wp493.pdf

 

 

 

 

International Trade Costs, Global Supply Chains and Value-added Trade in
Australia

Gerard Kelly and Gianni La Cava
RDP 2014-07

 

https://www.rba.gov.au/publications/rdp/2014/pdf/rdp2014-07.pdf

 

 

 

Trade in Value Added Revisited: A Comment on R. Johnson and G. Noguera,
Accounting for Intermediates: Production Sharing and Trade in Value Added

 

Masaaki Kuboniwa
January, 2014

 

http://www.ier.hit-u.ac.jp/Common/publication/DP/DP598.pdf

 

 

 

 

How iPhone Widens the US Trade Deficits with PRC

Yuqing Xing
And
Neal Detert

Nov 2010
http://www3.grips.ac.jp/~pinc/data/10-21.pdf

 

 

 

 

Trade in value added (TIVA)

2012

https://dfat.gov.au/about-us/publications/Documents/trade-in-value-added-2012.pdf

 

 

Global Value Chains (GVCs)

OECD

http://www.oecd.org/sti/ind/global-value-chains.htm

 

 

 

INTERCONNECTED ECONOMIES: BENEFITING FROM GLOBAL VALUE CHAINS

SYNTHESIS REPORT

OECD

https://www.oecd.org/sti/ind/interconnected-economies-GVCs-synthesis.pdf

 

 

 

TRACING THE VALUE ADDED IN GLOBAL VALUE CHAINS:
PRODUCT-LEVEL CASE STUDIES IN CHINA

UNCTAD

http://unctad.org/en/PublicationsLibrary/ditctncd2015d1_en.pdf

 

 

 

 

The Growth of Chinese Exports:
An Examination of the Detailed Trade Data

Brett Berger
Robert F. Martin

US Federal Reserve

https://www.federalreserve.gov/pubs/ifdp/2011/1033/ifdp1033.pdf

 

 

 

 

Comparing Trade Performance of China and India

Sarah Y TONG

http://www.eai.nus.edu.sg/publications/files/Vol1No1_SarahTong.pdf

 

 

 

 

Trade in Value Added : China

OECD WTO

2015

https://www.oecd.org/sti/ind/tiva/CN_2015_China.pdf

 

 

 

Value-Added Trade and Its Implications for International Trade Policy

Kemal Derviş, Joshua P. Meltzer, and Karim Foda

https://www.brookings.edu/opinions/value-added-trade-and-its-implications-for-international-trade-policy/

 

 

 

 

Bilateral Trade Balances with China: A Matter of Accounting

Submitted by Dana Vorisek

co-authors: Tianli Zhao

On Thu, 02/05/2015

http://blogs.worldbank.org/prospects/bilateral-trade-balances-china-matter-accounting

 

 

 

Value-Added Exports and U.S. Local Labor Markets:
Does China Really Matter?

Leilei Sheny
Peri Silvaz

WTO

August 2017

https://www.wto.org/english/res_e/reser_e/gtdw_e/wkshop17_e/silva_e.pdf

 

 

 

HOW MUCH OF CHINESE EXPORTS IS REALLY MADE IN CHINA? ASSESSING
DOMESTIC VALUE-ADDED WHEN PROCESSING TRADE IS PERVASIVE

 

Robert Koopman
Zhi Wang
Shang-Jin Wei

NBER

June 2008

http://www.nber.org/papers/w14109.pdf

 

 

 

 

GIVE CREDIT WHERE CREDIT IS DUE:
TRACING VALUE ADDED IN GLOBAL PRODUCTION CHAINS

Robert Koopman
William Powers
Zhi Wang
Shang-Jin Wei

September 2010

http://www.nber.org/papers/w16426.pdf

 

 

 

SPIDERS AND SNAKES:
OFFSHORING AND AGGLOMERATION IN THE GLOBAL ECONOMY

Richard Baldwin
Anthony Venables

December 2010

http://www.nber.org/papers/w16611.pdf

 

 

 

TRADING TASKS: A SIMPLE THEORY OF OFFSHORING

Gene M. Grossman
Esteban Rossi-Hansberg

December 2006

http://www.nber.org/papers/w12721

 

 

 

 

PRODUCTION CHAINS

David K. Levine

December 2010

http://www.nber.org/papers/w16571.pdf

 

 

 

AN ELEMENTARY THEORY OF GLOBAL SUPPLY CHAINS

Arnaud Costinot
Jonathan Vogel
Su Wang

April 2011

http://www.nber.org/papers/w16936.pdf

 

 

 

TRADE-IN-GOODS AND TRADE-IN-TASKS:
AN INTEGRATING FRAMEWORK

Richard Baldwin
Frédéric Robert-Nicoud

April 2010

http://www.nber.org/papers/w15882.pdf

 

 

Measurement of Trade in Value-Added: using Chinese Input-output Tables
Capturing Processing Trade

Yang Cuihong1, Chen Xikang1, Duan Yuwan1, Jiang Xuemei1, Pei Jiansuo3, Xu Jian2,
Yang Lianling1, Zhu Kunfu1

 

https://www.statistics.gov.hk/wsc/STS024-P3-S.pdf

 

 

 

Adjusted China-US Trade Balance

Lawrence J. Lau, Xikang Chen and Yanyan Xiong

March 2017

http://www.igef.cuhk.edu.hk/igef_media/working-paper/IGEF/igef%20working%20paper%20no.%2054%20english%20version.pdf

 

 

 

Domestic Value Added in Chinese Exports

Hiau Looi Kee and Heiwai Tang

World Bank and Tufts University
December 2011

https://www.imf.org/external/np/seminars/eng/2011/trade/pdf/session2-tang-presentation.pdf

 

 

 

NETWORKS OF VALUE ADDED TRADE

2015
João Amador | Sónia Cabral

Bank of Portugal

https://www.bportugal.pt/sites/default/files/anexos/papers/wp201516.pdf

 

 

 

 

Processing Trade, Exchange Rates and China’s Bilateral Trade Balances

Yuqing Xing

Jan 2011

 

http://www.grips.ac.jp/r-center/wp-content/uploads/10-30.pdf

 

 

 

Trade in Value Added
WTO TiVA Profiles

Regional Workshop on
International Merchandise Trade Statistics
11-13 September 2017
Suzhou, China

UNSD

https://unstats.un.org/unsd/trade/events/2017/suzhou/presentations/Agenda%20item%2019%20(c)%20-%20WTO.pdf

 

 

 

 

FRAGMENTATION AND TRADE IN VALUE ADDED OVER FOUR DECADES

Robert C. Johnson
Guillermo Noguera

June 2012

http://www.nber.org/papers/w18186.pdf

 

 

 

 

TRACING VALUE-ADDED AND DOUBLE COUNTING IN GROSS EXPORTS

Robert Koopman
Zhi Wang
Shang-Jin Wei

November 2012

http://www.nber.org/papers/w18579.pdf

 

 

 

 

ORGANIZING THE GLOBAL VALUE CHAIN

Pol Antràs
Davin Chor

June 2012

 

http://www.nber.org/papers/w18163.pdf

 

 

 

 

OFFSHORING: GENERAL EQUILIBRIUM EFFECTS ON WAGES, PRODUCTION
AND TRADE

Richard Baldwin
Frederic Robert-Nicoud

March 2007

 

http://www.nber.org/papers/w12991.pdf

 

 

 

 

TRADING TASKS: A SIMPLE THEORY OF OFFSHORING

Gene M. Grossman
Esteban Rossi-Hansberg

December 2006

http://www.nber.org/papers/w12721.pdf

 

 

 

 

Trade in Value Added: Developing New Measures of Cross-Border Trade

World Bank

2013

http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/en/196231468326398562/pdf/786210PUB0REPL00Box377348B00PUBLIC0.pdf

 

 

 

 

Trade in Value Added

Maria Borga Jiemin Guo

BEA Advisory Committee

May 10, 2013

 

https://www.bea.gov/about/pdf/0613_borga_guo_trade_in_value.pdf

 

 

 

 

Trade in value added Concepts, applications and challenges

Training Workshop on Trade in Services Negotiations for AU-CFTA Negotiators
Nairobi, Kenya

WTO

http://unctad.org/meetings/en/Presentation/ditc-ted-Nairobi-24082015-WTO-liberatore-2.pdf

 

 

 

Trade in Value-Added: I-O approach and the domestic content of exports

UNSD

 

https://unstats.un.org/unsd/trade/globalforum/trade-value-added.asp

 

 

 

 

TRADE IN VALUE-ADDED: WTO-OECD DATABASE

Courtesy of Sébastien Miroudot (OECD)

UNESCAP

https://artnet.unescap.org/tid/artnet/mtg/cbtr9-sebastien.pdf

 

 

 

 

TRADE IN VALUE-ADDED: CONCEPTS, METHODOLOGIES AND CHALLENGES
(JOINT OECD-WTO NOTE)

OECD WTO

http://www.oecd.org/sti/ind/49894138.pdf

 

 

 

 

Trade in Value Added and the Value Added in Trade

WIOD

Working Paper Number: 8
Author: Robert Stehrer

http://www.wiod.org/publications/papers/wiod8.pdf

 

 

 

Measuring Trade in Value-Added

Draft Chapter 9

Meeting of Group of Experts on National Accounts –
Interim meeting on Global Production
Geneva, 3-4 April 2013

https://www.unece.org/fileadmin/DAM/stats/documents/ece/ces/ge.20/2013/Working_Paper_9.pdf

 

 

 

Trade in Value Added: The Challenge of International Trade Statistics
With an Empirical Study on Trade in Norway and the Netherlands 2000-2012

Ida Helene Berg

https://www.duo.uio.no/bitstream/handle/10852/40975/BergIdaHelene.pdf?sequence=9

 

 

 

Trade in Value-Added and Comparative Advantage

DrRadford Schantz

25thINFORUM Conference
Riga

August 28-September 2, 2017

http://inforumweb.umd.edu/papers/conferences/2017/usa_schantz_2017_slides.pdf

 

 

 

Trade in Value Added: An East Asian Perspective.

