Supply Chain Finance (SCF) / Financial Supply Chain Management (F-SCM)

Supply Chain Finance (SCF) / Financial Supply Chain Management (F-SCM)

 

 

From STANDARD DEFINITIONS FOR TECHNIQUES OF SUPPLY CHAIN FINANCE

fscm8

There are two Areas where FSCM/SCF names are used but in different contexts.

  • Inter firm FSCM
  • Intra firm FSCM

 

Inter firm F-SCM

  • Trade Finance
  • Supply Chain Finance (SCF)
  • Value Chain Finance
  • Supplier Finance
  • Inter firm Finance
  • Reverse Factoring
  • Collaborative  Cash to Cash Cycles Management

During 2008 global financial crisis, the trade financing dried up resulting in decline in trade of goods and services.

Since the crisis, Financial De-globalization and Decline of Correspondent Banking has also made availability of financial credit harder.

Cash flow and working capital management is helped by inter firm collaboration among Suppliers and Buyers.

Financial Institutions which provide trade credit also benefit from inter firm collaboration.

 From SUPPLY CHAIN FINANCE FUNDAMENTALS: What It Is, What It’s Not and How it Works

What Supply Chain Finance is Not

The world of trade finance is complex and varied. There are numerous ways to increase business capital on hand and, in many cases, the differences are slightly nuanced. Given this landscape, it’s not just important to understand what supply chain finance is; it’s also important to understand what it is not.

It is not a loan. Supply chain finance is an extension of the buyer’s accounts payable and is not considered financial debt. For the supplier, it represents a non-recourse, true sale of receivables. There is no lending on either side of the buyer/supplier equation, which means there is no impact to balance sheets.

It is not dynamic discounting or an early payment program. Early payment programs, such as dynamic discounting, are buyer-initiated programs where buyers offer suppliers earlier payments in return for discounts on their invoices. Unlike supply chain finance, buyers are seeking to lower their cost of goods, not to improve their cash flow. Dynamic discounting and early payment programs often turn out to be expensive for both suppliers (who are getting paid less than agreed upon) and buyers who tie up their own cash to fund the programs.

It is not factoring. Factoring enables a supplier to sell its invoices to a factoring agent (in most cases, a financial institution) in return for earlier, but partial, payment. Suppliers initiate the arrangement without the buyer’s involvement. Thus factoring is typically much more expensive than buyer-initiated supply chain finance. Also, suppliers trade “all or nothing” meaning they have no choice to participate from month-to-month to the degree that their cash flow needs dictate. Finally, most factoring programs are recourse loans, meaning if a supplier has received payment against an invoice that the buyer subsequently does not pay, the lender has recourse to claw back the funds.

 

From Mckinsey on Payments

fscm10

 

From Financial Supply Chain Management

financial-supply-chain-management-4-728

 

From Best Practices in Cash Flow Management and Reporting

46_-3571_20

 

From STANDARD DEFINITIONS FOR TECHNIQUES OF SUPPLY CHAIN FINANCE

fscm9

 

From Financing GPNs through inter-firm collaboration?
Insights from the automotive industry in Germany and Brazil

fscm 3

 

Intra Firm F-SCM

  • Working Capital Management
  • Cash Flow Management
  • Liquidity Management
  • Cash to Cash Conversion Cycle Management (C2C Cycle/CCC)
  • Financial Supply Chain Management (F-SCM) in Manufacturing companies
  • Financial Supply chain management in financial institutions
  • Supply Chain Finance
  • Accounts Payable Optimization
  • Accounts Receivable Optimization
  • Operations and Finance Interfaces
  • Current Asset Management (Current Ratio Analysis)

This is not a new subject.  Corporate Finance, Financial Controls, and working capital management have been active business issues.  Benefits of Supply chain management include increase in inventory turnover and decline in current assets.

There are many world class companies who manage their supply chains well and work with minimal working capital.  Lean Manufacturing, Agile Manufacturing, JIT manufacturing are related concepts.  Just-In-Time manufacturing developed in Toyota Corp. reduces inventory portion of C2C cycle.  Other examples include

  • Apple
  • Walmart
  • Dell

Currently, most of the Supply Chain analytics efforts unfortunately do not integrate analysis of financial benefits of operating decisions.

There are many studies recently which suggest that Cash to Cash Conversion Cycle is a better determinant of corporate liquidity.  C2C Cycle is a dynamic liquidity indicator and Current Assets is a static indicator of liquidity.  I would like to point out that none of the studies relate C2C cycle with Current Ratio.  Current Ratio is based on balance sheet positions of current assets and current liabilities.  C2C cycle is based on flows in supply chains.  Accumulation of flow results in Current assets (Stock).  To make it Stock-Flow Consistent, more work is required.

 

From Supply Chain Finance: some conceptual insights.

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From Financial Supply Chain Management

financial-supply-chain-management-5-728

 

From The Interface of Operations and Finance in Global Supply Chains

fscm4

 

From SUPPLY CHAIN-ORIENTED APPROACH OF WORKING CAPITAL MANAGEMENT

ifscm5

 

From IMPROVING FIRM PERFORMANCE THROUGH VALUE-DRIVEN SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT: A CASH CONVERSION CYCLE APPROACH

fscm6

 

From IMPROVING FIRM PERFORMANCE THROUGH VALUE-DRIVEN SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT: A CASH CONVERSION CYCLE APPROACH

fscm7

 

From THE CYCLE TIMES OF WORKING CAPITAL: FINANCIAL VALUE CHAIN ANALYSIS METHOD

fscm12

 

Call for papers: Supply Chain Finance

Call for papers for Special Topic Forum in Journal of Purchasing and Supply Management (Manuscript Submission:  March 31, 2017)

Supply chain finance is a concept that lacks definition and conceptual foundation.  However, the recent economic downturn forced corporates to face a series of financial and economic difficulties that strongly increased supply chain financial risk, including bankruptcy or over-leveraging of debt.  The mitigation and management of supply chain financial risk is becoming an increasingly important topic for both practitioners and academics leading to a developing area of study known as supply chain finance.  There are two major perspectives related to the idea of managing finance across the supply chain.  The first is a relatively short-term solution that serves as more of a “bridge” and that is provided by financial institutions, focused on accounts payables and receivables.  The second is more of a supply chain oriented perspective – which may or may not involve a financial institution, focused on working capital optimization in terms of accounts payable, receivable, inventory, and asset management.  These longer-term solutions focus on strategically managing financial implications across the supply chain.

Recent years have seen a considerable reduction in the granting of new loans, with a significant increase in the cost of corporate borrowing (Ivashina and Scharfstein, 2010). Such collapse of the asset and mortgage-backed markets dried up liquidity from industries (Cornett et al., 2011). In such difficult times, firms (especially those with stronger bargaining power) forced suppliers to extend trade credit in order to supplement the reduction in other forms of financing (Coulibaly et al., 2013; Garcia-Appendini and Montoriol-Garriga, 2013). The general lack of liquidity, in particular for SMEs, has directly affected companies’ ability to stay in the market, reflecting on the stability of entire supply chains. There are many other factors influencing liquidity and financial health that are critical to assess.

These trends and the continued growth of outsourced spend have contributed considerably to the need for and spread of solutions and programs that help to mitigate and better manage financial risk within and across the supply chain.  One of the most important approaches is what is being termed Supply Chain Finance (SCF) (Gelsomino et al., 2016; Pfohl and Gomm, 2009; Wuttke et al., 2013a). SCF is an approach for two or more organizations in a supply chain, including external service provides, to jointly create value through means of planning, steering, and controlling the flow of financial resources on an inter-organizational level (Hofmann, 2005; Wuttke et al., 2013b).  It involves the inter-company optimization of financial flows with customers, suppliers and service providers to increase the value of the supply chain members  (Pfohl and Gomm, 2009).  According to Lamoureux and Evans (2011) supply chain financial solutions, processes, methods are designed to improve the effectiveness of financial supply chains by preventing detrimental cost shifting and improving the visibility, availability, delivery and cost of cash for all global value chain partners.  The benefits of the SCF approach include reduction of working capital, access to more funding at lower costs, risk reduction, as well as increase of trust, commitment, and profitability through the chain (Randall and Farris II, 2009).

Literature on SCF is still underdeveloped and a multidisciplinary approach to research is needed in this area. In order to better harmonize contributions of a more financial nature with ones coming from the perspective of purchasing & supply chain, there is a need of developing theory on SCF, starting with a comprehensive definition of those instruments or solutions that constitute the SCF landscape. SCF has been neglected in the Purchasing & Supply Management (PSM) literature, although PSM plays a critical role in managing finance within the supply chain.  PSM uses many of the processes and tools that are part of a comprehensive supply chain financial program to better manage the supply base, in terms of relationships, total cost of ownership, cost strategies and pricing volatility (see for example Shank and Govindarajan 1992). Reverse factoring is a technique which is also widely used to manage the supply base (Wuttke et al, 2013a) as is supplier development and investment in suppliers.

Research on SCF from a PSM perspective needs further development. In particular, empirical evidence would prove useful for testing existing models and hypotheses, addressing the more innovative schemes and investigating the adoption level and the state of the art of different solutions. Research is also needed for the development of a general theory of supply chain finance.  There is also limited research that focuses on the link between supply chain financial tools and supply chain financial performance.  Finally, considering the plurality of solutions that shape the SCF landscape, literature should move towards the definition of holistic instruments to choose the best SCF strategy for a supply chain, considering its financial performance and the contextual variables (e.g. structure, bargaining power) that characterize it.

Potential topics

The purpose of this special topic forum is to publish high-quality, theoretical and empirical papers addressing advances on Supply Chain Finance. Original, high quality contributions that are neither published nor currently under review by any other journals are sought. Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Theory development, concept and definition of SCF
  • Taxonomy of SCF solutions
  • Strategic cost management across the supply chain
  • Total cost of ownership
  • Life cycle assessment and analysis
  • Commodity risk and pricing volatility
  • Supply chain financial metrics and measures
  • Cost-benefit analysis
  • Relationship implications of supply chain finance
  • Tax and transfer pricing in the supply chain
  • Foreign exchange and global currency and financing risk
  • Financial network design and financial supply chain flows
  • The organizational perspective on SCF and the implementation process
  • Role of innovative technologies to support SCF ( (e.g. block chain, internet of things)
  • Supply chain collaboration for improved supply chain financial solutions
  • SCF adoption models, enablers and barriers
  • SCF from different party perspectives (especially suppliers and providers)
  • SCF and risk mitigation and management

Manuscript preparation and submission

Before submission, authors should carefully read the Journal’s “Instructions for Authors”. The review process will follow the Journal’s normal practice. Prospective authors should submit an electronic copy of their complete manuscript via Elsevier’s manuscript submission system (https://ees.elsevier.com/jpsm) selecting “STF Supply Chain Finance” as submission category and specifying the Supply Chain Finance topic in the accompanying letter. Manuscripts are due March 31, 2017 with expected publication in June of 2018.

FOR COMMENTS OR QUESTIONS PLEASE CONTACT THE GUEST EDITORS:

Federico Caniato, Politecnico di Milano, School of Management, federico.caniato@polimi.it

Michael Henke, TU Dortmund and Fraunhofer IML, Michael.Henke@iml.fraunhofer.de

George A. Zsidisin, Virginia Commonwealth University, gazsidisin@vcu.edu

References

Cornett, M.M., McNutt, J.J., Strahan, P.E., Tehranian, H., 2011. Liquidity risk management and credit supply in the financial crisis. J. financ. econ. 101, 297–312.

Coulibaly, B., Sapriza, H., Zlate, A., 2013. Financial frictions, trade credit, and the 2008–09 global financial crisis. Int. Rev. Econ. Financ. 26, 25–38.

Garcia-Appendini, E., Montoriol-Garriga, J., 2013. Firms as liquidity providers: Evidence from the 2007–2008 financial crisis. J. financ. econ. 109, 272–291.

Gelsomino, L.M., Mangiaracina, R., Perego, A., Tumino, A., 2016. Supply Chain Finance: a literature review. Int. J. Phys. Distrib. Logist. Manag. 46, 1–19.

Govindarajan, Vijay, and John K. Shank. “Strategic cost management: tailoring controls to strategies.” Journal of Cost Management 6.3 (1992): 14-25.

Wuttke, D. A., Blome, C., Foerstl, K., & Henke, M. (2013a). Managing the innovation adoption of supply chain finance—Empirical evidence from six European case studies. Journal of Business Logistics, 34(2), 148-166.

Wuttke, D. A., Blome, C., & Henke, M. (2013b). Focusing the financial flow of supply chains: An empirical investigation of financial supply chain management. International journal of production economics, 145(2), 773-789.

Hofmann, E., 2005. Supply Chain Finance: some conceptual insights. Logistik Manag. Innov. Logistikkonzepte. Wiesbad. Dtsch. Univ. 203–214.

Ivashina, V., Scharfstein, D., 2010. Bank lending during the financial crisis of 2008. J. financ. econ. 97, 319–338.

Lamoureux, J.-F., Evans, T.A., 2011. Supply Chain Finance: A New Means to Support the Competitiveness and Resilience of Global Value Chains. Social Science Research Network, Rochester, NY.

Lekkakos, S.D., Serrano, A., 2016. Supply chain finance for small and medium sized enterprises: the case of reverse factoring. Int. J. Phys. Distrib. Logist. Manag.

