Global US Dollar Funding Markets

Global US Dollar Funding MarkeTS

When US interest rates decline ( accomadating monetary policy), funding flows increase in to USA. (Money markets). Driven by increase in loans in USA.

When US interest rates increase (tightening of Monetary policy), capital Investment flows increase into USA. (Capital Markets). Driven by search for yields.

Key Terms

  • Eurodollars
  • International Money Markets
  • Funding Markets
  • Shadow Banking
  • Money Flows
  • Capital Flows
  • Round Tripping
  • International Financial System
  • FX Market
  • FX Swaps
  • FX Reserves
  • Payment Flows
  • Funding Flows
  • Eurocurrency
  • EuroEuro
  • EuroYen
  • EuroRMB
  • FX Forwards
  • Currency Swaps

International Markets for US Dollar

US dollar is currently predominant currency in global financial markets.

Its use is wide spread and deep.

  • Cross Border Loans
  • International Debt Securities
  • FX Transactions
  • Official Public FX Reserves
  • Trade Invoicing
  • SWIFT Payments

How are dollars funded by institutions involved in international credit markets?

  • Euro Dollars
  • FX Swaps and Forwards
  • Currency Swaps

Please see this new publication from BIS for details.

US DOLLAR FUNDING: AN INTERNATIONAL PERSPECTIVE

The US dollar plays a central role in the international monetary and financial system. It is the foremost funding currency, with about half of all cross-border loans and international debt securities denominated in US dollars. Around 85% of all foreign exchange transactions occur against the US dollar. It is the world’s primary reserve currency, accounting for 61% of official foreign exchange reserves. Around half of international trade is invoiced in US dollars, and around 40% of international payments are made in US dollars (Graph 1).

Image Source: US DOLLAR FUNDING: AN INTERNATIONAL PERSPECTIVE

Currencies in Global Payments

Image Source: RMB Tracker

Currencies in Trade Finance Market

Image Source: RMB Tracker

Currencies in FX Spot market

Image Source: RMB Tracker

Characteristics of Global US Dollar Funding Markets

Image Source: US DOLLAR FUNDING: AN INTERNATIONAL PERSPECTIVE

Image Source: US DOLLAR FUNDING: AN INTERNATIONAL PERSPECTIVE

Image Source: THE GLOBAL ROLE OF THE US DOLLAR AND ITS CONSEQUENCES

Image Source: THE GLOBAL ROLE OF THE US DOLLAR AND ITS CONSEQUENCES

Image Source: THE GLOBAL ROLE OF THE US DOLLAR AND ITS CONSEQUENCES

Image Source: THE GLOBAL ROLE OF THE US DOLLAR AND ITS CONSEQUENCES

Image Source: FX swaps and forwards: missing global debt?

Image Source: FX swaps and forwards: missing global debt?

Assets and Liabilities of Banks and Shadow Banks in Onshore and Offshore markets

Assets and Liabilities in Balance sheets in Onshore markets

Image Source: Offshore Dollar Creation and the Emergence of the post-2008 International Monetary System

Liabilities in Balance sheets of Financial Intermediatory in Onshore and Offshore markets

Image Source: The Future of Offshore Dollar Creation: Four Scenarios for the International Monetary System by 2040

Transactions Chains in cross border funding markets

Image Source: US DOLLAR FUNDING: AN INTERNATIONAL PERSPECTIVE

Money Inflows and RounD tripping

Several papers and articles in the references below discuss issues of US dollar inflows on US money and credit markets and monetary policy.

Round tripping involves foreign banks borrowing money from US funding markets and lending it to borrowers in the capital/credit markets.

US monetary policy also impacts capital outflows and inflows.