Inomata, S.

2013.

ADBI Working Paper 451. Tokyo: Asian Development Bank Institute.

https://www.adb.org/sites/default/files/publication/156306/adbi-wp451.pdf

 

 

 

 

Global Value Chains and Trade in Value-Added: New Insights, Better Policies

Ken Ash

March 2013

 

https://www.worldeconomics.com/papers/Global%20Value%20Chains%20and%20Trade%20in%20ValueAdded_f7fe83a3-ec02-4180-9b02-04d1d85bb59a.paper

 

 

 

OECD WORK ON GLOBAL VALUE CHAINS AND TRADE IN VALUE ADDED

Koen De Backer

2013

http://bruegel.org/wp-content/uploads/imported/events/130627_de_backer.pdf

 

 

 

 

The Value-added Structure of Gross Exports and Global Production Network

Robert Koopman and Zhi Wang
United States International Trade Commission

Shang-Jin Wei, Columbia University, CEPR and NBER

https://www.gtap.agecon.purdue.edu/resources/download/5839.pdf

 

 

 

Singapore’s Trade in Value Added:
Importance and Implication of Information from the OCED-WTO TiVA Database

Mun–Heng TOH

 

https://www.iioa.org/conferences/24th/papers/files/2582_20160412091_Singapore_TiVA.pdf

 

 

 

 

Value added and participation in Global Value Chains:
the case of Spain

Marta Solaz
Universitat de Valencia

Fourth World KLEMS Conference, 23-24 May 2016

http://www.worldklems.net/conferences/worldklems2016/worldklems2016_Solaz_slides.pdf

 

 

 

 

Trade in Value Added (TiVA): December 2016

OECD

https://stats.oecd.org/index.aspx?queryid=75537

 

 

 

 

An Overview on the Construction of North American Regional Supply-Use and Input-Output Tables and their Applications in Policy Analysis

Statistics Canada
Anthony Peluso
U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis
Gabriel Medeiros
Jeffrey Young
U.S. International Trade Commission
Ross J. Hallren
Lin Jones
Richard Nugent
Heather Wickramarachi

ECONOMICS WORKING PAPER SERIES
Working Paper 2017-12-A

https://www.usitc.gov/publications/332/working_papers/ecwp-2017-12-a-12-12-17-as-pdf_0.pdf

 

 

 

 

C. The rise of global value chains

World Trade Report

2014

https://www.wto.org/english/res_e/booksp_e/wtr14-2c_e.pdf

 

 

 

 

MEASURING VALUE IN GLOBAL VALUE CHAINS

Rashmi Banga

UNCTAD
May 2013

http://unctad.org/en/PublicationsLibrary/ecidc2013misc1_bp8.pdf

 

 

 

 

Highlights and Challenges of Measuring Global Production

Tom Howells
Federal Economic Statistics Advisory Committee
Suitland Federal Center

June 9, 2017

https://www2.census.gov/adrm/fesac/2017-06-09/Howells-Presentation.pdf

 

 

 

 

Value added trade: A tale of two concepts

Robert Stehrer

The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies (wiiw)
Version: 2012-12-09

December 10-11, 2012 – CompNet workshop
ECB Frankfurt, Germany.

 

http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.361.9428&rep=rep1&type=pdf

 

 

 

Summary Report of the Fifth Meeting of
APEC Technical Group of Measurement on TiVA under GVCs

August 2017

http://gvc.mofcom.gov.cn/Tjbh/inforimages/201709/20170901142536597.pdf

 

 

 

 

Trade in value added: do we need new measures of competitiveness?

Kirsten Lommatzsch, Maria Silgoner and Paul Ramskogler

2016

https://www.ecb.europa.eu/pub/pdf/scpwps/ecbwp1936.en.pdf?54d5d8210e9e26ed5bf65d4279223622

 

 

 

 

Who Faces the Risk of Collateral Damage from U.S. Tariffs?

wells Fargo

March 2018

https://www.wellsfargo.com/assets/pdf/commercial/insights/economics/special-reports/collateral-damage-20180326.pdf

 

 

 

 

Supply-Use Tables, Trade-in-Value-Added Initiatives, and their Applications

William Powers

ADB Supply and Use Tables Validation Workshop

Bangkok, Thailand
30 June, 2016

https://wpqr4.adb.org/dm/atom/library/_Psut_RMain/document/_Psut_RPageLibrary48257E1F0010578E_D0819CE5DCD76117148257FE2002C81CC_ATiVA_5f2016_5fPowers.pdf/media

 

 

 

 

CHAPTER 13. APPLICATIONS OF EXTENDED SUPPLY AND USE TABLES:
CONSTRUCTING GLOBAL SUPPLY AND USE AND INPUT-OUTPUT TABLES

UNSD

 

https://unstats.un.org/unsd/trade/events/2016/nov-newyork/presentations/thu/Chapter%2013%20-%20Applications%20for%20Global%20Tables.pdf

 

 

 

 

APEC: Trade in Value Added under Global Value Chains

Erich H. Strassner

2ndStatistics Conference “Measuring the Economy in a Globalized World”
Santiago, Chile
3-4 October 2017

http://www.bcentral.cl/documents/20143/926189/4.2.%28Strassner%29.pdf/d18bab8d-2331-3af2-fcc5-e877c1722880

 

 

 

CURRENT DEVELOPMENTS AND FUTURE EXPANSIONS OF
TRADE IN VALUE-ADDED PROJECT IN OECD

Norihiko YAMANO

2016

http://indicadoreseconomicos.bccr.fi.cr/indicadoreseconomicos/Documentos/Foro_MIP/current_developments_trade_valueadded_yamano.pdf

 

 

 

 

Estimating Extended Supply-Use Tables in Basic Prices with Firm Heterogeneity for the United States:A Proof of Concept

Lin Z. Jones and ZhiWang (USITC)
James J. Fetzer, Thomas F. Howells III, Erich H. Strassner (BEA)

The Fourth World KLEMS Conference
Madrid, Spain
May 23-24, 2016

http://www.worldklems.net/conferences/worldklems2016/worldklems2016_Strassner_slides.pdf

 

 

 

 

 

Work Plan for the Technical Group for the Measurement of APEC TiVA Under GVCs
Purpose: Information

Submitted by: China, United States
First Committee on Trade and Investment Meeting
Clark, Philippines
3-4 February 2015

http://www.foodfti.com/Files/Name/CONTENT50694276526.pdf

 

 

 

 

APEC in 2014

https://www.eastwestcenter.org/sites/default/files/filemanager/pubs/pdfs/NewDirections/NewDirections-05apec.pdf

 

 

 

Global value chains and trade in value added

EUROSTAT

http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/statistics-explained/index.php/Global_value_chains_and_trade_in_value_added

 

 

 

Services and Manufacturing : Patterns of Linkages

Expert Group Meeting on “Global Value Chains, Regional Integration and Sustainable Development: Asia-Pacific Perspectives”

12 Dec 2014 – UNESCAP, Bangkok

http://www.unescap.org/sites/default/files/EGM-Session%203-Andre%20Wirjo.pdf

 

 

 

The 3rd Capacity Building Workshop on Strategic Framework on Measurement of APEC TiVA under GVCs and its Action Plan

APEC

2017

https://aimp2.apec.org/sites/PDB/Lists/Proposals/DispForm.aspx?ID=2012

 

 

 

 

Capacity Building Workshop on Strategic Framework on Measurement of APEC TiVA under GVCs and its Action Plan

APEC

2016

https://aimp2.apec.org/sites/PDB/Lists/Proposals/DispForm.aspx?ID=1831

 

 

 

 

Enhancing Value Chains An Agenda for APEC

CSIS

2013

http://www.ncapec.org/publications/docs/EnhancingValueChains%20Report.pdf

 

 

 

Changing Patterns of Trade and Global Value Chains in Postcrisis Asia

Ganeshan Wignaraja

Juzhong Zhuang

Mahinthan J. Mariasingham

Madeline Dumaua-Cabauatan

2017

https://www.adb.org/sites/default/files/publication/225091/changing-patterns-trade-gvc.pdf

 

 

 