Pfohl, H.C., Gomm, M., 2009. Supply chain finance: optimizing financial flows in supply chains. Logist. Res. 1, 149–161.

Randall, W., Farris II, T., 2009. Supply chain financing: using cash-to-cash variables to strengthen the supply chain. Int. J. Phys. Distrib. Logist. Manag. 39, 669–689.

 

 

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Key Sources of Research:

 

SUPPLY CHAIN FINANCE FUNDAMENTALS: What It Is, What It’s Not and How it Works

http://primerevenue.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/supplychainFundamentals.pdf

Call for papers: Supply Chain Finance

Call for papers for Special Topic Forum in Journal of Purchasing and Supply Management (Manuscript Submission:  March 31, 2017)

https://www.journals.elsevier.com/journal-of-purchasing-and-supply-management/call-for-papers/call-for-papers-supply-chain-finance

 

FINANCIAL SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT – CHALLENGES AND OBSTACLES

Peter Kristofik, Jenny Kok, Sybren de Vries, Jenny van Sten-van’t Hoff

2012

http://www.journals.acrn.eu/resources/Journals/Joe022012/201202h.pdf

 

 

Supply chain finance: optimizing financial flows in supply chains

Hans-Christian Pfohl • Moritz Gomm

2009

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Hans_Christian_Pfohl/publication/220232986_Supply_Chain_Finance-_Optimizing_Financial_Flows_in_Supply_Chains/links/5576960408ae75363751afb1.pdf

 

 

Supply Chain Finance: some conceptual insights.

Hofmann, E. (2005)

In: Lasch, R./ Janker, C.G. (Hrsg.): Logistik Management – Innovative Logistikkonzepte, Wiesbaden
2005, S. 203-214.

https://www.alexandria.unisg.ch/22597/1/Supply%20Chain%20Finance.pdf

 

 

Financial Supply Chain Management – A review

Georgios Vousinas

2017

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/320196808_Financial_Supply_Chain_Management_-_A_review

 

 

Basic areas of management of finance flow in supply chains

Marlena Grabowska1

Częstochowa University of Technology

https://www.czasopismologistyka.pl/artykuly-naukowe/send/301-artykuly-drukowane/4621-artykul

 

THE FLOW OF FINANCIAL RESOURCES:AN INEVITABLE PART OF SUPPLY CHAIN
DESIGN ACTIVITIES

ERIK HOFMANN

https://www.alexandria.unisg.ch/50999/1/Hofmann_The%20flow%20of%20financial%20resources%20-%20An%20inevitable%20part%20of%20supply%20chain%20design%20activities.pdf

 

Motorola’s global financial supply chain strategy

Ian D. Blackman

Christopher P. Holland

Timothy Westcott

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Ian_Blackman/publication/256462716_Motorola%27s_global_financial_supply_chain_strategy/links/0c960522de3de564bb000000/Motorolas-global-financial-supply-chain-strategy.pdf

A SUPPLY CHAIN-ORIENTED APPROACH OF WORKING CAPITAL MANAGEMENT

 

Erik Hofmann

Herbert Kotzab

2010

 

http://www.academia.edu/download/38511199/Hofmann_et_al-2010-Journal_of_Business_Logistics.pdf

Financial Supply Chain Management – Neue Herausforderungen für die Finanz- und Logistikwelt.

Pfohl, H.-Chr./ Hofmann, E./ Elbert, R. (2003):

In: Logistik Management 5 (2003) 4, S. 10-26

https://www.alexandria.unisg.ch/29035/1/Financial%20Supply%20Chain%20Management.pdf

 

Financing GPNs through inter-firm collaboration?
Insights from the automotive industry in Germany and Brazil

Christian Baumeister
Hans-Martin Zademach

http://www.ku.de/fileadmin/150304/img/Publikationen/MDW_21__2013__Financing_GPNs.pdf

 

 

Die Financial Chain im Supply Chain Management: Konzeptionelle Einordnung und Identifikation von Werttreibern.

Franke, J./ Pfaff, D./ Elbert, R./ Gomm, M./ Hofmann, E. (2005):

In: Ferstel, O. K./ Sinz, E. J./ Eckert, S./ Isselhorst, T. (Hrsg.): Wirtschaftsinformatik 2005. eEcono‐my, eGovernment, eSociety. Heidelberg 2005, S. 567‐584

https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/ced5/8858fcdb171db931b3c033bb1cdf55ea7683.pdf

 

 

Financial-Chain-Management
Ein generisches Modell zur Identifikation von Verbesserungspotenzialen

Donovan Pfaff
Bernd Skiera
TimWeitzel

http://www.e-docs-standards.de/cms/images/Publikationen/wi2004_2_107-117.pdf

 

 

The Effects of Cross-Functional Integration on Profitability, Process
Efficiency, and Asset Productivity

Morgan Swink and Tobias Schoenherr

http://www.logisticsexpert.org/top_articles/2016/2016%20-%20Research%20-%20JBL%20-%20The%20Effects%20of%20Cross-Functional%20Integration%20on%20Profitability,%20Process%20Efficiency.pdf

 

 

Quantifying and setting off network performance

Erik Hofmann

2006

https://www.alexandria.unisg.ch/30679/1/Quantifying%20Network%20Performance_final%20version.pdf

 

 

Developing and discussing a supply chain-oriented model of collaborative working capital management

by
Erik Hofmann, University of St.Gallen, Switzerland
& Herbert Kotzab, Copenhagen Business School, Denmark

2006

 

http://www.academia.edu/download/39750008/Developing_and_discussing_a_supply_chain20151106-23047-gve831.pdf

 

 

The link between Purchasing and Supply Management maturity
models and the financial performance of international firms

Fábio Pollice
Afonso Fleury

 

http://ejournal.narotama.ac.id/files/The%20link%20between%20purchasing%20and%20supply%20management%20maturity%20models%20and%20the%20financial%20performance%20of%20international%20firms.pdf

 

 

SUPPLY CHAIN FINANCE
A Buyer-Centric Supplier Payables Financing Initiative

Martin Jemdahl
Lund, 2015

http://lup.lub.lu.se/luur/download?func=downloadFile&recordOId=8870575&fileOId=8870576

 

 

Supply Chain Finance: Optimal Introduction and Adoption Decisions

David A. Wuttke, Constantin Blome, H. Sebastian Heese and Margarita
Protopappa-Sieke

http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/61216/1/__smbhome.uscs.susx.ac.uk_qlfd7_Desktop_Supply%20Chain%20Finance%20Blome.pdf

 

 

The Value of Supply Chain Finance

Xiangfeng Chen and Chenxi Hu

https://cdn.intechopen.com/pdfs-wm/17676.pdf

 

Supply Chain Finance “Is SCF ready to be applied in SMEs?”

Jan H Jansen

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Jan_Jansen11/publication/305391903_Supply_Chain_Finance_Is_SCF_ready_to_be_applied_in_SMEs/links/578cb87508ae5c86c9a6355b.pdf

 

 

Win-win and no-win situations in supply chain finance: The case of accounts receivable programs

Erik Hoffman

https://www.alexandria.unisg.ch/248126/1/Triple-win-situations%20in%20supply%20chain%20finance_final.pdf

 

Introducing a financial perspective in Supply Chain Management: a literature review on Supply Chain Finance

Luca M. Gelsomino, Riccardo Mangiaracina,
Alessandro Perego, Angela Tumino

http://www.summerschool-aidi.it/edition-2015/images/ancona2014/sessione5/gelsomino_et_al.pdf

 

 

Towards A Theory Of Supply Chain And Finance Using Evidence From A Scottish Focus Group

R. de Boer, R. Dekkers, L. M. Gelsomino, C. de Goeij, M. Steeman Q. Zhou,
S. Sinclair, V. Souter

2017

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Ronald_De_Boer3/publication/320417203_Towards_A_Theory_Of_Supply_Chain_And_Finance_Using_Evidence_From_A_Scottish_Focus_Group/links/59e4875fa6fdcc7154e11430/Towards-A-Theory-Of-Supply-Chain-And-Finance-Using-Evidence-From-A-Scottish-Focus-Group.pdf

 

 

WORKING CAPITAL MANAGEMENT IN SUPPLY CHAINS

Nataliia G. Silaeva

2016

https://dspace.spbu.ru/bitstream/11701/5194/1/Master_thesis_Silaeva_Nataliya.pdf

 

 

Blockchain-driven supply chain finance: Towards a conceptual framework from a buyer perspective

Yaghoob Omrana, Michael Henkeb, Roger Heinesc, Erik Hofmann

https://www.alexandria.unisg.ch/251095/1/WP29-Blockchain-driven%20supply%20chain%20finance%20Towards%20a%20conceptual%20framework%20from%20a%20buyer%20perspective.pdf

 

 

Selecting financial service providers for supply chains: How cross-functional collaboration can improve effectiveness and efficiency

Judith Martin

Prof. Dr. Erik Hofmann

https://www.alexandria.unisg.ch/242145/1/Paper%20Full%20Version_Selecting%20financial%20service%20providers%20for%20supply%20chains.pdf

 

 

Supply chain finance as a value added service offered by a lead logistics provider

Careaga Franco, V.G.
Award date:
2016

https://pure.tue.nl/ws/files/46923583/840401-1.pdf

 

 

B2B PAYMENTS, SUPPLY CHAIN FINANCE & E-INVOICING MARKET

Mirela Amariei
Tiberiu Avram
Ionela Barbuta
Simona Cristea
Sebastian Lupu
Mihaela Mihaila
Andreea Nita
Adriana Screpnic

2015

https://www.ciosummits.com/B2B_Payments_Supply_Chain_Finance__E-invoicing_Market_Guide_2015.pdf

 

 

Linking corporate strategy and supply chain management

Erik Hofmann

http://www.hadjarian.com/company/1860230.pdf

 

 

Concepts and Trade-Offs in Supply Chain Finance

Kasper van der Vliet

http://alexandria.tue.nl/extra2/792140.pdf

 

 

Supply Chain Finance as a Value Added Service offered by a Lead Logistics Provider

by
Victor Gerardo Careaga Franco

http://alexandria.tue.nl/extra2/afstversl/tm/Careaga_Franco_2016.pdf

 

Value Chain Finance: How Banks can Leverage Growth Opportunities for SME Banking Customers

Qamar Saleem, Global SME Banking and Value Chain Specialist, IFC

Dr. Eugenio Cavenaghi, Managing Director -Trade, Export & Supply Chain Finance, Banco Santander

https://www.smefinanceforum.org/sites/default/files/post/files/Value%20Chain%20Finance_Qamar%20Saleem.pdf

 

 

 

Supply-chain finance: The emergence of a new competitive landscape

McKinsey

https://www.mckinsey.com/~/media/McKinsey/Industries/Financial%20Services/Our%20Insights/Supply%20chain%20finance%20The%20emergence%20of%20a%20new%20competitive%20landscape/MoP22_Supply_chain_finance_Emergence_of_a_new_competitive_landscape_2015.ashx

 

 

Fintechs and the Financial Side of Global Value Chains— The Changing Trade-Financing Environment

IMF

2017

http://www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/bop/2017/pdf/17-21.pdf

 

 

Global Supply Chain Management: Front and Center for Treasurers
Delivering Innovative Solutions that Integrate Financial and Physical Supply Chains

JP Morgan

https://www.jpmorgan.com/pdfdoc/jpmorgan/cash/pdf/global_supply_chain_front_and_center_for_treasurers

 

 

 

Supply Chain Finance

Aberdeen Group

2011

http://media.treasuryandrisk.com/treasuryandrisk/historical/whitepapers/Documents/SCF%20Gaining%20Control%200258-6833-RA-SCFinance-SP-10-NSP.pdf

 

 

 

Supply chain financing: Using cash-to-cash variables to strengthen the supply chain

Wesley S. Randall

M. Theodore Farris II

2009

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/235317652_Supply_chain_financing_Using_cash-to-cash_variables_to_strengthen_the_supply_chain

 

 

 

Supply Chain Finance: ANew Means to Support the Competitiveness and Resilience of Global Value Chains

Jean-François Lamoureux and Todd Evans

http://www.dfait-maeci.gc.ca/economist-economiste/assets/pdfs/research/TPR_2011_GVC/12_Lamoureux_and_Evans_e_FINAL.pdf

 

 

 

Maximising the value of supply chain finance

van der Vliet, K.; Reindorp, M.J.; Fransoo, J.C.

2013

https://pure.tue.nl/ws/files/3620999/387399093290135.pdf

 

 

 

The Interface of Operations and Finance in Global Supply Chains

by
Lima Zhao

2014

https://opus4.kobv.de/opus4-whu/files/179/Zhao_Lima_WHU_Diss_2014.pdf

 

 

 

Supply Chain Finance A conceptual framework to advance research

Kasper van der Vliet, Matthew J. Reindorp, Jan C. Fransoo
Beta Working Paper series 418

http://purl.tue.nl/23232338094103.pdf

 

 

COORDINATING WORKING CAPITAL MANAGEMENT MODEL IN COLLABORATIVE
SUPPLY CHAINS

A. Ivakina, N. Zenkevich

# 9 (E) – 2017

https://dspace.spbu.ru/bitstream/11701/8600/1/WP_9%28E%29-2017_Ivakina_Zenkevich.pdf

 

 

A conceptual model for supply chain finance for SMEs at operational level ‘An essay on the Supply Chain Finance paradigm ….