My Related posts

Global Liquidity and Cross Border Capital Flows

Global Flow of Funds: Statistical Data Matrix across National Boundaries

Low Interest Rates and International Capital Flows

Currency Credit Networks of International Banks

Global Financial Safety Net: Regional Reserve Pools and Currency Swap Networks of Central Banks

Balance Sheet Economics – Financial Input-Output Analysis (using Asset Liability Matrices) – Update March 2018

TARGET2 Imbalances in European Monetary Union (EMU)

Contagion in Financial (Balance sheets) Networks

Balance Sheets, Financial Interconnectedness, and Financial Stability – G20 Data Gaps Initiative

Foundations of Balance Sheet Economics

The Future of FX Markets – Update October 2019

Understanding Global OTC Foreign Exchange (FX) Market

Economics of Trade Finance

The Dollar Shortage, Again! in International Wholesale Money Markets

Repo Chains and Financial Instability

Shadow Banking

Key Sources of Research

US dollar funding: an international perspective

Report prepared by a Working Group chaired by
Sally Davies (Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System) and Christopher Kent (Reserve Bank of Australia)

BIS June 2020

The Eurodollar Market in the United States

MAY 27, 2015

NYFED

https://libertystreeteconomics.newyorkfed.org/2015/05/the-eurodollar-market-in-the-united-states.html

The global role of the US dollar and its consequences

Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin

2017 Q4

“Down The Rabbit Hole” — The Eurodollar Market Is The Matrix Behind It All

the1millionproject

Apr 19

by Tyler Durden

https://t1mproject.medium.com/down-the-rabbit-hole-the-eurodollar-market-is-the-matrix-behind-it-all-a7a054dd4b0f

The Fed’s Quandary With Uncle ED (Eurodollar)

Feb. 28, 2015 4:45 AM ET

https://seekingalpha.com/article/2961016-the-feds-quandary-with-uncle-ed-eurodollar

US Monetary Aggregates, Income Velocity and the Euro-dollar Market

BIS 1980Warren D. McClam

Chapter 5 EURODOLLARS 

Marvin Goodfriend

Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond Richmond, Virginia
1998

The evolution of the Offshore US-Dollar System: past, present and four possible futures

Steffen Murau, Joe Rini and Armin Haas

Global Development Policy Center, Boston University, Boston; City Political Economy Research Centre (CITYPERC), City, University of London, London; Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies (IASS), Potsdam and Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies (IASS), Potsdam
*Corresponding author. Email: armin.haas@iass.de

(Received 30 September 2019; revised 17 March 2020; accepted 24 March 2020; first published online 6 May 2020)

https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/journal-of-institutional-economics/article/evolution-of-the-offshore-usdollar-system-past-present-and-four-possible-futures/B36ED9082CECE54F3F5B8E8F40D15148/core-reader

Hyper-Stablecoinization: From Eurodollars to Crypto-Dollars

Pascal Hügli

July 12, 2020·

https://finance.yahoo.com/news/hyper-stablecoinization-eurodollars-crypto-dollars-120000891.html

IMPACT OF EURO-MARKETS ON THE UNITED STATES BALANCE OF PAYMENTS

*FRED H. KLOpSTOCKf

Financial globalization as positive integration: monetary technocrats and the Eurodollar market in the 1970s

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/340100333_Financial_globalization_as_positive_integration_monetary_technocrats_and_the_Eurodollar_market_in_the_1970s

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09692290.2020.1740291

The Euromarket and the making of the transnational network of finance 1959 – 1979 (Doctoral thesis).

Kim, S. W. (2018). 

University of Cambridge

 https://doi.org/10.17863/CAM.23876

https://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/276574

Dollar Shortage and Eurodollars

By Prashant K. Trivedi and Krushi Parekh | Apr 14 2020 | What We Are Writing, Global Macro

https://multi-act.com/dollar-shortage-and-eurodollars/

Evolution of US-Dollar-Centric International Money Markets and Pro-Cyclicality of Basel III Liquidity Framework

Oleksandr Valchyshen 2019

Bard College

Eurodollars and the US Money Supply

page1image2272994224

The dollar and international capital flows in the COVID-19 crisis 

Giancarlo Corsetti, Emile Marin  

03 April 2020

https://voxeu.org/article/covid-19-crisis-dollar-and-capital-flows

Crypto Dollars and the Evolution of Eurodollar Banking

MAX BRONSTEIN

7 APR 2020 

https://unexpected-values.com/crypto-dollars/

The $40 Trillion Problem

Apr. 6, 2020

Lyn Alden Schwartzer

https://seekingalpha.com/article/4336136-40-trillion-problem

Euro-Dollars and United States Monetary Policy. 