Global value chains in a changing world

Edited by Deborah K. Elms and Patrick Low

WTO

https://www.wto.org/english/res_e/booksp_e/aid4tradeglobalvalue13_e.pdf

 

 

 

 

Trade in value added: Concepts, estimation and analysis,

Javorsek, Marko; Camacho, Ignacio

(2015) :

ARTNeT Working Paper Series, No. 150

https://www.econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/145386/1/826594735.pdf

 

 

 

India’s Future in Asia: The APEC Opportunity

By Harsha V. Singh and Anubhav Gupta

 

https://asiasociety.org/files/ASPI_APEC_fullreport_online.pdf

 

 

 

Update on New Measurements of the Impacts of Globalization

James J. Fetzer and Thomas F. Howells III

Advisory Committee Meeting
Washington, DC
November 13, 2015

 

https://bea.gov/about/pdf/acm/2015/november/update-on-new-measurements-of-the-impacts-of-globalization.pdf

 

 

 

 

ASIA-PACIFIC
TRADE AND INVESTMENT REPORT 2016
Recent Trends and Developments

Shamshad Akhtar

Hongjoo Hahm

Susan F. Stone

Copyright © United Nations 2016

http://www.unescap.org/sites/default/files/publications/aptir-2016-full.pdf

 

 

 

 

Asia’s Rise in the
New World Trade Order
The Effects of Mega-Regional Trade Agreements on Asian Countries
Part 2 of the GED Study Series:
Effects of Mega-Regional Trade Agreements

 

https://www.bertelsmann-stiftung.de/fileadmin/files/BSt/Publikationen/GrauePublikationen/NW_Asia_s_Rise_in_the_New_World_Trade_Order.pdf

 

 

 

The role of different types of firms in GVCs

GGDC 25th Anniversary Conference

 

Stephen Chong, Rutger Hoekstra, Oscar Lemmers, Ilke Van Beveren, Marcel van den Berg, Ron van der Wal, Piet Verbiest

https://www.rug.nl/ggdc/events/conference2017/presentations/presentation_lemmers.pdf

 

 

 

GLOBAL VALUE CHAINS AND SOUTH-SOUTH TRADE

UNCTAD

http://unctad.org/en/PublicationsLibrary/gdsecidc2015d1_en.pdf

 

 

 

 

Annex 5: Strategic Framework on Measurement of
APEC TiVA Under GVCs

APEC

http://mddb.apec.org/Documents/2014/SOM/SOM2/14_som2_049anx05.pdf

 

 

 

 

Estimating Extended Supply-Use Tables in Basic Prices with Firm Heterogeneity for the United States: A Proof of Concept

James J. Fetzer, Thomas F. Howells III, Lin Z. Jones, Erich H. Strassner, and Zhi Wang1

The Fourth World KLEMS Conference
Madrid, Spain
May 23-24, 2016

http://www.worldklems.net/conferences/worldklems2016/worldklems2016_Strassner.pdf

 

 

 

 “Participation of Developing Countries in Global Value Chains: Implications for Trade and Trade-Related Policies”

Kowalski, P. et al.

(2015),

OECD Trade Policy Papers, No. 179,
OECD Publishing, Paris

https://www.die-gdi.de/uploads/media/OECD_Trade_Policy_Papers_179.pdf

 

 

 

 

Complex Network Analysis for Characterizing Global Value Chains in Equipment Manufacturing.

Xiao H, Sun T, Meng B, Cheng L

(2017)

PLoS ONE 12(1):

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5231281/pdf/pone.0169549.pdf

 

 

 

A Network of Networks Perspective on Global Trade.

Maluck J, Donner RV

(2015)

PLoS ONE 10(7)

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4510408/pdf/pone.0133310.pdf

 

 

 

Trends of the World Input and Output Network of Global Trade.

del RõÂo-Chanona RM, Grujić J, Jeldtoft Jensen H

(2017)

PLoS ONE 12(1):

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5270329/pdf/pone.0170817.pdf

 

 

 

World Input-Output Network.

Cerina F, Zhu Z, Chessa A, Riccaboni M

(2015)

PLoS ONE 10(7):

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4519177/pdf/pone.0134025.pdf

 

 

 

FAQ on GVCs: some answers from the Global I-O tables approach

Rita Cappariello,

 

https://www.centrorossidoria.it/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/Rita-Cappariello.pdf

 

 

 

 

 

A Markovian model of evolving world input-output network.

Moosavi V, Isacchini G

(2017)

PLoS ONE 12(10):

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5655482/pdf/pone.0186746.pdf

 

 

 

 

Hierarchicality of Trade Flow Networks Reveals Complexity of Products.

Shi P, Zhang J, Yang B, Luo J

(2014)

PLoS ONE 9(6):

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4048167/pdf/pone.0098247.pdf

 

 

 

International Trade Modelling Using Open Flow Networks: A Flow-Distance Based Analysis.

Shen B, Zhang J, Li Y, Zheng Q, Li X
(2015)

PLoS ONE 10(11):

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4646344/pdf/pone.0142936.pdf

 

 

 

THE EVOLVING GEOGRAPHY OF PRODUCTION HUBS AND REGIONAL VALUE CHAINS ACROSS EAST ASIA: TRADE IN VALUE-ADDED

G. Suder (Melbourne Business School), P. Liesch (UQ), S. Inomata (JETRO- IDE), I. Jormanainen (Aalto University) and B. Meng (JETRO- IDE and OECD),

For: Journal of World Business

 

https://minerva-access.unimelb.edu.au/bitstream/handle/11343/159095/The%20evolving%20geography%20of%20production%20hubs%20and%20regional%20value%20chains%20across%20East%20Asia-%20Trade%20in%20value-added.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y

 

 

 

 

AN ICIO SPLIT ACCORDING TO DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN OWNERSHIP:
THE OECD TIVA-MNE PROJECT

Charles Cadestin, Koen De Backer, Isabelle Desnoyers-James,
Sébastien Miroudot, Davide Rigo and Ming Ye

OECD

2017

https://www.iioa.org/conferences/25th/papers/files/2757_20170515071_Cadestin_et_al_2017_ICIO_split_ownership.pdf

 

 

 

 

THE FIGARO PROJECT: THE EU INTER-COUNTRY SUPPLY, USE AND INPUT-OUTPUT TABLES

 

https://www.iioa.org/conferences/24th/papers/files/2504_20160519071_Item10-12_FIGAROproject.pdf

 

 

Identifying Heterogeneity in the Production Components of Globally Engaged Business Enterprises in the United States

James Fetzer and Erich H. Strassner

June 10, 2015

US BEA

 

https://www.bea.gov/papers/pdf/identifying-heterogeneity-in-the-production-components-of-globally-engaged-business-enterprises-in-the-united-states.pdf

 

 

The EU Inter-country Supply, Use and Input-Output Tables (FIGARO Project): Recent progress

Prepared by Eurostat

2017

https://www.unece.org/fileadmin/DAM/stats/documents/ece/ces/ge.20/2017/3_-_FIGARO_project.pdf

 

 

Tracing value-added and double counting in sales of foreign affiliates and domestic-owned companies

Sebastien Miroudot and ming ye

Trade and Agriculture Directorate, OECD, Trade and Agriculture Directorate, OECD

14 March 2018

https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/85723/1/MPRA_paper_85723.pdf

 

Identifying Heterogeneity in the Production Components of Globally Engaged Business Enterprises in the United States

Prepared by Bureau of Economic Analysis, U.S. Department of Commerce

2015

 

https://www.unece.org/fileadmin/DAM/stats/documents/ece/ces/ge.20/2015/July/11_Identifying_Heterogeneity__US_.pdf

 

 

 

 

Estimating Extended Supply-Use Tables in Basic Prices with Firm Heterogeneity for the United States: A Proof of Concept (Draft)

Prepared by the United States

2017

 

https://www.unece.org/fileadmin/DAM/stats/documents/ece/ces/ge.20/2017/7_-_Estimating_Extended_Supply-Use_Tables_in_Basic_Prices.pdf

 

 

TIVA: CONSTRUCTING THE ICIO TABLE AND FUTURE WORK

 

Fabienne Fortanier (Head of Trade Statistics, OECD) Christophe Degain (Senior Statistician, WTO)

OECD

https://ecastats.uneca.org/acsweb/Portals/0/Etraining_SUT/Session%2012_WTO-OECD%20SUT%20and%20ICIOT%20-%20Training%20module%20(ECA)%20-%20English%20Final.pdf

 

 

 

 

FIGARO
Full International and Global Accounts for Research in Input-
Output analysis
The EU Inter-country Supply, Use and Input-Output Tables

José M. Rueda-Cantuche

Isabelle Rémond-Tiedrez

Item 4, NAWG Meeting, Luxembourg, 11 May 2016

https://www.unece.org/fileadmin/DAM/stats/documents/ece/ces/ge.20/2016/Item_4d_FIGARO_UNECE_new.pdf

 

 

 

OECD-WTO Trade in Value Added (TiVA) data: introduction

OECD

 

https://ecastats.uneca.org/acsweb/Portals/0/Etraining_SUT/Session%2011_WTO-OECD%20TiVA%20intro%20-%20Training%20module%20(ECA)%20-%20English%20FINAL.pdf