Jan H Jansen

2017

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Jan_Jansen11/publication/316245913_A_conceptual_model_for_supply_chain_finance_for_SMEs_at_operational_level_’An_essay_on_the_Supply_Chain_Finance_paradigm_’_Vestnik_Chelyabinsk_State_University_Version_2_18_April_2017/links/5a17d84aaca272df0808ca79/A-conceptual-model-for-supply-chain-finance-for-SMEs-at-operational-level-An-essay-on-the-Supply-Chain-Finance-paradigm-Vestnik-Chelyabinsk-State-University-Version-2-18-April-2017.pdf

 

 

Cash Flow Management and Manufacturing Firm Financial Performance: A Longitudinal Perspective

James R. Kroes

Andrew S. Manikas

http://scholarworks.boisestate.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1040&context=itscm_facpubs

 

 

 

TOWARDS INTER-ORGANIZATIONAL WORKING CAPITAL MANAGEMENT

Sari Monto

2013

https://www.doria.fi/bitstream/handle/10024/90028/isbn9789522653840.pdf?sequence=2

 

 

 

THE CYCLE TIMES OF WORKING CAPITAL: FINANCIAL VALUE CHAIN ANALYSIS METHOD

Miia Pirttilä

2014

https://www.doria.fi/bitstream/handle/10024/102180/Pirttilä_A4.pdf?sequence=2

 

 

Impact of Cash Conversion Cycle on Working Capital through Profitability: Evidence from Cement Industry of Pakistan

Afaq Ahmed Khan1, Mohsin Ayaz2, Raja Muhammad Waseem3, Sardar Osama

Bin Haseeb Abbasi4, Moazzam Ijaz

2016

http://www.iosrjournals.org/iosr-jbm/papers/Vol18-issue3/Version-2/Q1803021124131.pdf

 

 

Cash Conversion Cycle and Firms’ Profitability – A Study of Listed Manufacturing Companies of Pakistan

1Raheem Anser, 2Qaisar Ali Malik

2013

https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/d400/2a7cb44463d9b8d3b77e2b36e23466cde4ec.pdf

 

 

The Power of Supply Chain Finance

How companies can apply collaborative finance models in their supply chain to
mitigate risks and reduce costs

M. Steeman

https://www.windesheim.nl/~/media/files/windesheim/research-publications/thepowerofsupplychainfinance.pdf

 

 

Supply Chain Finance Payable and Receivable Solutions Guide

2012

JP Morgan

A Conceptual Model of Supply Chain Finance for SMEs at Operational Level

 Jan H Jansen

21 November 2017

 

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Jan_Jansen11/publication/316245913_A_conceptual_model_for_supply_chain_finance_for_SMEs_at_operational_level_’An_essay_on_the_Supply_Chain_Finance_paradigm_’_Vestnik_Chelyabinsk_State_University_Version_2_18_April_2017/links/5a17d84aaca272df0808ca79/A-conceptual-model-for-supply-chain-finance-for-SMEs-at-operational-level-An-essay-on-the-Supply-Chain-Finance-paradigm-Vestnik-Chelyabinsk-State-University-Version-2-18-April-2017.pdf

 

 

Cash-to-cash: The new supply chain management metric

M Theodore Farris II; Paul D Hutchison

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management; 2002

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Paul_Hutchison/publication/235295065_Cash-to-Cash_The_New_Supply_Chain_Management_Metric/links/02e7e5312767de88df000000.pdf

 

 

 

Integrating financial and physical supply chains: the role of banks in enabling supply chain integration

Rhian Silvestro

Paola Lustrato

2012

 

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Rhian_Silvestro/publication/263268792_Integrating_financial_and_physical_supply_chains_The_role_of_banks_in_enabling_supply_chain_integration/links/552f9c840cf21cb2faf005c0.pdf

 

 

 

Integration of Finance and Supply Chain: Emerging Frontier in Growing Economies

(A Case Study of Exporting Companies)

Muhammad Ahmar Saeed

Xiaonan Lv

 

http://www.diva-portal.org/smash/get/diva2:420165/FULLTEXT01.pdf

 

Research at the Interface of Finance, Operations, and Risk Management (iFORM): Recent Contributions and Future Directions

Volodymyr Babich

Panos Kouvelis

2017

https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3054711

 

 

 

PROCEEDINGS

Interface of Finance, Operations, and Risk Management (iFORM) SIG

2011

https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/e6e7/947ccbd42b1fe0e90f298ab96cfcef8f0448.pdf

 

 

 

Cash to Cash Cycle with a Supply Chain Perspective

Can Duman
Sawanee Sawathanon

2009

 

http://www.diva-portal.org/smash/get/diva2:221367/FULLTEXT01.pdf

 

DYNAMIC AND STATIC LIQUIDITY MEASURES IN WORKING CAPITAL STRATEGIES

Monika Bolek, PhD

 

http://eujournal.org/index.php/esj/article/viewFile/764/798

 

 

 

Does working capital management affect cost of capital?
A first empirical attempt to build up a theory for supply chain finance

Erik Hofmann, Judith Martin

2016

 

https://www.alexandria.unisg.ch/248595/1/Final%20paper_working%20capital%20management.pdf

 

 

 

Principle of Accounting System Dynamics – Modeling Corporate Financial Statements –

Kaoru Yamaguchi

 

http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.615.6514&rep=rep1&type=pdf

 

 

 

Money and Macroeconomic Dynamics

Accounting System Dynamics Approach

Edition 3.2

 

Kaoru Yamaguchi Ph.D.

Japan Futures Research Center

 

http://muratopia.org/Yamaguchi/macrodynamics/Macro%20Dynamics.pdf

 

 

 

Working Capital Management Model in value chains

Timo Eskelinen

2014

 

http://www.doria.fi/bitstream/handle/10024/96733/Working%20Capital%20Management%20Model%20in%20value%20chains_Timo%20Eskelinen.pdf?sequence=2&isAllowed=y

 

 

 

STANDARD DEFINITIONS FOR TECHNIQUES OF SUPPLY CHAIN FINANCE

Global Supply Chain Finance Forum

2016

 

https://cdn.iccwbo.org/content/uploads/sites/3/2017/01/ICC-Standard-Definitions-for-Techniques-of-Supply-Chain-Finance-Global-SCF-Forum-2016.pdf

https://baft.org/docs/default-source/current-news/download-the-scf-definitions.pdf

 

 

IMPROVING FIRM PERFORMANCE THROUGH VALUE-DRIVEN SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT: A CASH CONVERSION CYCLE APPROACH

Pan Theo Große-Ruyken
Stephan M. Wagner
Wen-Fong Lee

Baltic Management Review

Volume 3 No 1

2008

 

 

 

Best Practices in Cash Flow Management and Reporting

Hans-Dieter Scheuermann

http://www.financepractitioner.com/cash-flow-management-best-practice/best-practices-in-cash-flow-management-and-reporting?full

Financial Supply Chain Management

 

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Cash and Investments: Corporate Savings Glut in USA

Cash and Investments: Corporate Savings Glut in USA

 

Profits/Retained Earnings of a firm can be used in number of ways:

  • Capital Investments
  • Debt Repayment
  • Dividends
  • Cash and Short Term Investments
  • Long Term Investments
  • Share Buybacks
  • M&A Investments

Please see three quarterly reports from FACTSET on trends in

  • Dividents
  • Buybacks
  • Cash and Investments

Share buybacks are very common for several years.

Please see my related posts

Why do Firms buyback their Shares? Causes and Consequences.

Low Interest Rates and Business Investments : Update August 2017

Short term Thinking in Investment Decisions of Businesses and Financial Markets

Mergers and Acquisitions – Long Term Trends and Waves

Business Investments and Low Interest Rates

 

From The Corporate Saving Glut in the Aftermath of the Global Financial Crisis

cash

From Why Are Corporations Holding So Much Cash?

cash 2cash3

 

From FACTSET Cash and Investment Quarterly

cash4

Companies are holding on to the large sum of cash.  Rather than capital investments (CAPEX), cash is being used for share buybacks, dividend payouts, mergers and acquisitions, and cash investments (short and long term).

 

From FACTSET Cash and Investment Quarterly

cash5

Key Sources of Research:

 

The Corporate Saving Glut in the Aftermath of the Global Financial Crisis

Joseph W. Gruber
Steven B. Kamin

This Draft: June 2015

https://www.imf.org/external/np/seminars/eng/2015/secularstag/pdf/Gruber.pdf

 

The global corporate saving glut: Long-term evidence

Peter Chen, Loukas Karabarbounis, Brent Neiman

05 April 2017

http://voxeu.org/article/global-corporate-saving-glut

 

 

 

Declining Labor Shares and the Global Rise of Corporate Saving

Loukas Karabarbounis

Brent Neiman

October 2012

http://faculty.chicagobooth.edu/brent.neiman/research/labshare.pdf

 

The Global Rise of Corporate Saving

Peter Chen

Loukas Karabarbounis

Brent Neiman

March 2017

http://faculty.chicagobooth.edu/brent.neiman/research/CKN.pdf

http://www.nber.org/papers/w23133.pdf

 

FACTSET Dividend Quarterly

https://www.factset.com/websitefiles/PDFs/dividend

 

FACTSET Buyback Quarterly

https://www.factset.com/websitefiles/PDFs/buyback

FACTSET Cash and Investment Quarterly

https://www.factset.com/websitefiles/PDFs/cashinvestment

https://insight.factset.com/hubfs/Cash%20and%20Investment%20Quarterly/Cash%20and%20Investment%20Quarterly%20Q3%202016_12.21.16_v2.pdf

 

 

 

Why Are Corporations Holding So Much Cash?

By Juan M. Sanchez and Emircan Yurdagul

2013

 

https://www.stlouisfed.org/~/media/Files/PDFs/publications/pub_assets/pdf/re/2013/a/RE_Jan_2013.pdf

 

 

Why Do Companies Hold Cash?

Gianni La Cava and Callan Windsor

RDP 2016-03

 

https://www.rba.gov.au/publications/rdp/2016/pdf/rdp2016-03.pdf

 

 

MULTINATIONALS AND THE HIGH CASH HOLDINGS PUZZLE

Lee Pinkowitz

René M. Stulz Rohan Williamson

June 2012

 

http://www.nber.org/papers/w18120.pdf?new_window=1

 

 

 

The Determinants and Implications of Corporate Cash Holdings

Tim Opler, Lee Pinkowitz, Rene Stulz, Rohan Williamson

Issued in October 1997

http://www.nber.org/papers/w6234.pdf

 

 

WHY DO U.S. FIRMS HOLD SO MUCH MORE CASH THAN THEY USED TO?

Thomas W. Bates Kathleen M. Kahle Rene M. Stulz

September 2006

 

http://www.nber.org/papers/w12534.pdf

 

 

Why do firms hold so much cash? A tax-based explanation

C. Fritz Foley, Jay C. Hartzell, Sheridan Titman, and Garry Twite

October 2006

 

http://www.nber.org/papers/w12649.pdf

 

 

It’s Alive! Corporate Cash and Business Investment

Finn Poschmann

 

https://www.cdhowe.org/sites/default/files/attachments/research_papers/mixed/e-brief_181.pdf

 

 

Dead money

There are good reasons for hoarding cash.

John Lorinc

 

http://www.canadianbusiness.com/economy/dead-money/

 

 

IS “DEAD” MONEY ALIVE? A FIRM-LEVEL ANALYSIS OF CANADIAN NON-FINANCIAL LISTED CORPORATIONS CASH HOLDING AND CAPITAL EXPENDITURE BEHAVIOR

2014

IMF

 

https://www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/scr/2014/cr1428.pdf

Why do Firms buyback their Shares? Causes and Consequences.

Why do Firms buyback their Shares? Causes and Consequences.

 

From Stock buybacks: From retain-and reinvest to downsize-and-distribute

Since the late 1980s, in the name of “maximizing shareholder value” (MSV), U.S. corporate distributions to shareholders have exploded. Dividends are the traditional mode of providing a stream of income to shareholders who, as the name says, hold on to a company’s stock, thus supporting stock-price stability. In contrast, stock repurchases, in which a company buys back its own shares from the marketplace, thus reducing the number of outstanding shares, provide short-term boosts to a company’s stock price, thus contributing to stock-price volatility. Until the mid-1980s dividends were the overwhelmingly predominant form of distributing cash to shareholders. Since then, however, even with dividends on the rise, stock buybacks have added substantially to distributions to shareholders.

Over the decade 2004-2013, 454 companies in S&P 500 Index in March 2014 that were publicly listed over the ten years did $3.4 trillion in stock buybacks, representing 51 percent of net income. These companies expended an additional 35 percent of net income on dividends.5 And buybacks remain in vogue: According to data compiled by Factset, for the 12-month period ending December 2014, S&P 500 companies spent $565 billion on buybacks, up 18 percent from the previous 12-month period.6

Stock buybacks are an important part of the explanation for both the concentration of income among the richest households and the disappearance of middle-class employment opportunities in the United States over the past three decades.7 Over that period the resource-allocation regime at many, if not most, major U.S. business corporations has transitioned from “retain-and-reinvest” to “downsize-and-distribute.” Under retain-and-reinvest, the corporation retains earnings and reinvests them in the productive capabilities embodied in its labor force. Under downsize-and-distribute, the corporation lays off experienced, and often more expensive, workers, and distributes corporate cash to shareholders.8 My research suggests that, with its downsize-and-distribute resource-allocation regime, the “buyback corporation” is in large part responsible for a national economy characterized by income inequity, employment instability, and diminished innovative capability – or the opposite of what I have called “sustainable prosperity.”9

 

 From Buyback Quarterly – Factset/December 2016

buyback2

 

From Stock buybacks: From retain-and reinvest to downsize-and-distribute

buyback

Profits Without Prosperity

 

Five years after the official end of the Great Recession, corporate profits are high, and the stock market is booming. Yet most Americans are not sharing in the recovery. While the top 0.1% of income recipients—which include most of the highest-ranking corporate executives—reap almost all the income gains, good jobs keep disappearing, and new employment opportunities tend to be insecure and underpaid. Corporate profitability is not translating into widespread economic prosperity.