Cort Burk Schlichting 1973

Louisiana State University and Agricultural & Mechanical College

Eurodollar Banking and Currency Internationalization

  • January 2013
  • In book: Investing in Asian Offshore Currency Markets (pp.199-214)

Authors:

Dong He

Robert Neil Mccauley

BIS

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/304796024_Eurodollar_Banking_and_Currency_Internationalization

The Eurodollar Market, Short-term Capital Flows and Currency Crises

Book 1979

Author: Leonard Gomes

Publisher: Macmillan Education UK

https://www.springerprofessional.de/en/the-eurodollar-market-short-term-capital-flows-and-currency-cris/10146406

The Eurodollar Market and the International Transmission of Interest Rates

Jay H. Levin

The Canadian Journal of Economics / Revue canadienne d’Economique 

Vol. 7, No. 2 (May, 1974), pp. 205-224 (20 pages) Published By: Wiley 

The Eurodollar Deposit Market: Stategies for Regulation

George H. Windecker Jr.

1993

American University International Law Review 9, no. 1 (1993): 357-384.

The circular flow of dollars in the world financial markets

Kashi NathTiwari

Available online 23 March 2002.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/104402839090012C

The Euro-dollar market as a source of United States bank liquidity

Steve B. Steib

Iowa State University

1972

RMB Tracker

SWIFT

https://www.swift.com/our-solutions/compliance-and-shared-services/business-intelligence/renminbi/rmb-tracker/rmb-tracker-document-centre

The Eurodollar Conundrum

FRBNY 1982

The federal funds market and the overnight Eurodollar market

Yungsook Lee

1999

Research Notes, No. 99-2, Deutsche Bank Research, Frankfurt

THE RISE AND FALL OF THE EURODOLLAR SYSTEM 

SEPTEMBER 2016

Offshore Dollar Creation and the Emergence of the post-2008 International Monetary System

Steffen Murau

The Future of Offshore Dollar Creation:
Four Scenarios for the International Monetary System by 2040

Steffen Murau, Joe Rini, Armin Haas

IASS Potsdam, in collaboration with Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, Harvard University

2017 | ‘The Political Economy of Private Credit Money Accommodation. A Study of Bank Notes, Bank Deposits and Shadow Money’, PhD thesis

7th November 2017  Private Credit Money Accommodation  by Steffen Murau

https://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/19010/

Towards a theory of shadow money

Daniela Gabor and Jakob Vestergaard

Private Debt as Shadow Money? Conceptual Criteria, Empirical Evaluation and Implications for Financial Stability

Steffen Murau1 and Tobias Pforr2 May 2020

Grey matter in shadow banking: international organizations and expert strategies in global financial governance

Cornel Bana, Leonard Seabrookeb and Sarah Freitasa

aBoston University, Boston, MA, USA; bDepartment of Business and Politics, Copenhagen Business School, Copenhagen, Denmark

The Politics of Shadow Money: Security Structures, Money Creation and Unconventional Central Banking

Pre-print version. Print version forthcoming in: New Political Economy Joscha Wullweber

Faculty of Economics University of Witten/Herdecke

REFORMING THE SHORT-TERM FUNDING MARKETS

Morgan Ricks

Discussion Paper No. 713 05/2012

Money and (Shadow) Banking: A Thought Experiment

Review of Banking and Financial Law, Vol. 31, 2011-2012

18 Pages Posted: 7 Apr 2013

Morgan Ricks

Vanderbilt University – Law School; European Corporate Governance Institute (ECGI)

Date Written: April 1, 2012

https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2245685

Privatized global money: The US-Dollar and the international monetary system — Steffen Murau interviewed by Dezernat Zukunft, Part 1

By Mathis Richtmann

FX swaps and forwards: missing global debt?

Claudio Borio Robert McCauley Patrick McGuire

claudio.borio@bis.org robert.mccauley@bis.org patrick.mcguire@bis.org

The Global Financial and Monetary System in 2030

WEFORUM

Global Liquidity Indicators

BIS

https://www.bis.org/statistics/gli.htm

The Financial Crisis and the Global Shadow Banking System

La crise financière et le Global Shadow Banking System

Maryse Farhi et Marcos Antonio Macedo Cintra

https://journals.openedition.org/regulation/7473

Rise of Debt and Market Based Finance

Rise of Debt and Market Based Finance

It is also known as Non Bank finance or Shadow Banking.

The key difference between traditional banking and shadow banking is fragmented credit chains in the shadow banking.