 

 

 

Trade and Investment Linkages in Global Value Chains: Insights from the new TiVA-MNE Dataset

OECD

2016

 

https://www.oecd.org/tad/policynotes/trade-investment-linkages-in-gvc.pdf

 

 

INTERCONNECTED ECONOMIES:
BENEFITING FROM INDUSTRY GLOBALISATION

Dirk Pilat,

Global Industry and Economy Forum 2013:
Fostering Industrial Innovation through
Creativity
Seoul, 24 June 2013

 

 

Calculating Trade in Value Added

Prepared by Aqib Aslam, Natalija Novta, and Fabiano Rodrigues-Bastos1

July 2017

IMF

https://www.imf.org/~/media/Files/Publications/WP/2017/wp17178.ashx

 

Measuring Globalization: Global Multi Region Input Output Data Bases (G-MRIO)

Measuring Globalization: Global Multi Region Input Output Data Bases (G-MRIO)

 

A special issue of Economic Systems Research published in 2013 discussed currently available GMRIO data bases.  There are two strands of research in development and use of these databases:

  • Trade flows and global supply chains
  • Environmental Impacts of Economic Growth, Trade and Globalization

 

G-MRIO

  • IDE JETRO Asian IO Tables
  • EORA
  • OECD Inter-Country Input-Output (ICIO) tables
  • GRAM (Global Resource Accounting Model )
  • World Input-Output Database (WIOD).
  • Global Trade Analysis Project (GTAP)
  • EXIOPOL (EXIOBASE)

 

Another recent development is development of Trade in Value added databases analyzing trade flows of intermediate goods and fragmented global supply chains and production networks.  These projects are currently underway at the time of writing of this post.

TIVA Databases

  • NA TiVA Project
  • The OECD-WTO TiVA database
  • APEC TiVA initiative

 

There are also EE- GMRIO (Environmentally extended GMRIO) discussed else where in a related post.

 

GMRIO Databases

 

GRAM

The Global Resource Accounting Model (GRAM) is a multi-regional input-output model (MRIO), which currently distinguishes between 62 countries and one ‘rest of the world’ region and 48 industrial sectors per country or region. The heart of the model is made up of OECD data on bilateral trade flows and input-output tables for 1995 to 2010. Combined with additional data sets, such as CO2 emissions and material extraction, the model enables production-related variables to be attributed to end consumption.

 

 

GLOBAL MULTIREGIONAL INPUT–OUTPUT FRAMEWORKS: AN INTRODUCTION AND OUTLOOK

Arnold Tukker & Erik Dietzenbacher
Published online: 21 Mar 2013
This review is the introduction to a special issue of Economic Systems Research on the topic of global multi regional input–output (GMRIO) tables, models, and analysis. It provides a short historical context of GMRIO development and its applications (many of which deal with environmental extensions) and presents the rationale for the major database projects presented in this special issue. Then the six papers are briefly introduced. This is followed by a concluding comparison of the characteristics of the main GMRIO databases developed thus far and an outlook of potential further developments.

 

COMPILATION AND APPLICATIONS OF IDE-JETRO’S INTERNATIONAL INPUT–OUTPUT TABLES

Bo Meng , Yaxiong Zhang & Satoshi Inomata
Published online: 21 Mar 2013
International input–output (IO) tables are among the most useful tools for economic analysis. Since these tables provide detailed information about international production networks, they have recently attracted considerable attention in research on spatial economics, global value chains, and issues relating to trade in value added. The Institute of Developing Economies at the Japan External Trade Organization (IDE-JETRO) has more than 40 years of experience in the construction and analysis of international IO tables. This paper explains the development of IDE-JETRO’s multi-regional IO projects including the construction of the Asian International Input–Output table and the Transnational Inter regional Input–Output table between China and Japan. To help users understand the features of the tables, this paper also gives examples of their application.

 

 

EXIOPOL – DEVELOPMENT AND ILLUSTRATIVE ANALYSES OF A DETAILED GLOBAL MR EE SUT/IOT

Arnold Tukker , Arjan de Koning , Richard Wood , Troy Hawkins , Stephan Lutter , Jose
Published online: 21 Mar 2013
EXIOPOL (A New Environmental Accounting Framework Using Externality Data and Input–Output Tools for Policy Analysis) was a European Union (EU)-funded project creating a detailed, global, multi regional environmentally extended Supply and Use table (MR EE SUT) of 43 countries, 129 sectors, 80 resources, and 40 emissions. We sourced primary SUT and input–output tables from Eurostat and non-EU statistical offices. We harmonized and detailed them using auxiliary national accounts data and co-efficient matrices. Imports were allocated to countries of exports using United Nations Commodity Trade Statistics Database trade shares. Optimization procedures removed imbalances in these detailing and trade linking steps. Environmental extensions were added from various sources. We calculated the EU footprint of final consumption with resulting MR EE SUT. EU policies focus mainly on energy and carbon footprints. We show that the EU land, water, and material footprint abroad is much more relevant, and should be prioritized in the EU’s environmental product and trade policies.

 

 

A MULTI-REGION INPUT–OUTPUT TABLE BASED ON THE GLOBAL TRADE ANALYSIS PROJECT DATABASE (GTAP-MRIO)

Robbie M. Andrew & Glen P. Peters
Published online: 21 Mar 2013
Understanding the drivers of many environmental problems requires enumerating the global supply chain. Multi-region input–output analysis (MRIOA) is a well-established technique for this purpose, but constructing a multi-region input–output table (MRIOT) can be a formidable challenge. We constructed a large MRIOT using the Global Trade Analysis Project (GTAP) database of harmonised economic, IO, and trade data. We discuss the historical development of the GTAP-MRIO and describe its efficient construction. We provide updated carbon footprint estimates and analyse several issues relevant for MRIO construction and applications. We demonstrate that differences in environmental satellite accounts may be more important than differences in MRIOTs when calculating national carbon footprints. The GTAP-MRIO is a robust global MRIOT and, given its easy availability and implementation, it should allow the widespread application of global MRIOA by a variety of users.

 

 

THE CONSTRUCTION OF WORLD INPUT–OUTPUT TABLES IN THE WIOD PROJECT

Erik Dietzenbacher , Bart Los , Robert Stehrer , Marcel Timmer & Gaaitzen de Vries
Published online: 21 Mar 2013
This article describes the construction of the World Input–Output Tables (WIOTs) that constitute the core of the World Input–Output Database. WIOTs are available for the period 1995–2009 and give the values of transactions among 35 industries in 40 countries plus the ‘Rest of the World’ and from these industries to households, governments and users of capital goods in the same set of countries. The article describes how information from the National Accounts, Supply and Use Tables and International Trade Statistics have been harmonized, reconciled and used for estimation procedures to arrive at a consistent time series of WIOTs.

 

 

BUILDING EORA: A GLOBAL MULTI-REGION INPUT–OUTPUT DATABASE AT HIGH COUNTRY AND SECTOR RESOLUTION

Manfred Lenzen , Daniel Moran , Keiichiro Kanemoto & Arne Geschke
Published online: 21 Mar 2013
There are a number of initiatives aimed at compiling large-scale global multi-region input–output (MRIO) tables complemented with non-monetary information such as on resource flows and environmental burdens. Depending on purpose or application, MRIO construction and usage has been hampered by a lack of geographical and sectoral detail; at the time of writing, the most advanced initiatives opt for a breakdown into at most 129 regions and 120 sectors. Not all existing global MRIO frameworks feature continuous time series, margins and tax sheets, and information on reliability and uncertainty. Despite these potential limitations, constructing a large MRIO requires significant manual labour and many years of time. This paper describes the results from a project aimed at creating an MRIO account that represents all countries at a detailed sectoral level, allows continuous updating, provides information on data reliability, contains table sheets expressed in basic prices as well as all margins and taxes, and contains a historical time series. We achieve these goals through a high level of procedural standardisation, automation, and data organisation.

 

 

POLICY-RELEVANT APPLICATIONS OF ENVIRONMENTALLY EXTENDED MRIO DATABASES – EXPERIENCES FROM THE UK

Thomas Wiedmann & John Barrett
Published online: 21 Mar 2013
The impressive development in global multi-region input–output (IO) databases is accompanied by an increase in applications published in the scientific literature. However, it is not obvious whether the insights gained from these studies have indeed been used in political decision-making. We ask whether and to what extent there is policy uptake of results from environmentally extended multi-region IO (EE-MRIO) models and how it may be improved. We identify unique characteristics of such models not inherent to other approaches. We then present evidence from the UK showing that a policy process around consumption-based accounting for greenhouse gas emissions and resource use has evolved that is based on results from EE-MRIO modelling. This suggests that specific, policy-relevant information that would be impossible to obtain otherwise can be generated with the help of EE-MRIO models. Our analysis is limited to environmental applications of global MRIO models and to government policies in the UK.