The allocation of corporate profits to stock buybacks deserves much of the blame. Consider the 449 companies in the S&P 500 index that were publicly listed from 2003 through 2012. During that period those companies used 54% of their earnings—a total of $2.4 trillion—to buy back their own stock, almost all through purchases on the open market. Dividends absorbed an additional 37% of their earnings. That left very little for investments in productive capabilities or higher incomes for employees.

The buyback wave has gotten so big, in fact, that even shareholders—the presumed beneficiaries of all this corporate largesse—are getting worried. “It concerns us that, in the wake of the financial crisis, many companies have shied away from investing in the future growth of their companies,” Laurence Fink, the chairman and CEO of BlackRock, the world’s largest asset manager, wrote in an open letter to corporate America in March. “Too many companies have cut capital expenditure and even increased debt to boost dividends and increase share buybacks.”

Why are such massive resources being devoted to stock repurchases? Corporate executives give several reasons, which I will discuss later. But none of them has close to the explanatory power of this simple truth: Stock-based instruments make up the majority of their pay, and in the short term buybacks drive up stock prices. In 2012 the 500 highest-paid executives named in proxy statements of U.S. public companies received, on average, $30.3 million each; 42% of their compensation came from stock options and 41% from stock awards. By increasing the demand for a company’s shares, open-market buybacks automatically lift its stock price, even if only temporarily, and can enable the company to hit quarterly earnings per share (EPS) targets.

As a result, the very people we rely on to make investments in the productive capabilities that will increase our shared prosperity are instead devoting most of their companies’ profits to uses that will increase their own prosperity—with unsurprising results. Even when adjusted for inflation, the compensation of top U.S. executives has doubled or tripled since the first half of the 1990s, when it was already widely viewed as excessive. Meanwhile, overall U.S. economic performance has faltered.

If the U.S. is to achieve growth that distributes income equitably and provides stable employment, government and business leaders must take steps to bring both stock buybacks and executive pay under control. The nation’s economic health depends on it.

From Value Creation to Value Extraction

For three decades I’ve been studying how the resource allocation decisions of major U.S. corporations influence the relationship between value creation and value extraction, and how that relationship affects the U.S. economy. From the end of World War II until the late 1970s, a retain-and-reinvest approach to resource allocation prevailed at major U.S. corporations. They retained earnings and reinvested them in increasing their capabilities, first and foremost in the employees who helped make firms more competitive. They provided workers with higher incomes and greater job security, thus contributing to equitable, stable economic growth—what I call “sustainable prosperity.”

This pattern began to break down in the late 1970s, giving way to a downsize-and-distribute regime of reducing costs and then distributing the freed-up cash to financial interests, particularly shareholders. By favoring value extraction over value creation, this approach has contributed to employment instability and income inequality.

As documented by the economists Thomas Piketty and Emmanuel Saez, the richest 0.1% of U.S. households collected a record 12.3% of all U.S. income in 2007, surpassing their 11.5% share in 1928, on the eve of the Great Depression. In the financial crisis of 2008–2009, their share fell sharply, but it has since rebounded, hitting 11.3% in 2012.

Since the late 1980s, the largest component of the income of the top 0.1% has been compensation, driven by stock-based pay. Meanwhile, the growth of workers’ wages has been slow and sporadic, except during the internet boom of 1998–2000, the only time in the past 46 years when real wages rose by 2% or more for three years running. Since the late 1970s, average growth in real wages has increasingly lagged productivity growth. (See the exhibit “When Productivity and Wages Parted Ways.”)

When Productivity and Wages Parted Ways

From 1948 to the mid-1970s, increases in productivity and wages went hand in hand. Then a gap opened between the two.

Not coincidentally, U.S. employment relations have undergone a transformation in the past three decades. Mass plant closings eliminated millions of unionized blue-collar jobs. The norm of a white-collar worker’s spending his or her entire career with one company disappeared. And the seismic shift toward offshoring left all members of the U.S. labor force—even those with advanced education and substantial work experience—vulnerable to displacement.

To some extent these structural changes could be justified initially as necessary responses to changes in technology and competition. In the early 1980s permanent plant closings were triggered by the inroads superior Japanese manufacturers had made in consumer-durable and capital-goods industries. In the early 1990s one-company careers fell by the wayside in the IT sector because the open-systems architecture of the microelectronics revolution devalued the skills of older employees versed in proprietary technologies. And in the early 2000s the offshoring of more-routine tasks, such as writing unsophisticated software and manning customer call centers, sped up as a capable labor force emerged in low-wage developing economies and communications costs plunged, allowing U.S. companies to focus their domestic employees on higher-value-added work.

These practices chipped away at the loyalty and dampened the spending power of American workers, and often gave away key competitive capabilities of U.S. companies. Attracted by the quick financial gains they produced, many executives ignored the long-term effects and kept pursuing them well past the time they could be justified.

A turning point was the wave of hostile takeovers that swept the country in the 1980s. Corporate raiders often claimed that the complacent leaders of the targeted companies were failing to maximize returns to shareholders. That criticism prompted boards of directors to try to align the interests of management and shareholders by making stock-based pay a much bigger component of executive compensation.

Given incentives to maximize shareholder value and meet Wall Street’s expectations for ever higher quarterly EPS, top executives turned to massive stock repurchases, which helped them “manage” stock prices. The result: Trillions of dollars that could have been spent on innovation and job creation in the U.S. economy over the past three decades have instead been used to buy back shares for what is effectively stock-price manipulation.

Good Buybacks and Bad

Not all buybacks undermine shared prosperity. There are two major types: tender offers and open-market repurchases. With the former, a company contacts shareholders and offers to buy back their shares at a stipulated price by a certain near-term date, and then shareholders who find the price agreeable tender their shares to the company. Tender offers can be a way for executives who have substantial ownership stakes and care about a company’s long-term competitiveness to take advantage of a low stock price and concentrate ownership in their own hands. This can, among other things, free them from Wall Street’s pressure to maximize short-term profits and allow them to invest in the business. Henry Singleton was known for using tender offers in this way at Teledyne in the 1970s, and Warren Buffett for using them at GEICO in the 1980s. (GEICO became wholly owned by Buffett’s holding company, Berkshire Hathaway, in 1996.) As Buffett has noted, this kind of tender offer should be made when the share price is below the intrinsic value of the productive capabilities of the company and the company is profitable enough to repurchase the shares without impeding its real investment plans.

But tender offers constitute only a small portion of modern buybacks. Most are now done on the open market, and my research shows that they often come at the expense of investment in productive capabilities and, consequently, aren’t great for long-term shareholders.

Companies have been allowed to repurchase their shares on the open market with virtually no regulatory limits since 1982, when the SEC instituted Rule 10b-18 of the Securities Exchange Act. Under the rule, a corporation’s board of directors can authorize senior executives to repurchase up to a certain dollar amount of stock over a specified or open-ended period of time, and the company must publicly announce the buyback program. After that, management can buy a large number of the company’s shares on any given business day without fear that the SEC will charge it with stock-price manipulation—provided, among other things, that the amount does not exceed a “safe harbor” of 25% of the previous four weeks’ average daily trading volume. The SEC requires companies to report total quarterly repurchases but not daily ones, meaning that it cannot determine whether a company has breached the 25% limit without a special investigation.

Despite the escalation in buybacks over the past three decades, the SEC has only rarely launched proceedings against a company for using them to manipulate its stock price. And even within the 25% limit, companies can still make huge purchases: Exxon Mobil, by far the biggest stock repurchaser from 2003 to 2012, can buy back about $300 million worth of shares a day, and Apple up to $1.5 billion a day. In essence, Rule 10b-18 legalized stock market manipulation through open-market repurchases.

The rule was a major departure from the agency’s original mandate, laid out in the Securities Exchange Act in 1934. The act was a reaction to a host of unscrupulous activities that had fueled speculation in the Roaring ’20s, leading to the stock market crash of 1929 and the Great Depression. To prevent such shenanigans, the act gave the SEC broad powers to issue rules and regulations.

During the Reagan years, the SEC began to roll back those rules. The commission’s chairman from 1981 to 1987 was John Shad, a former vice chairman of E.F. Hutton and the first Wall Street insider to lead the commission in 50 years. He believed that the deregulation of securities markets would channel savings into economic investments more efficiently and that the isolated cases of fraud and manipulation that might go undetected did not justify onerous disclosure requirements for companies. The SEC’s adoption of Rule 10b-18 reflected that point of view.

Debunking the Justifications for Buybacks

Executives give three main justifications for open-market repurchases. Let’s examine them one by one:

1. Buybacks are investments in our undervalued shares that signal our confidence in the company’s future.

This makes some sense. But the reality is that over the past two decades major U.S. companies have tended to do buybacks in bull markets and cut back on them, often sharply, in bear markets. (See the exhibit “Where Did the Money from Productivity Increases Go?”) They buy high and, if they sell at all, sell low. Research by the Academic-Industry Research Network, a nonprofit I cofounded and lead, shows that companies that do buybacks never resell the shares at higher prices.

Where Did the Money from Productivity Increases Go?

Buybacks—as well as dividends—have skyrocketed in the past 20 years. (Note that these data are for the 251 companies that were in the S&P 500 in January 2013 and were public from 1981 through 2012. Inclusion of firms that went public after 1981, such as Microsoft, Cisco, Amgen, Oracle, and Dell, would make the increase in buybacks even more marked.) Though executives say they repurchase only undervalued stocks, buybacks increased when the stock market boomed, casting doubt on that claim.

Source: Standard & Poor’s Compustat database; the Academic-Industry Research Network.
Note: Mean repurchase and dividend amounts are in 2012 dollars.

 

Once in a while a company that bought high in a boom has been forced to sell low in a bust to alleviate financial distress. GE, for example, spent $3.2 billion on buybacks in the first three quarters of 2008, paying an average price of $31.84 per share. Then, in the last quarter, as the financial crisis brought about losses at GE Capital, the company did a $12 billion stock issue at an average share price of $22.25, in a failed attempt to protect its triple-A credit rating.

In general, when a company buys back shares at what turn out to be high prices, it eventually reduces the value of the stock held by continuing shareholders. “The continuing shareholder is penalized by repurchases above intrinsic value,” Warren Buffett wrote in his 1999 letter to Berkshire Hathaway shareholders. “Buying dollar bills for $1.10 is not good business for those who stick around.”

2. Buybacks are necessary to offset the dilution of earnings per share when employees exercise stock options.

Calculations that I have done for high-tech companies with broad-based stock option programs reveal that the volume of open-market repurchases is generally a multiple of the volume of options that employees exercise. In any case, there’s no logical economic rationale for doing repurchases to offset dilution from the exercise of employee stock options. Options are meant to motivate employees to work harder now to produce higher future returns for the company. Therefore, rather than using corporate cash to boost EPS immediately, executives should be willing to wait for the incentive to work. If the company generates higher earnings, employees can exercise their options at higher stock prices, and the company can allocate the increased earnings to investment in the next round of innovation.

3. Our company is mature and has run out of profitable investment opportunities; therefore, we should return its unneeded cash to shareholders.

Some people used to argue that buybacks were a more tax-efficient means of distributing money to shareholders than dividends. But that has not been the case since 2003, when the tax rates on long-term capital gains and qualified dividends were made the same. Much more important issues remain, however: What is the CEO’s main role and his or her responsibility to shareholders?

Companies that have built up productive capabilities over long periods typically have huge organizational and financial advantages when they enter related markets. One of the chief functions of top executives is to discover new opportunities for those capabilities. When they opt to do large open-market repurchases instead, it raises the question of whether these executives are doing their jobs.

A related issue is the notion that the CEO’s main obligation is to shareholders. It’s based on a misconception of the shareholders’ role in the modern corporation. The philosophical justification for giving them all excess corporate profits is that they are best positioned to allocate resources because they have the most interest in ensuring that capital generates the highest returns. This proposition is central to the “maximizing shareholder value” (MSV) arguments espoused over the years, most notably by Michael C. Jensen. The MSV school also posits that companies’ so-called free cash flow should be distributed to shareholders because only they make investments without a guaranteed return—and hence bear risk.

Why Money for Reinvestment Has Dried Up

Since the early 1980s, when restrictions on open-market buybacks were greatly eased, distributions to shareholders have absorbed a huge portion of net income, leaving much less for reinvestment in companies.

Note: Data are for the 251 companies that were in the S&P 500 Index in January 2013 and were publicly listed from 1981 through 2012. If the companies that went public after 1981, such as Microsoft, Cisco, Amgen, Oracle, and Dell, were included, repurchases as a percentage of net income would be even higher.