Traditional Banking does

  • Maturity Transformation
  • Liquidity Transformation
  • Credit Transformation

While traditional banking has backstops

  • Deposit Insurance
  • Central bank

Shadow Banks are not regulated and do not have advantage of backstops.

Hence they are susceptible to systemic risk and runs.

Questions

  • What is Market based Finance?
  • How big is the market?
  • Institutions?
  • Instruments?
  • Who are the borrowers?
  • Who are the investors?
  • What are the risks in market based finance?
  • Role of Central Banks?
  • How to minimize risks?
  • Regulations? Macro Prudential policies?
  • How are banks involved in market based finance?
  • How are they connected to each other and others?

Key Terms

  • Market based Finance MBF
  • Non Bank Credit Intermediation NCBI
  • Shadow Banking
  • Financial Stability
  • Systemic Risk
  • Liquidity Risk
  • Broker Dealers
  • Non Bank Finance NBF
  • Balance Sheet Economics
  • Market Makers
  • Capital Markets
  • Money Markets
  • Money View
  • Money Flows
  • Network Dynamics
  • Regulatory Arbitrage
  • Credit Chains
  • Fragmented Credit Chains
  • Financial Supply Chains
  • Credit Chain Length
  • Growth of Debt

Growth and Size of Market based Finance

Image Source: BANK AND NONBANK LENDING OVER THE PAST 70 YEARS

Image Source: Shining a Light on Shadow Banking

Image Source: The Shadow Banking System in the United States: Recent Developments and Economic Role

Image Source: Shining a Light on Shadow Banking

Image Source: NON-BANK FINANCE: TRENDS AND CHALLENGES

Image Source: THE GROWTH OF NON-BANK FINANCE AND NEW MONETARY POLICY TOOLS 

Image Source: SHADOW BANKING AND MARKET BASED FINANCE

Structural Dynamics of Banking and Financial System

Changes prior to Global Financial Crisis

  • Rise of Debt
  • Rise of Market Based Finance
  • Increase in capital flows both domestic and cross border

Debt dynamics is related to assets side of balance sheet of financial intemediatory.

Market based Finance is related to liabilities side of balance sheet of Financial Intermediatory.

If the chains of financial intermediation are long, then both assets and liabilities of each participant are linked.

Intermediation results in increase of capital flows. From money markets to capital markets. From deposits to loans. From liabilities to assets. There is both pull and push of money flows in the financial system. Demand for capital and supply of capital. They both are linked by banks and non bank finance. Growth of debt is linked to growth of money markets and non bank finance.

Size of Nonfinancial Business and Household Credit

Image Source: FINANCIAL STABILITY REPORT – NOVEMBER 2020

In a future post I will discuss debt in US and global financial system.

Please see my related posts for evolution of Financial System Complexity and Its dynamics.

Low Interest Rates and Banks’ Profitability – Update October 2020

Funding Sources and Liquidity for US Commercial Banks

Trends in Assets and Liabilities of Commercial Banks in the USA

Size and complexity arise together. Along with balance sheet expansion comes changes in links with counterparties (financial networks and interconnections).

Research continues in this area by several institutions and academics.

  • OECD
  • BIS
  • FED RESERVE
  • ECB
  • FSB
  • BOE
  • IMF
  • BOF
  • Others

Source: Structural developments in global financial intermediationThe rise of debt and non-bank credit intermediation

The global financial crisis of 2008 underlined the importance for policy makers in understanding the scale and types of financial intermediation in their economies. During the financial crisis, non-bank financial intermediation was of particular concern to authorities, as such forms of ‘shadow banking’, contributed to both the root causes of the crisis, the transmission of financial contagion, and the amplification of shocks.

As this report is published, the rapid spread of the novel coronavirus Covid-19 has caused a global health crisis, has brought economic activity in some sectors to a halt, and has presented the greatest challenge to the global financial system since 2008. As then, understanding financial intermediation activities is critical to mapping the faultlines in the global financial system and mounting effective policy responses.

However, the shape of financial intermediation has changed in important ways since the global financial crisis. Activities in non-bank intermediation, including market-based intermediaries like investment funds and securitised products, have grown and are increasingly interconnected with financial markets. Understanding the interplay between these elements, and the benefits and risks of each, offers a more complete understanding of how global finance can contribute to sustainable economic growth. It also helps provide the full picture needed to help policy makers prepare for and respond to shocks, including pandemics.