 

From GLOBAL MULTIREGIONAL INPUT–OUTPUT FRAMEWORKS: AN INTRODUCTION AND OUTLOOK

GMRIO

 

From POLICY-RELEVANT APPLICATIONS OF ENVIRONMENTALLY EXTENDED MRIO  DATABASES – EXPERIENCES FROM THE UK

GMRIO2

From Economic Systems Research

Volume 26, 2014 – Issue 3: A Comparative Evaluation of Multi-Regional Input-Output Databases

CONVERGENCE BETWEEN THE EORA, WIOD, EXIOBASE, AND OPENEU’S CONSUMPTION-BASED CARBON ACCOUNTS

Daniel Moran & Richard Wood
Published online: 14 Jul 2014

In this paper, we take an overview of several of the biggest independently constructed global multi-regional input–output (MRIO) databases and ask how reliable and consonant these databases are. The key question is whether MRIO accounts are robust enough for setting environmental policies. This paper compares the results of four global MRIOs: Eora, WIOD, EXIOBASE, and the GTAP-based OpenEU databases, and investigates how much each diverges from the multi-model mean. We also use Monte Carlo analysis to conduct sensitivity analysis of the robustness of each accounts’ results and we test to see how much variation in the environmental satellite account, rather than the economic structure itself, causes divergence in results. After harmonising the satellite account, we found that carbon footprint results for most major economies disagree by<10% between MRIOs. Confidence estimates are necessary if MRIO methods and consumption-based accounting are to be used in environmental policy-making at the national level.

COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF MRIO DATABASES

Satoshi Inomata & Anne Owen

Published online: 11 Aug 2014

This editorial is the introduction to a special issue of Economics Systems Research on the topic of intercomparison of multi-regional input–output (MRIO) databases and analyses. It explains the rationale for dedicating an issue of this journal to this area of research. Then the six papers chosen for this issue are introduced. This is followed by a concluding section outlining future directions for developers and users of MRIO databases.

 

Please see my related posts:

Accounting For Global Carbon Emission Chains

Development of Global Trade and Production Accounts: UN SEIGA Initiative

Stock Flow Consistent Models for Ecological Economics

 

 

Key Sources of Research:

 

The World Input‐Output Database (WIOD): Contents, Sources and Methods

Edited by Marcel Timmer (University of Groningen)

With contributions from:
Abdul A. Erumban, Reitze Gouma, Bart Los, Umed Temurshoev and
Gaaitzen J. de Vries (University of Groningen)
Iñaki Arto, Valeria Andreoni Aurélien Genty, Frederik Neuwahl, José
M. Rueda‐Cantuche and Alejandro Villanueva (IPTS)
Joe Francois, Olga Pindyuk, Johannes Pöschl and Robert Stehrer
(WIIW), Gerhard Streicher (WIFO)

April 2012, Version 0.9

http://www.wiod.org/publications/source_docs/WIOD_sources.pdf

 

 

 

Analyzing Global Value Chains using the World Input-Output
Database

Bart Los (University of Groningen)
with Marcel Timmer (Groningen), Gaaitzen de Vries
(Groningen) and Robert Stehrer (wiiw Vienna)

BBVA Foundation – Ivie Workshop, October 30, 2017, Valencia

http://www.ivie.es/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/B.-Los.pdf

 

An Overview on the Construction of North American Regional Supply-Use and Input-Output Tables and their Applications in Policy Analysis

Statistics Canada
Anthony Peluso
U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis
Gabriel Medeiros
Jeffrey Young
U.S. International Trade Commission
Ross J. Hallren
Lin Jones
Richard Nugent
Heather Wickramarachi

ECONOMICS WORKING PAPER SERIES
Working Paper 2017-12-A

https://www.usitc.gov/publications/332/working_papers/na-tiva_white_paper_for_posting_revised_02-20.pdf

 

 

 

 

The Global MRIO Lab – charting the world economy,

Manfred Lenzen, Arne Geschke, Muhammad Daaniyall Abd Rahman, Yanyan
Xiao, Jacob Fry, Rachel Reyes, Erik Dietzenbacher, Satoshi Inomata, Keiichiro Kanemoto, Bart Los, Daniel Moran, Hagen Schulte in den Bäumen, Arnold Tukker, Terrie Walmsley, Thomas Wiedmann, Richard Wood & Norihiko Yamano

(2017)

Economic Systems Research, 29:2, 158-186

http://folk.ntnu.no/richardw/papers/Lenzen%20et%20al._2017_Economic%20Systems%20Research_The%20Global%20MRIO%20Lab–charting%20the%20world%20economy.pdf

 

 

 

 

INPUT–OUTPUT ANALYSIS: THE NEXT 25 YEARS,

Erik Dietzenbacher, Manfred Lenzen, Bart Los, Dabo Guan, Michael L. Lahr,
Ferran Sancho, Sangwon Suh & Cuihong Yang

(2013)

Economic Systems Research, 25:4, 369-389

http://eprints.whiterose.ac.uk/80151/1/Guan-ESR-2013-IO%20next%2025%20years.pdf

 

 

 

OECD Inter-Country Input-Output (ICIO) Tables, 2016 edition

http://www.oecd.org/sti/ind/inter-country-input-output-tables.htm

 

 

Trade in Value Added

OECD

http://www.oecd.org/sti/ind/measuringtradeinvalue-addedanoecd-wtojointinitiative.htm

 

 

 

The Global Resource Accounting Model (GRAM)
a methodological concept paper

Stefan Giljum a, Christian Lutz b, Ariane Jungnitz b

a Sustainable Europe Research Institute (SERI), Vienna, Austria
b Institute for Economic Structures Research (GWS), Osnabrück, Germany

April 2008
http://petre.org.uk/pdf/Giljum_et_al_GRAM_concept_paper_final.pdf

 

 

 

POLICY-RELEVANT APPLICATIONS OF
ENVIRONMENTALLY EXTENDED MRIO DATABASES – EXPERIENCES FROM THE UK,

Thomas Wiedmann & John Barrett

(2013):

Economic Systems Research, 25:1, 143-156

http://www.see.leeds.ac.uk/fileadmin/Documents/teaching-resources/Wiedmann__Barrett_-_2013_-_Policy-relevant_applications_of_evironmentally_extended_MRIO_databases_-_experiences_from_the_UK.pdf

 

 

THE CONSTRUCTION OF WORLD INPUT–OUTPUT TABLES IN THE WIOD PROJECT,

Erik Dietzenbacher , Bart Los , Robert Stehrer , Marcel Timmer & Gaaitzen de
Vries

(2013)

Economic Systems Research, 25:1, 71-98,

https://unstats.un.org/unsd/trade/events/2014/mexico/documents/session6/WIOD%20construction.pdf

 

 

System of Environmental-Economic Accounting 2012— Applications and Extensions

http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/documents/3859598/7789413/KS-01-15-797-EN-N.pdf/9404d9b0-5c2d-48c8-b1e9-2632800162e7

 

 

Calculating Trade in Value Added

IMF

Prepared by Aqib Aslam, Natalija Novta, and Fabiano Rodrigues-Bastos1

July 2017

https://www.imf.org/~/media/Files/Publications/WP/2017/wp17178.ashx

 

 

World Input-Output Network

Federica Cerina, Zhen Zhu, Alessandro Chessa and Massimo Riccaboni

July 1, 2015

http://www.etsg.org/ETSG2015/Papers/336.pdf

 

 

 

Making Global Value Chain Research More Accessible

Lin Jones, William Powers, and Ravinder Ubee1

U.S. International Trade Commission, Office of Economics

October 21, 2013

https://www.usitc.gov/publications/332/ec201310a.pdf

 

On the Measurement of Upstreamness and Downstreamness in
Global Value Chains

Pol Antras
Harvard University and NBER
Davin Chor
National University of Singapore

October 30, 2017

https://scholar.harvard.edu/files/antras/files/upstream_ac_oct30_2017_withtables.pdf

 

 

 

THE OECD INPUT-OUTPUT DATABASE: 2006 EDITION

STI WORKING PAPER 2006/8

Norihiko Yamano and Nadim Ahmad

https://www.dartmouth.edu/~rstaiger/OECD%20Input-Output%20Database.pdf

 

 

 

GLOBAL MULTI REGIONAL INPUT–OUTPUT FRAMEWORKS: AN INTRODUCTION AND OUTLOOK,

Arnold Tukker & Erik Dietzenbacher

(2013)

Econ omic Systems Research, 25:1,1-19

https://unstats.un.org/unsd/trade/events/2014/mexico/documents/session6/UNSD%20-%20Tukker%20-%20Overview%20on%20International%20IO%20Tables%20-%202013.pdf

 

THE CONSTRUCTION OF WORLD INPUT–OUTPUT TABLES IN THE WIOD PROJECT,

Erik Dietzenbacher , Bart Los , Robert Stehrer , Marcel Timmer & Gaaitzen de
Vries

(2013)

Economic Systems Research, 25:1, 71-98

https://unstats.un.org/unsd/trade/events/2014/mexico/documents/session6/WIOD%20construction.pdf

 

 

 

A review of recent multi-region input–output models used for consumption-based
emission and resource accounting

Thomas Wiedmann

2009

http://wedocs.unep.org/bitstream/handle/20.500.11822/19433/a_review.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y

 

 