But the MSV school ignores other participants in the economy who bear risk by investing without a guaranteed return. Taxpayers take on such risk through government agencies that invest in infrastructure and knowledge creation. And workers take it on by investing in the development of their capabilities at the firms that employ them. As risk bearers, taxpayers, whose dollars support business enterprises, and workers, whose efforts generate productivity improvements, have claims on profits that are at least as strong as the shareholders’.

The irony of MSV is that public-company shareholders typically never invest in the value-creating capabilities of the company at all. Rather, they invest in outstanding shares in the hope that the stock price will rise. And a prime way in which corporate executives fuel that hope is by doing buybacks to manipulate the market. The only money that Apple ever raised from public shareholders was $97 million at its IPO in 1980. Yet in recent years, hedge fund activists such as David Einhorn and Carl Icahn—who played absolutely no role in the company’s success over the decades—have purchased large amounts of Apple stock and then pressured the company to announce some of the largest buyback programs in history.

The past decade’s huge increase in repurchases, in addition to high levels of dividends, have come at a time when U.S. industrial companies face new competitive challenges. This raises questions about how much of corporate cash flow is really “free” to be distributed to shareholders. Many academics—for example, Gary P. Pisano and Willy C. Shih of Harvard Business School, in their 2009 HBR article “Restoring American Competitiveness” and their book Producing Prosperity—have warned that if U.S. companies don’t start investing much more in research and manufacturing capabilities, they cannot expect to remain competitive in a range of advanced technology industries.

Retained earnings have always been the foundation for investments in innovation. Executives who subscribe to MSV are thus copping out of their responsibility to invest broadly and deeply in the productive capabilities their organizations need to continually innovate. MSV as commonly understood is a theory of value extraction, not value creation.

Executives Are Serving Their Own Interests

As I noted earlier, there is a simple, much more plausible explanation for the increase in open-market repurchases: the rise of stock-based pay. Combined with pressure from Wall Street, stock-based incentives make senior executives extremely motivated to do buybacks on a colossal and systemic scale.

Consider the 10 largest repurchasers, which spent a combined $859 billion on buybacks, an amount equal to 68% of their combined net income, from 2003 through 2012. (See the exhibit “The Top 10 Stock Repurchasers.”) During the same decade, their CEOs received, on average, a total of $168 million each in compensation. On average, 34% of their compensation was in the form of stock options and 24% in stock awards. At these companies the next four highest-paid senior executives each received, on average, $77 million in compensation during the 10 years—27% of it in stock options and 29% in stock awards. Yet since 2003 only three of the 10 largest repurchasers—Exxon Mobil, IBM, and Procter & Gamble—have outperformed the S&P 500 Index.

The Top 10 Stock Repurchasers 2003–2012

At most of the leading U.S. companies below, distributions to shareholders were well in excess of net income. These distributions came at great cost to innovation, employment, and—in cases such as oil refining and pharmaceuticals—customers who had to pay higher prices for products.

Sources: Standard & Poor’s Compustat database; Standard & Poor’s Execucomp database; the Academic-Industry Research Network.
Note: The percentages of stock-based pay include gains realized from exercising stock options for all years plus, for 2003–2005, the fair value of restricted stock grants or, for 2006–2012, gains realized on vesting of stock awards. Rounding to the nearest billion may affect total distributions and percentages of net income. *Steven Ballmer, Microsoft’s CEO from January 2000 to February 2014, did not receive any stock-based pay. He does, however, own about 4% of Microsoft’s shares, valued at more than $13 billion.

Reforming the System

Buybacks have become an unhealthy corporate obsession. Shifting corporations back to a retain-and-reinvest regime that promotes stable and equitable growth will take bold action. Here are three proposals:

Put an end to open-market buybacks.

In a 2003 update to Rule 10b-18, the SEC explained: “It is not appropriate for the safe harbor to be available when the issuer has a heightened incentive to manipulate its share price.” In practice, though, the stock-based pay of the executives who decide to do repurchases provides just this “heightened incentive.” To correct this glaring problem, the SEC should rescind the safe harbor.

A good first step toward that goal would be an extensive SEC study of the possible damage that open-market repurchases have done to capital formation, industrial corporations, and the U.S. economy over the past three decades. For example, during that period the amount of stock taken out of the market has exceeded the amount issued in almost every year; from 2004 through 2013 this net withdrawal averaged $316 billion a year. In aggregate, the stock market is not functioning as a source of funds for corporate investment. As I’ve already noted, retained earnings have always provided the base for such investment. I believe that the practice of tying executive compensation to stock price is undermining the formation of physical and human capital.

Rein in stock-based pay.

Many studies have shown that large companies tend to use the same set of consultants to benchmark executive compensation, and that each consultant recommends that the client pay its CEO well above average. As a result, compensation inevitably ratchets up over time. The studies also show that even declines in stock price increase executive pay: When a company’s stock price falls, the board stuffs even more options and stock awards into top executives’ packages, claiming that it must ensure that they won’t jump ship and will do whatever is necessary to get the stock price back up.

In 1991 the SEC began allowing top executives to keep the gains from immediately selling stock acquired from options. Previously, they had to hold the stock for six months or give up any “short-swing” gains. That decision has only served to reinforce top executives’ overriding personal interest in boosting stock prices. And because corporations aren’t required to disclose daily buyback activity, it gives executives the opportunity to trade, undetected, on inside information about when buybacks are being done. At the very least, the SEC should stop allowing executives to sell stock immediately after options are exercised. Such a rule could help launch a much-needed discussion of meaningful reform that goes beyond the 2010 Dodd-Frank Act’s “Say on Pay”—an ineffectual law that gives shareholders the right to make nonbinding recommendations to the board on compensation issues.

But overall the use of stock-based pay should be severely limited. Incentive compensation should be subject to performance criteria that reflect investment in innovative capabilities, not stock performance.

Transform the boards that determine executive compensation.

Boards are currently dominated by other CEOs, who have a strong bias toward ratifying higher pay packages for their peers. When approving enormous distributions to shareholders and stock-based pay for top executives, these directors believe they’re acting in the interests of shareholders.

That’s a big part of the problem. The vast majority of shareholders are simply investors in outstanding shares who can easily sell their stock when they want to lock in gains or minimize losses. As I argued earlier, the people who truly invest in the productive capabilities of corporations are taxpayers and workers. Taxpayers have an interest in whether a corporation that uses government investments can generate profits that allow it to pay taxes, which constitute the taxpayers’ returns on those investments. Workers have an interest in whether the company will be able to generate profits with which it can provide pay increases and stable career opportunities.

It’s time for the U.S. corporate governance system to enter the 21st century: Taxpayers and workers should have seats on boards. Their representatives would have the insights and incentives to ensure that executives allocate resources to investments in capabilities most likely to generate innovations and value.

Courage in Washington

After the Harvard Law School dean Erwin Griswold published “Are Stock Options Getting out of Hand?” in this magazine in 1960, Senator Albert Gore launched a campaign that persuaded Congress to whittle away special tax advantages for executive stock options. After the Tax Reform Act of 1976, the compensation expert Graef Crystal declared that stock options that qualified for the capital-gains tax rate, “once the most popular of all executive compensation devices…have been given the last rites by Congress.” It also happens that during the 1970s the share of all U.S. income that the top 0.1% of households got was at its lowest point in the past century.

The members of the U.S. Congress should show the courage and independence of their predecessors and go beyond “Say on Pay” to do something about excessive executive compensation. In addition, Congress should fix a broken tax regime that frequently rewards value extractors as if they were value creators and ignores the critical role of government investment in the infrastructure and knowledge that are so crucial to the competitiveness of U.S. business.

Instead, what we have now are corporations that lobby—often successfully—for federal subsidies for research, development, and exploration, while devoting far greater resources to stock buybacks. Here are three examples of such hypocrisy:

Alternative energy.

Exxon Mobil, while receiving about $600 million a year in U.S. government subsidies for oil exploration (according to the Center for American Progress), spends about $21 billion a year on buybacks. It spends virtually no money on alternative energy research.

Meanwhile, through the American Energy Innovation Council, top executives of Microsoft, GE, and other companies have lobbied the U.S. government to triple its investment in alternative energy research and subsidies, to $16 billion a year. Yet these companies had plenty of funds they could have invested in alternative energy on their own. Over the past decade Microsoft and GE, combined, have spent about that amount annually on buybacks.

Nanotechnology.

Intel executives have long lobbied the U.S. government to increase spending on nanotechnology research. In 2005, Intel’s then-CEO, Craig R. Barrett, argued that “it will take a massive, coordinated U.S. research effort involving academia, industry, and state and federal governments to ensure that America continues to be the world leader in information technology.” Yet from 2001, when the U.S. government launched the National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI), through 2013 Intel’s expenditures on buybacks were almost four times the total NNI budget.

Pharmaceutical drugs.

In response to complaints that U.S. drug prices are at least twice those in any other country, Pfizer and other U.S. pharmaceutical companies have argued that the profits from these high prices—enabled by a generous intellectual-property regime and lax price regulation—permit more R&D to be done in the United States than elsewhere. Yet from 2003 through 2012, Pfizer funneled an amount equal to 71% of its profits into buybacks, and an amount equal to 75% of its profits into dividends. In other words, it spent more on buybacks and dividends than it earned and tapped its capital reserves to help fund them. The reality is, Americans pay high drug prices so that major pharmaceutical companies can boost their stock prices and pad executive pay.Given the importance of the stock market and corporations to the economy and society, U.S. regulators must step in to check the behavior of those who are unable or unwilling to control themselves. “The mission of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission,” the SEC’s website explains, “is to protect investors, maintain fair, orderly, and efficient markets, and facilitate capital formation.” Yet, as we have seen, in its rulings on and monitoring of stock buybacks and executive pay over three decades, the SEC has taken a course of action contrary to those objectives. It has enabled the wealthiest 0.1% of society, including top executives, to capture the lion’s share of the gains of U.S. productivity growth while the vast majority of Americans have been left behind. Rule 10b-18, in particular, has facilitated a rigged stock market that, by permitting the massive distribution of corporate cash to shareholders, has undermined capital formation, including human capital formation.

The corporate resource allocation process is America’s source of economic security or insecurity, as the case may be. If Americans want an economy in which corporate profits result in shared prosperity, the buyback and executive compensation binges will have to end. As with any addiction, there will be withdrawal pains. But the best executives may actually get satisfaction out of being paid a reasonable salary for allocating resources in ways that sustain the enterprise, provide higher standards of living to the workers who make it succeed, and generate tax revenues for the governments that provide it with crucial inputs.

A version of this article appeared in the September 2014 issue of Harvard Business Review.

Key Sources of Research:

Buybacks Around the World
Market Timing, Governance and Regulation

Alberto Manconi Urs Peyer Theo Vermaelen
September 2015

https://knowledge.insead.edu/sites/www.insead.edu/files/images/1bb_around_the_world_revised_-_september_8_2015-2.pdf

 

 

EXPLOITING EXCESS RETURNS FROM SHARE BUYBACK ANNOUNCEMENTS

White Paper by Catalyst Capital Advisors

http://www.catalystmutualfunds.com/i/u/6149790/f/Catalyst_Buyback_Strategy_White_Paper_2013-12-31.pdf

 

 

BUYBACKS: FROM BASICS TO POLITICS

WILLIAM LAZONICK
The Academic-Industry Research Network

August 19, 2015

http://www.theairnet.org/v3/backbone/uploads/2015/08/Lazonick-Buybacks-Basics-to-Politics-20150819.pdf

 

Investment Opportunities and Share Repurchases

Walter I. Boudry*
Jarl G. Kallberg
Crocker H. Liu

Current Version: 08 September 2009

http://scholarship.sha.cornell.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1503&context=articles

 

The savvy executive’s guide to buying back shares

By Bin Jiang and Tim Koller
Mckinsey
2011

https://www.mckinsey.com/business-functions/strategy-and-corporate-finance/our-insights/the-savvy-executives-guide-to-buying-back-shares

 

 

The Real Effects of Share Repurchases

Heitor Almeida, Vyacheslav Fos, and Mathias Kronlund
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

October 22, 2014

https://business.illinois.edu/halmeida/repo.pdf

 

Buybacks and the board: Director perspectives on the share repurchase revolution

Richard Fields, Tapestry Networks
August 2016

https://irrcinstitute.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/FINAL-Buybacks-Report-Aug-22-2016.pdf

 

 

 

The Cannibalized Company Part 2

How the cult of shareholder value has reshaped corporate America

By Karen Brettell, David Gaffen and David Rohde

http://www.reuters.com/investigates/special-report/usa-buybacks-pay/

 

 

The Cannibalized Company Part 1

How the cult of shareholder value has reshaped corporate America

By Karen Brettell, David Gaffen and David Rohde

http://www.reuters.com/investigates/special-report/usa-buybacks-cannibalized/

 

 

Corporate Buybacks and Capital Investment: An International Perspective

Joseph W. Gruber and Steven B. Kamin

20017

https://www.federalreserve.gov/econres/notes/ifdp-notes/corporate-buybacks-and-capital-investment-an-international-perspective-20170411.htm

 

 

The Case for Stock Buybacks

SEPTEMBER 15, 2017

https://hbr.org/2017/09/the-case-for-stock-buybacks

 

 

Profits Without Prosperity

FROM THE SEPTEMBER 2014 ISSUE

https://hbr.org/2014/09/profits-without-prosperity

 

 

Stock buybacks: From retain-and- reinvest to downsize-and-distribute

By William Lazonick

2015

 

https://www.brookings.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/lazonick.pdf

Stock Market Indicators: S&P 500 Buybacks & Dividends

 

https://www.yardeni.com/pub/buybackdiv.pdf

 

 

 

 Buyback Quarterly

FACTSET
20016

https://insight.factset.com/hubfs/Buyback%20Quarterly/Buyback%20Quarterly%20Q3%202016_12.19.pdf

https://www.factset.com/websitefiles/PDFs/buyback

 

The Ugly Truth Behind Stock Buybacks

https://www.forbes.com/sites/aalsin/2017/02/28/shareholders-should-be-required-to-vote-on-stock-buybacks/#13b556ce6b1e

Low Interest Rates and Business Investments : Update August 2017

Low Interest Rates and Business Investments : Update August 2017

 

From  Explaining Low Investment Spending

USINVEST

globalinvest

 

Please see my earlier posts.