“Structural developments in global financial intermediation: The rise of debt and non-bank credit intermediation” shines a light on the evolution of global financial intermediation in three key ways. First, it maps the broad-based growth of financial intermediation relative to GDP in many advanced and emerging market economies, and with this growth a shift toward market-based finance. Second, it assesses the shift from equity to debt markets, and the growing imbalances in sovereign and corporate debt markets during a period of highly accommodative monetary policies. Third, it draws attention to key activities in credit intermediation that could contribute to structural vulnerabilities in the global financial system, including: a sharp rise of below-investment grade corporate debt, in particular leverage loans and collateralised loan obligations; the growth of open-ended investment funds that purchase high-yield debt and leveraged loans; and risks associated with the large stock of bank contingent convertible debt.

While these various activities have helped to satisfy investors’ reach for yield during years of market exuberance, they represent new potential faultlines of systemic risk in the event of exogenous shocks, be they from trade tensions, geopolitical risks or the current global pandemic. This report underlines the need for policy frameworks to adapt to market-based finance, and fully reflect the interaction between monetary, prudential, and regulatory tools on credit intermediation. It also underlines the need for dynamic microprudential and activities-based tools to help mitigate excessive risk taking with respect to liquidity and leverage.

By mapping the global financial system, evaluating growing imbalances and risks that could amplify shocks, and assessing the interaction between macro and regulatory tools, this report provides a practical complement to the OECD’s Policy Framework for Effective and Efficient Financial Regulations. Financial authorities should use this analysis to inform both their assessments of activities and risks, and efforts to maximise available tools to harness the benefits of market-based finance to support fair, efficient markets and sustainable economic growth.

Greg Medcraft Director, OECD Directorate for Financial and Enterprise Affairs

Image Source: UNDERSTANDING THE RISKS INHERENT IN SHADOW BANKING: A PRIMER AND PRACTICAL LESSONS LEARNED

Image Source: THE ECONOMICS OF SHADOW BANKING 

Image Source: IS SHADOW BANKING REALLY BANKING?

Table Source: SHADOW BANKING AND MARKET BASED FINANCE

Table 1. A Stylized View of Structural Characteristics of Credit-based Intermediation

Characteristic:Traditional BankingShadow BankingMarket-based Finance
Key Risk TransformationsLiquidity, maturity, leverageCredit enhancement,liquidity, maturity, leverageLess emphasis on credit enhancement and less opaque vs. shadow banking
Institutions Involved in Intermediation Single entityCan be many entities, interconnected through collateral chains and credit guaranteesSingle/few entities
Formal Ex-anteBackstopYesNo / IndirectNo
Implied Sponsor Supportn.a.Yes, can sometimes be contingent liabilitiesNo(insolvency remote)
Example of EntitiesCommercial bankSynthetic CDO, Structured Investment Vehicle (SIV), CNAV MMF, ABCP ConduitBond mutual fund, Distressed debt or PE partnership,Direct lending by pension fund
Main Form of LiabilitiesDebt and deposits,Wholesale & retail-financedDebt,Mainly wholesale financedHighly diverse –Short and long-term debt and equity,Retail & wholesale financed
Key Resulting Financial Stability Risk Systemic risk(institutional spillovers)Systemic risk(institutional spillovers)Shift in price of risk (market risk premia)

My Related Posts

Shadow Banking

Economics of Broker-Dealer Banks

Evolution of Banks Complexity

Low Interest Rates and International Capital Flows

Repo Chains and Financial Instability

Global Liquidity and Cross Border Capital Flows

The Dollar Shortage, Again! in International Wholesale Money Markets

Low Interest Rates and Banks’ Profitability – Update October 2020

Funding Sources and Liquidity for US Commercial Banks

Funding Strategies of Banks

Trends in Assets and Liabilities of Commercial Banks in the USA

Key sources of Research

The growth of non-bank finance and new monetary policy tools 

Adrien d’Avernas, Quentin Vandeweyer, Matthieu Darracq Pariès  

20 April 2020

https://voxeu.org/article/growth-non-bank-finance-and-new-monetary-policy-tools

Financial Stability Report

November 2019

Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System

Financial Intermediaries, Financial Stability, and Monetary Policy

Tobias Adrian and Hyun Song Shin
Federal Reserve Bank of New York Staff Reports, no. 346 September 2008