World Input-Output Network

Federica Cerina, Zhen Zhu, Alessandro Chessa, Massimo Riccaboni

2015

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4519177/pdf/pone.0134025.pdf

 

 

A Network of Networks Perspective on Global Trade

Julian Maluck, Reik V. Donner

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4510408/pdf/pone.0133310.pdf

 

 

 

THE ‘REST OF THE WORLD’ – ESTIMATING THE ECONOMIC STRUCTURE OF MISSING REGIONS IN GLOBAL MULTI-REGIONAL INPUT–OUTPUT TABLES,

Konstantin Stadler, Kjartan Steen-Olsen & Richard Wood

(2014)

Economic Systems Research, 26:3, 303-326

http://folk.ntnu.no/richardw/papers/Stadler,%20Steen-olsen,%20Wood_2015_Unknown_the%20‘%20Rest%20of%20the%20World%20’%20–%20Estimating%20the%20Economic%20Structure%20of%20Missing%20Regions%20in%20Global%20Multi.pdf

 

 

“Trade, Environment, and Growth: Advanced topics in Input-Output Analysis”*

Professor: Erik Dietzenbacher (U. Groningen)

March 9-13, 2015

https://www.bc3research.org/images/stories/events/Trainingoneconomics_2015/outline___trade_growth_and_the_environment_.pdf

 

 

 

 

Wassily Leontief and the discovery of the input-output approach

http://www.sv.uio.no/econ/english/research/unpublished-works/working-papers/pdf-files/2016/memo-18-2016-versjon-2.pdf

 

 

Networks of value added trade,

Amador, João; Cabral, Sónia

(2016)

ECB Working Paper, No. 1931, ISBN 978-92-899-2179-4,

https://www.econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/154364/1/ecbwp1931.pdf

 

EXIOPOL – DEVELOPMENT AND ILLUSTRATIVE ANALYSES OF A DETAILED GLOBAL MR EE SUT/IOT,

Arnold Tukker , Arjan de Koning , Richard Wood , Troy Hawkins , Stephan
Lutter , Jose Acosta , Jose M. Rueda Cantuche , Maaike Bouwmeester , Jan Oosterhaven ,
Thomas Drosdowski & Jeroen Kuenen

(2013)

Economic Systems Research, 25:1,50-70

http://folk.ntnu.no/richardw/papers/Tukker%20et%20al._2013_Economic%20Systems%20Research_Exiopol%20–%20Development%20and%20Illustrative%20Analyses%20of%20a%20Detailed%20Global%20Mr%20Ee%20SutIot.pdf

 

 

 

The World Input-Output Database (WIOD) project

Robert Stehrer

OECD-WPTSG meeting

November 18, 2009 – OECD, Paris

http://www.oecd.org/sdd/its/44197850.pdf

 

 

The World Input-Output Database (WIOD): Construction, Challenges and Applications

Abdul Azeez Erumbana, Reitze Goumaa, Bart Losa,b, Robert Stehrerc, Umed
Temurshoevb, Marcel Timmer a,b,*, Gaaitzen de Vries

Paper prepared for World Bank workshop
“The Fragmentation of Global Production and Trade in Value Added”,
June 9-10, 2011.

https://siteresources.worldbank.org/INTRANETTRADE/Resources/Internal-Training/287823-1256848879189/6526508-1283456658475/7370147-1308070299728/7997263-1308070314933/PAPER_13_Erumban_Gouma_Los_Stehrer_Temurshoev_Timmer_deVries.pdf

 

The World Input-Output Database: Content, Concepts and Applications.

Timmer, M. P., Dietzenbacher, E., Los, B., Stehrer, R., & de Vries, G. J.

(2014).

GGDC Working Papers; Vol. GD-144).

https://www.rug.nl/research/portal/files/15514485/gd144.pdf

 

 

Measuring Global Value Chains with the WIOD (World Input-Output Database)

Marcel Timmer

Groningen Growth and Development Centre
University of Groningen
(presentation at OECD conference,
Paris, 21 September, 2010)

https://www.rieti.go.jp/jp/events/10102201/pdf/1-3_Timmer.pdf

 

 

 

Global value chains, trade, jobs, and environment: The new WIOD database

Hubert Escaith, Marcel Timmer

13 May 2012

https://voxeu.org/article/new-world-input-output-database

 

Wassily Leontief and the discovery of the input-output approach

Olav Bjerkholt

2016

https://www.econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/165961/1/877412162.pdf

 

 

 

WHO PRODUCES FOR WHOM IN THE WORLD ECONOMY?

Guillaume Daudin (Lille-I (EQUIPPE) & Sciences Po (OFCE), Christine Rifflart, Danielle
Schweisguth (Sciences Po (OFCE))1

This version: July 2009

https://www.ofce.sciences-po.fr/pdf/dtravail/WP2009-18.pdf

 

 

 

An Anatomy of the Global Trade Slowdown based on the WIOD 2016 Release

Marcel P. Timmer, Bart Los,
Robert Stehrer, and Gaaitzen J. de Vries

December 2016

https://www.rug.nl/ggdc/html_publications/memorandum/gd162.pdf

Credit Chains and Production Networks

Credit Chains and Production Networks

There are three kind of flows in a Supply Chain

  • Goods
  • Information
  • Financial

 

Credit Terms in a Supplier Buyer contracts determine payment delays which accumulate in current accounts of a Firm.

  • Account Receivables
  • Account Payables

 

Credit Relations

  • Bank to Bank
  • Bank to Firm
  • Firm to Firm

Dyad of Credit Relations

  • Supplier – Buyer

 

Triad of Credit Relations

  • Supplier – Bank – Buyer

Sources of Systemic Risk

  • Failure of a Firm and its impact on Suppliers and Customers (Flow of Goods)
  • Failure of a Bank and its impact on Trade Credit
  • Credit Contraction due to de-risking by the Banks
  • Decline in Correspondent Banking relations and its impact on Trade Finance

 

From Credit Chains and Sectoral Co-movement: Does the Use of Trade
Credit Amplify Sectoral Shocks?

Trade credit is an important source of short-term financing for firms, not only in the U.S., as documented by Petersen and Rajan (1997), but also around the World. For instance, accounts payables are larger than short-term debt in 60 percent of the countries covered by Worldscope. Also, across the world most firms simultaneously receive credit from their suppliers and grant it to their customers, which tend to be concentrated on specific sectors.  These characteristics of trade credit financing have led some authors to propose it as a mechanism for the propagation and amplification of idiosyncratic shocks. The intuition behind the mechanism is straightforward; a firm that faces a default by its customers may run into liquidity problems that force it to default to its own suppliers. Therefore, in a network of firms that borrow from each other, a temporary shock to the liquidity of some firms may cause a chain reaction in which other firms also get in financial difficulties, thus resulting in a large and persistent decline in aggregate activity. This idea was first formalized by Kiyotaki and Moore (1997) in a partial equilibrium setting, and has been recently extended to a general equilibrium environment by Cardoso-Lecourtois (2004), and Boissay (2006) who have also provided evidence of the potential quantitative importance of the mechanism by calibrating their models to the cases of Mexico and the U.S., respectively.

From Ontology of Bankruptcy Diffusion through Trade Credit
Channel

A supply network is a network of entities interacting to transform raw material into finished product for customers. Since interdependencies among supply network members on material, information, and finance are becoming increasingly intensive, financial status of one firm not only depends on its own management, but also on the performance and behaviours of other members. Therefore, understanding the financial flows variability and the material interactions is a key to quantify the risk of a firm. Due to the complex structure and dynamic interactions of modern supply networks, there are some difficulties faced by pure analysis approaches in analyzing financial status of the supply network members and the high degree of nonlinear interactions between them. Mathematical and operation research models usually do not function very well for this kind of financial decision making. These models always start with many assumptions and have difficulties modeling such complex systems that include many entities, relationships, features, parameters, and constraints. In addition, traditional modeling and analysis tools lack the ability to predict the impact of a specific event on the performance of the entire supply network.  Current financial data analysis with large volumes of structure data cannot offer the full picture and intrinsic insights into the risk nature of a company. Motivated by the literature gap in risk monitoring in investment background and limitations of analysis approaches for handling bankruptcy contagion phenomenon, we propose an ontological approach to present a formal, shared conceptualization of this domain knowledge.

From Inter-Firm Trade Finance in Times of Crisis

The severe recession that is hitting the global economy, with very low or even negative growth rates, has caused widespread contractions in international trade, both in developed and developing countries. World Trade Organization (WTO) has forecast that exports will decline by roughly 9% in volume terms in 2009 due to the collapse in global demand brought on by the biggest economic downturn in decades. The contraction in developed countries will be particularly severe with exports falling by 10%. In developing countries, which account for one-third of world trade, exports will shrink by some 2% to 3% in 2009.

The contraction in international trade has been accompanied by a sharp decline in the availability of trade finance. This decline is only partly explained by the contraction in demand: according to a BAFT (Banker’s Association for Trade and Finance) and International Monetary Fund (IMF) joint survey (2009), flows of trade finance to developed countries have fallen by 6% relative to the previous year, more than the reduction in trade flows, suggesting that part of the fall reflects a disruption of financial intermediation. The contraction in value of trade finance has also been accompanied by a sharp increase in its price. Fear that the decline in trade finance and the increase in its cost would accelerate the slowdown of world trade has triggered a number of government initiatives in support of trade finance (Chauffour and Farole,2009).