Business Investments and Low Interest Rates

Mergers and Acquisitions – Long Term Trends and Waves

The Decline in Long Term Real Interest Rates

Short term Thinking in Investment Decisions of Businesses and Financial Markets

Low Interest Rates and Monetary Policy Effectiveness

Low Interest Rates and Banks’ Profitability : Update July 2017

Low Interest Rates and Banks Profitability: Update – December 2016

 

Since my earlier posts on this subject there has been several new studies published highlighting weakness in business investments as one of the cause of slower economic growth and lower interest rates.

Other significant factors impacting interest rates are demographic changes, and slower economic growth.

I argue that there is mutual (circular) causality in weak business investment, slower economic growth, and lower interest rates which reinforce each other.

 

Decreased competition, increased concentration, corporate savings glut, share buybacks, paying dividends are also identified as factors.

Number of public companies have decreased significantly in USA since 1996 due to M&A activity.   See the data below.

Increased Mergers/Acquisitions, Increased Concentration, Decreased Competition, Decreased Number of Public Companies, Share buybacks, and Dividend Payouts are multiple perspectives of same problem.

 

From The Incredible Shrinking Universe of Stocks

The Causes and Consequences of Fewer U.S. Equities

USNUMUSSTAT

 

Key sources of Research:

The Low Level of Global Real Interest Rates

Remarks by
Stanley Fischer
Vice Chairman
Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System

at the
Conference to Celebrate Arminio Fraga’s 60 Years
Casa das Garcas, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

July 31, 2017

The Low Level of Global Real Interest Rates

 

 

INVESTMENT-LESS GROWTH: AN EMPIRICAL INVESTIGATION

German Gutierrez Thomas Philippon

Working Paper 22897

NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138

December 2016

 

INVESTMENT-LESS GROWTH: AN EMPIRICAL INVESTIGATION

 

 

Explaining Low Investment Spending

The NBER Digest
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

February 2017

Explaining Low Investment Spending

 

 

The Secular Stagnation of Investment?

Callum Jones and Thomas Philippon

December 2016

 

The Secular Stagnation of Investment?

 

 

Is there an investment gap in advanced economies? If so, why?

By Robin Dottling, German Gutierrez and Thomas Philippon

 

Is there an investment gap in advanced economies? If so, why?

 

 

The Disappointing Recovery of Output after 2009

JOHN G. FERNALD ROBERT E. HALL

JAMES H. STOCK MARK W. WATSON

May 2, 2017

The Disappointing Recovery of Output after 2009

 

 

Declining Competition and Investment in the U.S.

German Gutierrez and Thomas Philippon

NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

July 2017

 

Declining Competition and Investment in the U.S

 

 

Real Interest Rates Over the Long Run : Decline and convergence since the 1980s

Kei-Mu Yi   Jing Zhang

ECONOMIC POLICY PAPER 16-10 SEPTEMBER 2016

FEDERAL RESERVE BANK of MINNEAPOLIS

Real Interest Rates over the Long Run Decline and convergence since the 1980s, due significantly to factors causing lower investment demand

 

 

Understanding global trends in long-run real interest rates

Kei-Mu Yi and Jing Zhang

Economic Perspectives, Vol. 41, No. 2, 2017
Chicago Fed Reserve Bank

 

Understanding Global Trends in Long-run Real Interest Rates

 

 

Weakness in Investment Growth: Causes, Implications and Policy Responses

CAMA Working Paper 19/2017 March 2017

M. Ayhan Kose

Franziska Ohnsorge

Lei Sandy Ye

Ergys Islamaj

 

Weakness in Investment Growth: Causes, Implications and Policy Responses

 

 

Are US Industries Becoming More Concentrated?

Gustavo Grullon, Yelena Larkin and Roni Michaely

October 2016

 

Are US Industries Becoming More Concentrated?

 

 

Why Is Global Business Investment So Weak? Some Insights from Advanced Economies

 

Robert Fay, Justin-Damien Guénette, Martin Leduc and Louis Morel,

International Economic Analysis Department

Bank of Canada Review Spring 2017

 

Why Is Global Business Investment So Weak? Some Insights from Advanced Economies

 

 

What Is Behind the Weakness in Global Investment?

by Maxime Leboeuf and Bob Fay

2016

Bank of Canada

 

What Is Behind the Weakness in Global Investment?

 A Structural Interpretation of the Recent Weakness in Business Investment

by Russell Barnett and Rhys Mendes

 The Corporate Saving Glut in the Aftermath of the Global Financial Crisis

 

Gruber, Joseph W., and Steven B. Kamin

International Finance Discussion Papers
Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System
Number 1150 October 2015

 

The Corporate Saving Glut in the Aftermath of the Global Financial Crisis

 

 

The Incredible Shrinking Universe of Stocks

The Causes and Consequences of Fewer U.S. Equities

March 22, 2017

GLOBAL FINANCIAL STRATEGIES

http://www.credit-suisse.com

 

The Incredible Shrinking Universe of Stocks The Causes and Consequences of Fewer U.S. Equities

 

 

They Just Get Bigger: How Corporate Mergers Strangle the Economy

Jordan Brennan

2017 February 19

They Just Get Bigger: How Corporate Mergers Strangle the Economy

 

 

Rising Corporate Concentration, Declining Trade Union Power, and the Growing Income Gap: American Prosperity in Historical Perspective

Jordan Brennan

March 2016

 

Rising Corporate Concentration, Declining Trade Union Power, and the Growing Income Gap: American Prosperity in Historical Perspective

 

 

The Oligarchy Economy: Concentrated Power, Income Inequality, and Slow Growth

Corporate concentration exacerbates income inequality

 

Jordan Brennan

March 2016

http://evonomics.com/the-oligarchy-economy/

Low Interest Rates and Monetary Policy Effectiveness

Low Interest Rates and Monetary Policy Effectiveness

 

World economy is stuck in low interest rates environment.   Euro area, japan have even negative interest rates.  US Fed Reserve since December 2016 has started raising interest rates.

Attempts by Central Banks have not been effective in increasing economic growth.  Many Economists now are presenting counter intuitive reasons for low growth.

 

Please see my earlier related posts.

Business Investments and Low Interest Rates

Mergers and Acquisitions – Long Term Trends and Waves

 

Since 2016, there are several new studies published exploring effectiveness of monetary policy in low interest rates environment.

 

Is monetary policy less effective when interest rates are persistently low?

by Claudio Borio and Boris Hofmann

April 2017

Is Monetary Policy Less Effective When Interest Rates are Persistently Low?

 

In March 2017, Brookings Institution published the following study by the economists of the US Federal Reserve.

Monetary policy in a low interest rate world

 

Fed Reserve of Chicago published speech given by Charles Evans in 2016.

Monetary Policy in a Lower Interest Rate Environment

 

Lecture by Vítor Constâncio, Vice-President of the ECB, Macroeconomics Symposium at Utrecht School of Economics, 15 June 2016

The challenge of low real interest rates for monetary policy

 

Journal of Policy Modeling published a paper by Ken Rogoff.  Paper was presented at American Economic Association, 2017.

Monetary policy in a low interest rate world

 

Eight BIS CCA Research Conference on “Low interest rates, monetary policy and international spillovers”, hosted by the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, Washington DC, 25-26 May 2017

Low interest rates, monetary policy and international spillovers

 

Economist Magazine published an article on views of Bill Gross and others.

November 2015

Do ultra-low interest rates really damage growth?

 

Bloomberg Business Week published an article describing views of Charles Calomiris and others.

June 2017

Is the World Overdoing Low Interest Rates?

 

Claudio Borio and Boris Hofmann

The Paper was prepared for the Reserve Bank of Australia conference
“Monetary Policy and Financial Stability in a World of Low Interest Rates”,

16-17 March 2017, Sydney

Is monetary policy less effective when interest rates are persistently low?

 

Monetary policy and bank lending in a low interest rate environment: diminishing effectiveness?

Claudio Borio and Leonardo Gambacorta

February 2017

Monetary policy and bank lending in a low interest rate environment: diminishing effectiveness?

 

Negative Interest Rate Policy (NIRP):
Implications for Monetary Transmission and Bank Profitability in the Euro Area

Prepared by Andreas (Andy) Jobst and Huidan Lin

IMF

August 2016

Negative Interest Rate Policy (NIRP): Implications for Monetary Transmission and Bank Profitability in the Euro Area

 

James Bullard, President and CEO of Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

March 24, 2009

The Henry Thornton Lecture, Cass Business School, London

Effective Monetary Policy in a Low Interest Rate Environment

 

Federal Reserve Bank of New York

Monetary Policy, Financial Conditions, and Financial Stability

Tobias Adrian
Nellie Liang

Monetary Policy, Financial Conditions, and Financial Stability

 

Monetary policy, the financial cycle and ultra-low interest rates

Mikael Juselius of Bank of Finland

DNB Workshop on “Estimating and Interpreting Financial Cycles”

Amsterdam, 2 September 2016

Monetary policy, the financial cycle and ultra-low interest rates

BIS Paper

Monetary policy, the financial cycle and ultra-low interest rates

 

The dynamics of real interest rates, monetary policy and its limits

Philippe d’Arvisenet

May 2016

The dynamics of real interest rates, monetary policy and its limits

 

Output Gaps and Monetary Policy at Low Interest Rates

By Roberto M. Billi

Output Gaps and Monetary Policy at Low Interest Rates

 

The insensitivity of investment to interest rates: Evidence from a survey of CFOs

Steve A. Sharpe and Gustavo A. Suarez

2014-02

The insensitivity of investment to interest rates: Evidence from a survey of CFOs

 

Does Prolonged Monetary Policy Easing Increase Financial Vulnerability?

Prepared by Stephen Cecchetti, Tommaso Mancini-Griffoli, and Machiko Narita

February 2017

Does Prolonged Monetary Policy Easing Increase Financial Vulnerability?

 

The Microeconomic Perils of Monetary Policy Experiments

Charles W. Calomiris

Cato Institute

The Microeconomic Perils of Monetary Policy Experiments

 

Why Have the Fed’s Policies Failed to Stimulate the Economy?

Mickey D. Levy

Cato Institute

Why Have the Fed’s Policies Failed to Stimulate the Economy?

Low Interest Rates and Banks’ Profitability : Update July 2017

Low Interest Rates and Banks’ Profitability : Update July 2017

 

Please see my previous posts.

Impact of Low Interest Rates on Bank’s Profitability

Low Interest Rates and Banks Profitability: Update – December 2016

 

Since December 2016, there are several new studies published which study low interest rates and Banks profitability.

 

 

Liberty State economics – a Blog of New York Federal Reserve has published a new column in June 2017.

Low Interest Rates and Bank Profits

 

 

Reduced Viability? Banks, Insurance Companies, and Low Interest Rates

CFA Institute

2016

CFA Institute Blog: Low Interest Rates and Banks

 

 

Changes in Profitability for Primary Dealers since the Financial Crisis

Benjamin Allen

Skidmore College

2017

Changes in Profitability for Primary Dealers since the Financial Crisis

 

 

Deloitte Consulting has published a new report in 2017 on Bank Models viability in environment of low interest rates.

Business model analysis European banking sector model in question

 

THE EFFECT OF NEGATIVE INTEREST RATES ON EUROPEAN BANKING
July 7, 2016
International banker

 

https://internationalbanker.com/banking/effect-negative-interest-rates-european-banking/

 

 

Low interest rates place a strain on the banks

bank of Finland

2016

https://www.bofbulletin.fi/en/2016/2/low-interest-rates-place-a-strain-on-the-banks/

 

 

The profitability of EU banks: Hard work or a lost cause?

KPMG

October 2016

 

https://assets.kpmg.com/content/dam/kpmg/xx/pdf/2016/10/the-profitability-of-eu-banks.pdf

 

 

The influence of monetary policy on bank profitability

Claudio Borio

2017

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/infi.12104/abstract

 

 

Can Low Interest Rates be Harmful: An Assessment of the Bank Risk-Taking Channel in Asia

2014

Asian Development Bank

 

https://www.adb.org/sites/default/files/publication/31204/reiwp-123-can-low-interest-rates-harmful.pdf

 

 

Determinants of bank’s interest margin in the aftermath of the crisis: the effect of interest rates and the yield curve slope

Paula Cruz-García, Juan Fernández de Guevara and Joaquín Maudos

 

http://www.uv.es/inteco/jornadas/jornadas13/Cruz-Garcia,%20Fernandez%20and%20Maudos_XIII%20Inteco%20Workshop.pdf

 

 

Dutch Central Bank has published a new study in November of 2016 on Banks’ Profitability and risk taking in a prolonged environment of Low Interest Rates.

Bank profitability and risk taking in a prolonged environment of low interest rates: a study of interest rate risk in the banking book of Dutch banks

 

 

Net interest margin in a low interest rate environment: Evidence for Slovenia

Net interest margin in a low interest rate environment: Evidence for Slovenia

 

Global Financial Stability Report, April 2017: Getting the Policy Mix Right

IMF

2017

IMF Global Financial Stability Report April 2017

 

 

Negative Interest Rates: Forecasting Banks’ Profitability in a New Environment

Stefan Kerbl, Michael Sigmund

Bank of Finland

Negative Interest Rates: Forecasting Banks’ Profitability in a New Environment

 

 

Low Interest Rates and the Financial System

Remarks by Jerome H. Powell
Member Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System
at the 77th Annual Meeting of the American Finance Association
Chicago, Illinois
January 7, 2017

https://www.federalreserve.gov/newsevents/speech/powell20170107a.pdf

 

 

Bad zero: Financial Stability in a Low Interest Rate Environment

Elena Carletti  Giuseppe Ferrero

18 June 2017

https://www.dnb.nl/en/binaries/paper%20Carletti_Ferrero_18June2017_tcm47-360758.pdf

Short term Thinking in Investment Decisions of Businesses and Financial Markets

Short term Thinking in Investment Decisions of Businesses and Financial Markets

 

When companies buyback shares and pay dividends rather than investing in new capacity, it leads to low economic growth and low aggregate demand.

Central Banks respond by cutting interest rates.  Yet Businesses do not invest in new capacity.

Many studies attribute this to short term thinking dominant in corporate investment decisions.  Pressures from shareholders push corporate managers to be short term oriented.

Many economists and thinkers have criticized this recently as advanced economies are suffering from anemic growth.

Larry Summers has invoked Secular Stagnation.  He says one of the reason for Secular Stagnation is short term thinking.

Andy Haldane of Bank of England has criticized short term thinking as it prevents investments and causes low economic growth.

Key Terms:

  • Quarterly Capitalism
  • Secular Stagnation
  • Short Term Thinking
  • Low Economic Growth
  • Business Investments
  • Real Interest Rates
  • Monetary Policy
  • Income and Wealth Inequality
  • Aggregate Demand
  • Productive Capacity
  • Productivity growth
  • Long Term Investments
  • Share Buybacks
  • Dividends
  • Corporate Cash Pools

 

Capitalism for the Long Term

The near meltdown of the financial system and the ensuing Great Recession have been, and will remain, the defining issue for the current generation of executives. Now that the worst seems to be behind us, it’s tempting to feel deep relief—and a strong desire to return to the comfort of business as usual. But that is simply not an option. In the past three years we’ve already seen a dramatic acceleration in the shifting balance of power between the developed West and the emerging East, a rise in populist politics and social stresses in a number of countries, and significant strains on global governance systems. As the fallout from the crisis continues, we’re likely to see increased geopolitical rivalries, new international security challenges, and rising tensions from trade, migration, and resource competition. For business leaders, however, the most consequential outcome of the crisis is the challenge to capitalism itself.

That challenge did not just arise in the wake of the Great Recession. Recall that trust in business hit historically low levels more than a decade ago. But the crisis and the surge in public antagonism it unleashed have exacerbated the friction between business and society. On top of anxiety about persistent problems such as rising income inequality, we now confront understandable anger over high unemployment, spiraling budget deficits, and a host of other issues. Governments feel pressure to reach ever deeper inside businesses to exert control and prevent another system-shattering event.

My goal here is not to offer yet another assessment of the actions policymakers have taken or will take as they try to help restart global growth. The audience I want to engage is my fellow business leaders. After all, much of what went awry before and after the crisis stemmed from failures of governance, decision making, and leadership within companies. These are failures we can and should address ourselves.

In an ongoing effort that started 18 months ago, I’ve met with more than 400 business and government leaders across the globe. Those conversations have reinforced my strong sense that, despite a certain amount of frustration on each side, the two groups share the belief that capitalism has been and can continue to be the greatest engine of prosperity ever devised—and that we will need it to be at the top of its job-creating, wealth-generating game in the years to come. At the same time, there is growing concern that if the fundamental issues revealed in the crisis remain unaddressed and the system fails again, the social contract between the capitalist system and the citizenry may truly rupture, with unpredictable but severely damaging results.

Most important, the dialogue has clarified for me the nature of the deep reform that I believe business must lead—nothing less than a shift from what I call quarterly capitalism to what might be referred to as long-term capitalism. (For a rough definition of “long term,” think of the time required to invest in and build a profitable new business, which McKinsey research suggests is at least five to seven years.) This shift is not just about persistently thinking and acting with a next-generation view—although that’s a key part of it. It’s about rewiring the fundamental ways we govern, manage, and lead corporations. It’s also about changing how we view business’s value and its role in society.

There are three essential elements of the shift. First, business and finance must jettison their short-term orientation and revamp incentives and structures in order to focus their organizations on the long term. Second, executives must infuse their organizations with the perspective that serving the interests of all major stakeholders—employees, suppliers, customers, creditors, communities, the environment—is not at odds with the goal of maximizing corporate value; on the contrary, it’s essential to achieving that goal. Third, public companies must cure the ills stemming from dispersed and disengaged ownership by bolstering boards’ ability to govern like owners.

When making major decisions, Asians typically think in terms of at least 10 to 15 years. In the U.S. and Europe, nearsightedness is the norm.

None of these ideas, or the specific proposals that follow, are new. What is new is the urgency of the challenge. Business leaders today face a choice: We can reform capitalism, or we can let capitalism be reformed for us, through political measures and the pressures of an angry public. The good news is that the reforms will not only increase trust in the system; they will also strengthen the system itself. They will unleash the innovation needed to tackle the world’s grand challenges, pave the way for a new era of shared prosperity, and restore public faith in business.

1. Fight the Tyranny of Short-Termism

As a Canadian who for 25 years has counseled business, public sector, and nonprofit leaders across the globe (I’ve lived in Toronto, Sydney, Seoul, Shanghai, and now London), I’ve had a privileged glimpse into different societies’ values and how leaders in various cultures think. In my view, the most striking difference between East and West is the time frame leaders consider when making major decisions. Asians typically think in terms of at least 10 to 15 years. For example, in my discussions with the South Korean president Lee Myung-bak shortly after his election in 2008, he asked us to help come up with a 60-year view of his country’s future (though we settled for producing a study called National Vision 2020.) In the U.S. and Europe, nearsightedness is the norm. I believe that having a long-term perspective is the competitive advantage of many Asian economies and businesses today.

Myopia plagues Western institutions in every sector. In business, the mania over quarterly earnings consumes extraordinary amounts of senior time and attention. Average CEO tenure has dropped from 10 to six years since 1995, even as the complexity and scale of firms have grown. In politics, democracies lurch from election to election, with candidates proffering dubious short-term panaceas while letting long-term woes in areas such as economic competitiveness, health, and education fester. Even philanthropy often exhibits a fetish for the short term and the new, with grantees expected to become self-sustaining in just a few years.

Lost in the frenzy is the notion that long-term thinking is essential for long-term success. Consider Toyota, whose journey to world-class manufacturing excellence was years in the making. Throughout the 1950s and 1960s it endured low to nonexistent sales in the U.S.—and it even stopped exporting altogether for one bleak four-year period—before finally emerging in the following decades as a global leader. Think of Hyundai, which experienced quality problems in the late 1990s but made a comeback by reengineering its cars for long-term value—a strategy exemplified by its unprecedented introduction, in 1999, of a 10-year car warranty. That radical move, viewed by some observers as a formula for disaster, helped Hyundai quadruple U.S. sales in three years and paved the way for its surprising entry into the luxury market.

To be sure, long-term perspectives can be found in the West as well. For example, in 1985, in the face of fierce Japanese competition, Intel famously decided to abandon its core business, memory chips, and focus on the then-emerging business of microprocessors. This “wrenching” decision was “nearly inconceivable” at the time, says Andy Grove, who was then the company’s president. Yet by making it, Intel emerged in a few years on top of a new multi-billion-dollar industry. Apple represents another case in point. The iPod, released in 2001, sold just 400,000 units in its first year, during which Apple’s share price fell by roughly 25%. But the board took the long view. By late 2009 the company had sold 220 million iPods—and revolutionized the music business.

It’s fair to say, however, that such stories are countercultural. In the 1970s the average holding period for U.S. equities was about seven years; now it’s more like seven months. According to a recent paper by Andrew Haldane, of the Bank of England, such churning has made markets far more volatile and produced yawning gaps between corporations’ market price and their actual value. Then there are the “hyperspeed” traders (some of whom hold stocks for only a few seconds), who now account for 70% of all U.S. equities trading, by one estimate. In response to these trends, executives must do a better job of filtering input, and should give more weight to the views of investors with a longer-term, buy-and-hold orientation.

If they don’t, short-term capital will beget short-term management through a natural chain of incentives and influence. If CEOs miss their quarterly earnings targets, some big investors agitate for their removal. As a result, CEOs and their top teams work overtime to meet those targets. The unintended upshot is that they manage for only a small portion of their firm’s value. When McKinsey’s finance experts deconstruct the value expectations embedded in share prices, we typically find that 70% to 90% of a company’s value is related to cash flows expected three or more years out. If the vast majority of most firms’ value depends on results more than three years from now, but management is preoccupied with what’s reportable three months from now, then capitalism has a problem.

Roughly 70% of all U.S. equities trading is now done by “hyperspeed” traders—some of whom hold stocks for only a few seconds.

Some rightly resist playing this game. Unilever, Coca-Cola, and Ford, to name just a few, have stopped issuing earnings guidance altogether. Google never did. IBM has created five-year road maps to encourage investors to focus more on whether it will reach its long-term earnings targets than on whether it exceeds or misses this quarter’s target by a few pennies. “I can easily make my numbers by cutting SG&A or R&D, but then we wouldn’t get the innovations we need,” IBM’s CEO, Sam Palmisano, told us recently. Mark Wiseman, executive vice president at the Canada Pension Plan Investment Board, advocates investing “for the next quarter century,” not the next quarter. And Warren Buffett has quipped that his ideal holding period is “forever.” Still, these remain admirable exceptions.

To break free of the tyranny of short-termism, we must start with those who provide capital. Taken together, pension funds, insurance companies, mutual funds, and sovereign wealth funds hold $65 trillion, or roughly 35% of the world’s financial assets. If these players focus too much attention on the short term, capitalism as a whole will, too.

In theory they shouldn’t, because the beneficiaries of these funds have an obvious interest in long-term value creation. But although today’s standard practices arose from the desire to have a defensible, measurable approach to portfolio management, they have ended up encouraging shortsightedness. Fund trustees, often advised by investment consultants, assess their money managers’ performance relative to benchmark indices and offer only short-term contracts. Those managers’ compensation is linked to the amount of assets they manage, which typically rises when short-term performance is strong. Not surprisingly, then, money managers focus on such performance—and pass this emphasis along to the companies in which they invest. And so it goes, on down the line.

Only 45% of those surveyed in the U.S. and the UK expressed trust in business. This stands in stark contrast to developing countries: For example, the figure is 61% in China, 70% in India, and 81% in Brazil.

As the stewardship advocate Simon Wong points out, under the current system pension funds deem an asset manager who returns 10% to have underperformed if the relevant benchmark index rises by 12%. Would it be unthinkable for institutional investors instead to live with absolute gains on the (perfectly healthy) order of 10%—especially if they like the approach that delivered those gains—and review performance every three or five years, instead of dropping the 10-percenter? Might these big funds set targets for the number of holdings and rates of turnover, at least within the “fundamental investing” portion of their portfolios, and more aggressively monitor those targets? More radically, might they end the practice of holding thousands of stocks and achieve the benefits of diversification with fewer than a hundred—thereby increasing their capacity to effectively engage with the businesses they own and improve long-term performance? Finally, could institutional investors beef up their internal skills and staff to better execute such an agenda? These are the kinds of questions we need to address if we want to align capital’s interests more closely with capitalism’s.

2. Serve Stakeholders, Enrich Shareholders

The second imperative for renewing capitalism is disseminating the idea that serving stakeholders is essential to maximizing corporate value. Too often these aims are presented as being in tension: You’re either a champion of shareholder value or you’re a fan of the stakeholders. This is a false choice.

The inspiration for shareholder-value maximization, an idea that took hold in the 1970s and 1980s, was reasonable: Without some overarching financial goal with which to guide and gauge a firm’s performance, critics feared, managers could divert corporate resources to serve their own interests rather than the owners’. In fact, in the absence of concrete targets, management might become an exercise in politics and stakeholder engagement an excuse for inefficiency. Although this thinking was quickly caricatured in popular culture as the doctrine of “greed is good,” and was further tarnished by some companies’ destructive practices in its name, in truth there was never any inherent tension between creating value and serving the interests of employees, suppliers, customers, creditors, communities, and the environment. Indeed, thoughtful advocates of value maximization have always insisted that it is long-term value that has to be maximized.