The situation is especially worrisome for firms operating in developing countries which rely heavily on trade finance to support both their exports and imports.1 With a restricted access to financing and an increased cost of financing, these firms may find difficulties in maintaining their production and trade activities.

 

Please see my related posts:

Supply Chain Finance (SCF) / Financial Supply Chain Management (F-SCM)

Production Chain Length and Boundary Crossings in Global Value Chains

Intra Industry Trade and International Production and Distribution Networks

Understanding Trade in Intermediate Goods

Trends in Intra Firm Trade of USA

Production and Distribution Planning : Strategic, Global, and Integrated

Development of Global Trade and Production Accounts: UN SEIGA Initiative

The Dollar Shortage, Again! in International Wholesale Money Markets

FDI vs Outsourcing: Extending Boundaries or Extending Network Chains of Firms

The Collapse of Global Trade during Global Financial Crisis of 2008-2009

Understanding Global Value Chains – G20/OECD/WB Initiative

Economics of Trade Finance

Balance Sheets, Financial Interconnectedness, and Financial Stability – G20 Data Gaps Initiative

Oscillations and Amplifications in Demand-Supply Network Chains

Contagion in Financial (Balance sheets) Networks

 

Key Sources of Research:

 

LIQUIDITY, BUSINESS CYCLES, AND MONETARY POLICY

Nobuhiro Kiyotaki
London School of Economics

John Moore
Edinburgh University and London School of Economics

27 November 2001

https://www.imf.org/external/np/seminars/eng/2008/fincycl/pdf/kimo.pdf

 

 

Credit Cycles

Nobuhiro Kiyotaki; John Moore

The Journal of Political Economy, Vol. 105, No. 2.

(Apr., 1997),

http://www.nviegi.net/teaching/master/km.pdf

 

Credit chains

Nobuhiro Kiyotaki (Princeton University)

John Moore (University of Edinburgh)

Date January 1997

http://www.econ.ed.ac.uk/papers/id118_esedps.pdf

https://www.minneapolisfed.org/research/conferences/research-events—conferences-and-programs/~/media/files/research/events/1997_01-31/Kiyotaki_CreditChains.pdf

 

 

Credit and Business Cycles

N Kiyotaki

1998

https://www.princeton.edu/~kiyotaki/papers/Credit-and-BusinessCycles.pdf

 

 

Inter-Enterprise Credit and Adjustment  During Financial Crises: The Role of Firm Size

Fabrizio Coricelli

Marco Frigerio

July, 2 2016

https://cepr.org/sites/default/files/Coricelli%2C%20Fabrizio%20paper.pdf

 

 

Credit chains and bankruptcy propagation in production networks

Stefano Battiston, Domenico Delli Gatti, Mauro Gallegati,
Bruce Greenwald, Joseph E. Stiglitz

2007

https://www8.gsb.columbia.edu/faculty/jstiglitz/sites/jstiglitz/files/2007_Credit_Chains.pdf

 

 

Trade Finance in Crisis : Market Adjustment or Market Failure ?

Jean-Pierre Chauffour

Thomas Farole

Date Written: July 1, 2009

https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1437955

Resaleable debt and systemic risk

Jason Roderick Donaldson , Eva Micheler

2018

http://www.jrdonaldson.com/Papers/Donaldson-Micheler-Resaleable_Debt.pdf

 

Supply chains and credit-market shocks: Some implications for emerging markets,

Jinjarak, Yothin (2013)

ADBI Working Paper Series, No. 443

https://www.econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/101241/1/770887406.pdf

 

 

Financial Amplification Mechanisms and the Federal Reserve’s Supply of Liquidity during the Crisis

Asani Sarkar
Jeffrey Shrader

Staff Report no. 431
February 2010

https://www.newyorkfed.org/medialibrary/media/research/staff_reports/sr431.pdf

 

 

Aggregate Fluctuations and the Role of Trade Credit

Lin Shao

2017

https://www.bankofcanada.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/swp2017-37.pdf

 

 

Supply Chain Disruptions and Trade Credit

LU Yi OGURA Yoshiaki

TODO Yasuyuki ZHU Lianming

2017

https://www.rieti.go.jp/jp/publications/dp/17e054.pdf

 

 

Credit Shocks and Aggregate Fluctuations in  an Economy with Production Heterogeneity

Aubhik Khan

Julia K. Thomas

September 2013

https://www.aubhik-khan.net/KhanThomasDCTsept2013.pdf

 

 

Financial Frictions in Production Networks

Saki Bigio

Jennifer La’O

February 7, 2013

https://www0.gsb.columbia.edu/faculty/sbigio/papers/FinancialFrictionsNetworks.pdf

 

Working Paper No. 67, April 2016

http://perueconomics.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/WP-67.pdf

 

 

The Origins of Aggregate Fluctuations in a Credit Network Economy

Levent Altinoglu

October 16, 2016
http://blogs.bu.edu/levent/files/2015/10/Altinoglu_JMP_CurrentVersion.pdf

September 30, 2015

https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/425a/fcb800d01a5b8dce9ed13a4a200bf51f6fed.pdf

 

Consolidated Bibliography

WTO

https://www.wto.org/english/res_e/booksp_e/aid4tradesupplychain13_biblio_e.pdf

 

 

Propagation of Financial Shocks in an Input-Output Economy with Trade and Financial Linkages of Firms

Shaowen Luo

December 4, 2015

http://www.economics.illinois.edu/seminars/documents/Luo.pdf

 

FDI, Trade Credit, and Transmission of Global Liquidity Shocks:
Evidence from Chinese Manufacturing Firms

Shu Lin and Haichun Ye

http://www.econ.cuhk.edu.hk/econ/images/content/news_event/seminars/2016-2017-2nd-semester/Lin–Ye_paper.pdf

 

 

Trade Credit, Financing Structure and Growth

Junjie Xia

October 27, 2016

http://www.junjiexia.com/uploads/7/6/7/2/76726065/jmp_oct16.pdf

 

The impact of corporate distress along the supply chain: evidences from United
States

Lucia Gibilaro

Gianluca Mattarocci

http://www.efmaefm.org/0EFMAMEETINGS/EFMA%20ANNUAL%20MEETINGS/2017-Athens/papers/EFMA2017_0526_fullpaper.pdf

 

 

Does credit crunch investments down?
New evidence on the real eects of the bank-lending channel

Federico Cinganoz Francesco Manaresix Enrico Settex

December 2013

http://www.federicocingano.eu/Credit_crunch_investments.pdf

 

Interwoven Lending, Uncertainty, and Liquidity Hoarding

Adam Zawadowski

December 13, 2017

http://www.personal.ceu.hu/staff/Adam_Zawadowski/papers/credit.pdf

 

 

Trade credit: Elusive insurance of rm growth

DENNIS BAMS, JAAP BOS and MAGDALENA PISA*

October 5, 2016

http://www.research.mbs.ac.uk/accounting-finance/Portals/0/Users/002/02/2/Trade%20credit%20Elusive%20insurance%20of%20firm%20growth%202016.pdf

 

 

Chain Reactions, Trade Credit and the Business Cycle

Miguel Cardoso-Lecourtois

http://fmwww.bc.edu/RePEc/esNASM04/up.4593.1075462930.pdf

 

From production networks to geographical economics.

Gérard Weisbuch, Stefano Battiston.

Journal ofEconomic Behavior and Organization, Elsevier, 2007, 64 (3- 4), pp.448

https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-00531863/document

 

 

Production networks and failure avalanches

Gerard Weisbuch
Stefano Battiston

March 5, 2018

https://arxiv.org/pdf/physics/0507101.pdf

 

 

Self-organised patterns in production networks

Gerard Weisbuch

October 10, 2005

http://www.lps.ens.fr/~weisbuch/gwcomplexus.pdf

 

 

Networks : Propagation of Shocks over Economic Networks

Daron Acemoglu

July 22, 2014.

https://economics.mit.edu/files/9790

 

 

Debt-Rank Analysis of Financial Distress Propagation on a Production Network in Japan

FUJIWARA Yoshi
University of Hyogo
TERAI Masaaki
RIKEN
FUJITA Yuji
Turnstone Research Institute, Inc.
SOUMA Wataru
Nihon University

https://www.rieti.go.jp/jp/publications/dp/16e046.pdf

 

 

Operational causes of bankruptcy propagation in supply chain

Zhongsheng Hua ⁎, Yanhong Sun 1, Xiaoyan Xu

2011

http://isiarticles.com/bundles/Article/pre/pdf/48280.pdf

 

 

Propagation of Financial Shocks in an Input-Output Economy with Trade and Financial Linkages of Firms

Shaowen Luo
September 20, 2015

http://www.econ.vt.edu/seminars/Seminar%20Papers/2016/10-02-15Luo.pdf

 

 

From Micro to Macro via Production Networks

Vasco M. Carvalho

http://www.crei.cat/wp-content/uploads/users/working-papers/carvalho_from_micro.pdf