Capitalism’s founding philosopher voiced an even bolder aspiration. “All the members of human society stand in need of each others assistance, and are likewise exposed to mutual injuries,” Adam Smith wrote in his 1759 work, The Theory of Moral Sentiments. “The wise and virtuous man,” he added, “is at all times willing that his own private interest should be sacrificed to the public interest,” should circumstances so demand.

Smith’s insight into the profound interdependence between business and society, and how that interdependence relates to long-term value creation, still reverberates. In 2008 and again in 2010, McKinsey surveyed nearly 2,000 executives and investors; more than 75% said that environmental, social, and governance (ESG) initiatives create corporate value in the long term. Companies that bring a real stakeholder perspective into corporate strategy can generate tangible value even sooner. (See the sidebar “Who’s Getting It Right?”)

Creating direct business value, however, is not the only or even the strongest argument for taking a societal perspective. Capitalism depends on public trust for its legitimacy and its very survival. According to the Edelman public relations agency’s just-released 2011 Trust Barometer, trust in business in the U.S. and the UK (although up from mid-crisis record lows) is only in the vicinity of 45%. This stands in stark contrast to developing countries: For example, the figure is 61% in China, 70% in India, and 81% in Brazil. The picture is equally bleak for individual corporations in the Anglo-American world, “which saw their trust rankings drop again last year to near-crisis lows,” says Richard Edelman.

How can business leaders restore the public’s trust? Many Western executives find that nothing in their careers has prepared them for this new challenge. Lee Scott, Walmart’s former CEO, has been refreshingly candid about arriving in the top job with a serious blind spot. He was plenty busy minding the store, he says, and had little feel for the need to engage as a statesman with groups that expected something more from the world’s largest company. Fortunately, Scott was a fast learner, and Walmart has become a leader in environmental and health care issues.

Tomorrow’s CEOs will have to be, in Joseph Nye’s apt phrase, “tri-sector athletes”: able and experienced in business, government, and the social sector. But the pervading mind-set gets in the way of building those leadership and management muscles. “Analysts and investors are focused on the short term,” one executive told me recently. “They believe social initiatives don’t create value in the near term.” In other words, although a large majority of executives believe that social initiatives create value in the long term, they don’t act on this belief, out of fear that financial markets might frown. Getting capital more aligned with capitalism should help businesses enrich shareholders by better serving stakeholders.

3. Act Like You Own the Place

As the financial sector’s troubles vividly exposed, when ownership is broadly fragmented, no one acts like he’s in charge. Boards, as they currently operate, don’t begin to serve as a sufficient proxy. All the Devils Are Here, by Bethany McLean and Joe Nocera, describes how little awareness Merrill Lynch’s board had of the firm’s soaring exposure to subprime mortgage instruments until it was too late. “I actually don’t think risk management failed,” Larry Fink, the CEO of the investment firm BlackRock, said during a 2009 debate about the future of capitalism, sponsored by the Financial Times. “I think corporate governance failed, because…the boards didn’t ask the right questions.”

What McKinsey has learned from studying successful family-owned companies suggests a way forward: The most effective ownership structure tends to combine some exposure in the public markets (for the discipline and capital access that exposure helps provide) with a significant, committed, long-term owner. Most large public companies, however, have extremely dispersed ownership, and boards rarely perform the single-owner-proxy role. As a result, CEOs too often listen to the investors (and members of the media) who make the most noise. Unfortunately, those parties tend to be the most nearsighted ones. And so the tyranny of the short term is reinforced.

The answer is to renew corporate governance by rooting it in committed owners and by giving those owners effective mechanisms with which to influence management. We call this ownership-based governance, and it requires three things:

Just 43% of the nonexecutive directors of public companies believe they significantly influence strategy. For this to change, board members must devote much more time to their roles.

More-effective boards.

In the absence of a dominant shareholder (and many times when there is one), the board must represent a firm’s owners and serve as the agent of long-term value creation. Even among family firms, the executives of the top-performing companies wield their influence through the board. But only 43% of the nonexecutive directors of public companies believe they significantly influence strategy. For this to change, board members must devote much more time to their roles. A government-commissioned review of the governance of British banks last year recommended an enormous increase in the time required of nonexecutive directors of banks—from the current average, between 12 and 20 days annually, to between 30 and 36 days annually. What’s especially needed is an increase in the informal time board members spend with investors and executives. The nonexecutive board directors of companies owned by private equity firms spend 54 days a year, on average, attending to the company’s business, and 70% of that time consists of informal meetings and conversations. Four to five days a month obviously give a board member much greater understanding and impact than the three days a quarter (of which two may be spent in transit) devoted by the typical board member of a public company.

Boards also need much more relevant experience. Industry knowledge—which four of five nonexecutive directors of big companies lack—helps boards identify immediate opportunities and reduce risk. Contextual knowledge about the development path of an industry—for example, whether the industry is facing consolidation, disruption from new technologies, or increased regulation—is highly valuable, too. Such insight is often obtained from experience with other industries that have undergone a similar evolution.

In addition, boards need more-effective committee structures—obtainable through, for example, the establishment of a strategy committee or of dedicated committees for large business units. Directors also need the resources to allow them to form independent views on strategy, risk, and performance (perhaps by having a small analytical staff that reports only to them). This agenda implies a certain professionalization of nonexecutive directorships and a more meaningful strategic partnership between boards and top management. It may not please some executive teams accustomed to boards they can easily “manage.” But given the failures of governance to date, it is a necessary change.

More-sensible CEO pay.

An important task of governance is setting executive compensation. Although 70% of board directors say that pay should be tied more closely to performance, CEO pay is too often structured to reward a leader simply for having made it to the top, not for what he or she does once there. Meanwhile, polls show that the disconnect between pay and performance is contributing to the decline in public esteem for business.

Companies should create real risk for executives.Some experts privately suggest mandating that new executives invest a year’s salary in the company.

CEOs and other executives should be paid to act like owners. Once upon a time we thought that stock options would achieve this result, but stock-option- based compensation schemes have largely incentivized the wrong behavior. When short-dated, options lead to a focus on meeting quarterly earnings estimates; even when long-dated (those that vest after three years or more), they can reward managers for simply surfing industry- or economy-wide trends (although reviewing performance against an appropriate peer index can help minimize free rides). Moreover, few compensation schemes carry consequences for failure—something that became clear during the financial crisis, when many of the leaders of failed institutions retired as wealthy people.

There will never be a one-size-fits-all solution to this complex issue, but companies should push for change in three key areas:

• They should link compensation to the fundamental drivers of long-term value, such as innovation and efficiency, not just to share price.

• They should extend the time frame for executive evaluations—for example, using rolling three-year performance evaluations, or requiring five-year plans and tracking performance relative to plan. This would, of course, require an effective board that is engaged in strategy formation.

• They should create real downside risk for executives, perhaps by requiring them to put some skin in the game. Some experts we’ve surveyed have privately suggested mandating that new executives invest a year’s salary in the company.

Redefined shareholder “democracy.”

The huge increase in equity churn in recent decades has spawned an anomaly of governance: At any annual meeting, a large number of those voting may soon no longer be shareholders. The advent of high-frequency trading will only worsen this trend. High churn rates, short holding periods, and vote-buying practices may mean the demise of the “one share, one vote” principle of governance, at least in some circumstances. Indeed, many large, top-performing companies, such as Google, have never adhered to it. Maybe it’s time for new rules that would give greater weight to long-term owners, like the rule in some French companies that gives two votes to shares held longer than a year. Or maybe it would make sense to assign voting rights based on the average turnover of an investor’s portfolio. If we want capitalism to focus on the long term, updating our notions of shareholder democracy in such ways will soon seem less like heresy and more like common sense.

While I remain convinced that capitalism is the economic system best suited to advancing the human condition, I’m equally persuaded that it must be renewed, both to deal with the stresses and volatility ahead and to restore business’s standing as a force for good, worthy of the public’s trust. The deficiencies of the quarterly capitalism of the past few decades were not deficiencies in capitalism itself—just in that particular variant. By rebuilding capitalism for the long term, we can make it stronger, more resilient, more equitable, and better able to deliver the sustainable growth the world needs. The three imperatives outlined above can be a start along this path and, I hope, a way to launch the conversation; others will have their own ideas to add.

The kind of deep-seated, systemic changes I’m calling for can be achieved only if boards, business executives, and investors around the world take responsibility for bettering the system they lead. Such changes will not be easy; they are bound to encounter resistance, and business leaders today have more than enough to do just to keep their companies running well. We must make the effort regardless. If capitalism emerges from the crisis vibrant and renewed, future generations will thank us. But if we merely paper over the cracks and return to our precrisis views, we will not want to read what the historians of the future will write. The time to reflect—and to act—is now.

 

Please see my other related posts.

Business Investments and Low Interest Rates

Mergers and Acquisitions – Long Term Trends and Waves

 

 

Key sources of Research:

Secular stagnation and low investment: Breaking the vicious cycle—a discussion paper

McKinsey

http://www.mckinsey.com/global-themes/europe/secular-stagnation-and-low-investment-breaking-the-vicious-cycle

Case Still Out on Whether Corporate Short-Termism Is a Problem

Larry Summers

http://larrysummers.com/2017/02/09/case-still-out-on-whether-corporate-short-termism-is-a-problem/

Where companies with a long-term view outperform their peers

McKinsey

http://www.mckinsey.com/global-themes/long-term-capitalism/where-companies-with-a-long-term-view-outperform-their-peers

How short-term thinking hampers long-term economic growth

FT

https://www.ft.com/content/8c868a98-b821-11e4-b6a5-00144feab7de

Anthony Hilton: Short-term thinking hits nations as a whole, not just big business

http://www.standard.co.uk/comment/comment/anthony-hilton-short-term-thinking-hits-nations-as-a-whole-not-just-big-business-10427294.html

Short-termism in business: causes, mechanisms and consequences

EY Poland Report

http://www.ey.com/Publication/vwLUAssets/EY_Poland_Report/$FILE/Short-termism_raport_EY.pdf

Overcoming the Barriers to Long-term Thinking in Financial Markets

Ruth Curran and Alice Chapple
Forum for the Future

https://www.forumforthefuture.org/sites/default/files/project/downloads/long-term-thinking-fpf-report-july-11.pdf

Understanding Short-Termism: Questions and Consequences

http://rooseveltinstitute.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/Understanding-Short-Termism.pdf

Ending Short-Termism : An Investment Agenda for Growth

http://rooseveltinstitute.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/Ending-Short-Termism.pdf

The Short Long

Speech by
Andrew G Haldane, Executive Director, Financial Stability, and Richard Davies

Brussels May 2011

http://www.bankofengland.co.uk/archive/Documents/historicpubs/speeches/2011/speech495.pdf

Capitalism for the Long Term

Dominic Barton

From the March 2011 Issue

https://hbr.org/2011/03/capitalism-for-the-long-term

Quarterly capitalism: The pervasive effects of short-termism and austerity

https://currentlyunderdevelopment.wordpress.com/2016/05/10/quarterly-capitalism-the-pervasive-effects-of-short-termism-and-austerity/

Is Short-Term Behavior Jeopardizing the Future Prosperity of Business?

http://www.wlrk.com/docs/IsShortTermBehaviorJeopardizingTheFutureProsperityOfBusiness_CEOStrategicimplications.pdf

Andrew G Haldane: The short long

Speech by Mr Andrew Haldane, Executive Director, Financial Stability, and Mr Richard
Davies, Economist, Financial Institutions Division, Bank of England,
at the 29th Société
Universitaire Européene de Recherches Financières Colloquium,
Brussels, 11 May 2011

http://www.bis.org/review/r110511e.pdf

THE UNEASY CASE FOR FAVORING LONG-TERM SHAREHOLDERS

Jesse M. Fried

https://dash.harvard.edu/bitstream/handle/1/17985223/Fried_795.pdf?sequence=1

The fringe economic theory that might get traction in the 2016 campaign

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2015/03/02/the-fringe-economic-theory-that-might-get-traction-in-the-2016-campaign/?utm_term=.932bc0b97758

FCLT Global:  Focusing Capital on the Long Term

Publications

http://www.fcltglobal.org/insights/publications

Finally, Evidence That Managing for the Long Term Pays Off

Dominic Barton

James Manyika

Sarah Keohane Williamson

February 07, 2017 UPDATED February 09, 2017

https://hbr.org/2017/02/finally-proof-that-managing-for-the-long-term-pays-off

Focusing Capital on the Long Term

Dominic Barton

Mark Wiseman

From the January–February 2014 Issue

Is Corporate Short-Termism Really a Problem? The Jury’s Still Out

Lawrence H. Summers

February 16, 2017

Yes, Short-Termism Really Is a Problem

Roger L. Martin

October 09, 2015

Long-Termism or Lemons

The Role of Public Policy in Promoting Long-Term Investments

By Marc Jarsulic, Brendan V. Duke, and Michael Madowitz October 2015

Center for American Progress

https://cdn.americanprogress.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/21060054/LongTermism-reportB.pdf

 

Overcoming Short-termism: A Call for A More Responsible Approach to Investment and Business Management

https://corpgov.law.harvard.edu/2009/09/11/overcoming-short-termism-a-call-for-a-more-responsible-approach-to-investment-and-business-management/

 

 

Focusing capital on the Long Term

Jean-Hugues Monier – Senior Parter – McKinsey & Company

Princeton University – November 2016

http://jrc.princeton.edu/sites/jrc/files/jean-hugues_j._monier_slides_final.pdf