 

 

Trade Credit and the  Propagation of Corporate Failure: An Empirical
Analysis

Tor Jacobson and Erik von Schedvin
August 2012

https://www.econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/81882/1/723939764.pdf

 

CREDIT MARKET DISRUPTIONS AND LIQUIDITY SPILLOVER EFFECTS IN THE SUPPLY CHAIN

Anna M. Costello

August 8, 2017

https://www.gsb.stanford.edu/sites/gsb/files/costello-anna-acctgcamp2017_0.pdf

 

Modeling defaults of companies in multi-stage supply chain networks

Kamil J.Mizgier, StephanM.Wagner,, JanuszA.Holyst

2010

http://mars.if.pw.edu.pl/~jholyst/Mizgier_etal_InPress_Modeling_defaults_of.pdf

 

 

 

The origins of scale-free production networks

Stanislao Gualdizand Antoine Mandelx

June 28, 2015

http://www.siecon.org/online/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/Gualdi.pdf

 

 

Optimization of order policies in supply networks

S. GÄottlich¤ M. Hertyy C. Ringhoferz

August 18, 2008

https://www.ki-net.umd.edu/pubs/files/FRG-2008-Ringhofer-Christian.FRG_Ringhofer_Orders080814.pdf

 

Financial Instability after Minsky: Heterogeneity, Agent Based Models and Credit
Networks

Domenico Delli Gatti

April 10, 2012

https://www.ineteconomics.org/uploads/papers/delli-gatti-domenico-berlin-paper.pdf

 

Measuring the Systemic Risk in Inter firm Transaction Networks

Makoto Hazama
And
Iichiro Uesugi

http://hermes-ir.lib.hit-u.ac.jp/rs/bitstream/10086/28392/1/wp066.pdf

 

Systemic Risk Assessment in Complex Supply Networks

Anna Ledwoch, Alexandra Brintrup, J¨orn Mehnen, Ashutosh Tiwari

https://pure.strath.ac.uk/portal/files/66716085/Ledwoch_etal_SJ_2016_Systemic_risk_assessment_in_complex_supply_networks.pdf

 

TRADE CREDIT DEFAULTS AND LIQUIDITY PROVISION BY FIRMS

Reint Gropp
Frédéric Boissay

2007

https://www.ecb.europa.eu/pub/pdf/scpwps/ecbwp753.pdf

 

The future of agent-based modelling.

Matteo Richiardi

Institute for New Economic Thinking and Nuffield College, Oxford, United Kingdom
Collegio Carlo Alberto, Moncalieri, Italy

This draft: June 2015

https://www.nuffield.ox.ac.uk/media/1702/abmfuture-v12.pdf

 

 

Financially Constrained Fluctuations in an Evolving Network Economy

Domenico Delli Gatti
Mauro Gallegati
Bruce Greenwald
Alberto Russo
Joseph E. Stiglitz

http://terna.to.it/ABM-BaF09/presentations/DelliGatti%28presentation%29_ABM.pdf

 

 

Credit Chains and Sectoral Comovement: Does the Use of Trade Credit Amplify Sectoral Shocks?

Claudio Raddatz

The World Bank
March, 2007

http://www.webmeets.com/files/papers/LACEA-LAMES/2007/335/Credit_chains_051707_withtables.pdf

 

 

Linkages and spillovers in global production networks: firm-level analysis of the Czech automotive industry

Petr Pavlinek

Pavla Žížalová

https://digitalcommons.unomaha.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1039&context=geoggeolfacpub

 

Ontology of Bankruptcy Diffusion through Trade Credit
Channel

Lin Cheng

Huaiqing Wang

Huaping Chen

https://50years.acs.org.au/content/dam/acs/50-years/journals/jrpit/JRPIT44.4.401.pdf

 

OPTIMAL ORDER AND DISTRIBUTION STRATEGIES IN PRODUCTION NETWORKS

Simone Gottlich, Michael Herty, and Christian Ringhofer

https://math.la.asu.edu/~chris/SpringerOpt10.pdf

 

Profitability, Trade Credit and Institutional Structure of Production

Michael Gofman
December 9, 2013

http://gofman.info/TC/Supplier-Customer%20Network.pdf

 

The Economics of Information and Financial
Networks

Stefano Battiston
July 22, 2016

https://simpolproject.eu/download/simpol-initiative-research/battiston2016information.pdf

 

Supply Chain Perspectives and Issues: A Literature Review

Albert Park
Gaurav Nayyar
Patrick Low

http://www.asiaglobalinstitute.hku.hk/en/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/supply-chain-perspectives-and-issues.pdf

 

 

LIAISONS DANGEREUSES: INCREASING CONNECTIVITY, RISK SHARING, AND SYSTEMIC RISK

Stefano Battiston
Domenico Delli Gatti
Mauro Gallegati
Bruce C. Greenwald
Joseph E. Stiglitz

http://www.nber.org/papers/w15611.pdf

 

 

Inter-Firm Trade Finance in Times of Crisis

Anna Maria C. Menichini

http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/en/649481468314087810/pdf/WPS5112.pdf

 

 

Reducing the Probability of Bankruptcy Through Supply Chain Coordination

Xiaoyan Xu, Yanhong Sun, and Zhongsheng Hua

2010

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Yanhong_Sun5/publication/220508846_Reducing_the_Probability_of_Bankruptcy_Through_Supply_Chain_Coordination/links/573eac9d08ae298602e6e77a.pdf

 

 

Pathways towards instability in financial networks

Marco Bardoscia, Stefano Battiston Fabio Caccioli & Guido Caldarelli

2017

http://lims.ac.uk/wp-content/uploads/bardoscia2017pathways-1.pdf

 

 

International Credit Supply Shocks

Ambrogio Cesa-Bianchiy Andrea Ferreroz Alessandro Rebuccix

June 16, 2017

https://www.bostonfed.org/-/media/Documents/events/2017/boston-policy-workshop/AlessandroRebucci.pdf?la=en

 

Risk Propagation through Payment Distortion in Supply Chains

Alejandro Serrano

Rogelio Oliva

Santiago Kraiselburd

https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/5b5f/0e6d7dc9d4b4f6bcada884b71562791404ed.pdf

 

 

Payment Defaults and Interfirm Liquidity Provision

https://academic.oup.com/rof/article-abstract/17/6/1853/1591419

 

SYSTEMIC RISK: A SURVEY

BY OLIVIER DE BANDT
AND PHILIPP HARTMANN

November 2000

https://www.econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/152469/1/ecbwp0035.pdf

 

 

Risk Propagation in Supply Chains

Alejandro Serrano

Rogelio Oliva

Santiago Kraiselburd

https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/2db1/f3278ab2a75ff11b0142fba19a4cf223805a.pdf

 

 

How Inventory Is (Should Be) Financed: Trade Credit in Supply Chains with Demand
Uncertainty and Costs of Financial Distress

Song (Alex) Yang, John R. Birge

http://faculty.chicagobooth.edu/workshops/omscience/past/more/pdf/YangBirge_trade%20credit.pdf

https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2746645

https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1734682

 

 

The Supply Chain Effects of Bankruptcy

S. Alex Yang

John R. Birge, Rodney P. Parker

https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/6efb/86a8667f24af2c6a5cd7eb52bbd12b39697b.pdf

http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.715.5812&rep=rep1&type=pdf

 

Supply Chain Management: Supplier Financing Schemes and Inventory Strategies

Min Wang

https://www8.gsb.columbia.edu/programs/sites/programs/files/abstracts/Min_Wang_Dissertation.pdf

 

Foreign Investment and Supply Chains in Emerging Markets: Recurring Problems and Demonstrated Solutions

Theodore H. Moran

PIIE

2014

https://piie.com/publications/wp/wp14-12.pdf

 

Improving cash flow using credit management
The outline case

http://www.cimaglobal.com/Documents/ImportedDocuments/cid_improving_cashflow_using_credit_mgm_Apr09.pdf.pdf

 

CREDIT CHAINS AND THE PROPAGATION OF
FINANCIAL DISTRESS

2006

by Frederic Boissay

http://sdw.zentral-bank.eu/pub/pdf/scpwps/ecbwp573.pdf

 

Exposure to international crises: trade vs. financial contagion

Everett Grant

2016

https://www.esrb.europa.eu/pub/pdf/wp/esrbwp30.en.pdf?7b7cc950c1a2286d395ed8489bfde5c7

 

 

Credit Contagion and Trade Credit Supply:
Evidence from Small Business Data in Japan

TSURUTA Daisuke

https://www.rieti.go.jp/jp/publications/dp/07e043.pdf

 

 

The Price of Complexity in Financial Networks

Joseph Stiglitz

2017

https://www8.gsb.columbia.edu/faculty/jstiglitz/sites/jstiglitz/files/The%20Price%20of%20Complexity%20in%20Financial%20Networks.pdf

 

 

The Price of Complexity in Financial Networks

S. Battiston

2017

https://www.jbs.cam.ac.uk/fileadmin/user_upload/research/centres/risk/downloads/160913_slides_battison.pdf