US BROKER-DEALER LIQUIDITY IN THE TIME OF FINANCIAL CRISIS

https://www.shearman.com/perspectives/2020/05/us-broker-dealer-liquidity-in-the-time-of-financial-crisis

Unconventional monetary policy and funding liquidity risk

ECB

Structural developments in global financial intermediation

The rise of debt and non-bank credit intermediation

by

Robert Patalano and Caroline Roulet*

OECD

https://www.oecd-ilibrary.org/finance-and-investment/structural-developments-in-global-financial-intermediation-the-rise-of-debt-and-non-bank-credit-intermediation_daa87f13-en

Financial Stability Review, May 2020

ECB

https://www.ecb.europa.eu/pub/financial-stability/fsr/html/ecb.fsr202005~1b75555f66.en.html#toc1

Structural changes in banking after the crisis

Report prepared by a Working Group established by the Committee on the Global Financial System

The Group was chaired by Claudia Buch (Deutsche Bundesbank) and B Gerard Dages (Federal Reserve Bank of New York)

January 2018

BIS

BANK-BASED OR MARKET-BASED FINANCIAL SYSTEMS: WHICH IS BETTER?

Ross Levine

Working Paper 9138 http://www.nber.org/papers/w9138

NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
September 2002

Non-bank finance: trends and challenges

Financial Stability Review

Bank of France

2018

The Origins of Bank-Based and Market-Based Financial Systems: Germany, Japan, and the United States

Sigurt Vitols*

January 2001

Financial Stability Report

August 2020

Bank of England

Market-Based Finance:
Its Contributions and Emerging Issues

May 2016

Financial Conduct Authority

Bank-Based Versus Market-Based Financing: Implications for Systemic Risk

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/322088863_Bank-Based_Versus_Market-Based_Financing_Implications_for_Systemic_Risk

Off the radar: The rise of shadow banking in Europe 

Martin Hodula  

16 March 2020

https://voxeu.org/article/radar-rise-shadow-banking-europe

Global Monitoring Report on Non-Bank Financial Intermediation 2019

2020

FSB

https://www.fsb.org/2020/01/global-monitoring-report-on-non-bank-financial-intermediation-2019/

Global Monitoring Report on Non-Bank Financial Intermediation 2018

FSB 2019

https://www.fsb.org/2019/02/global-monitoring-report-on-non-bank-financial-intermediation-2018/

Global Shadow Banking Monitoring Report 2017

FSB 2018

https://www.fsb.org/2018/03/global-shadow-banking-monitoring-report-2017/

Global Shadow Banking Monitoring Report 2016

10 May 2017

FSB 2015 Report

FSB 2014 Report

https://www.fsb.org/wp-content/uploads/r_141030.pdf?page_moved=1

FSB 2013 Report

FSB 2012 Report

FSB 2011 Report

Shadow Banking: Monitoring Vulnerabilities and Strengthening Policy Tools

https://www.garp.org/#!/risk-intelligence/all/all/a1Z1W0000054xEzUAI

BANK-BASED AND MARKET-BASED FINANCIAL SYSTEMS: CROSS-COUNTRY COMPARISONS

Asli Demirguc-Kunt and Ross Levine*

June 1999

https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/18e5/660bef2325f326bb8077bd0dd6f5225b1bf8.pdf?_ga=2.215410079.942675951.1605328042-1052966156.1604782392

Off the Radar: Exploring the Rise of Shadow Banking in the EU

Martin Hodula

https://www.cnb.cz/en/economic-research/research-publications/cnb-working-paper-series/Off-the-Radar-Exploring-the-Rise-of-Shadow-Banking-in-the-EU/

https://voxeu.org/article/radar-rise-shadow-banking-europe

Shadow Banking: Economics and Policy

Stijn Claessens, Zoltan Pozsar, Lev Ratnovski, and Manmohan Singh

IMF

2012

https://www.imf.org/en/Publications/Staff-Discussion-Notes/Issues/2016/12/31/Shadow-Banking-Economics-and-Policy-40132

Bank-Based and Market-Based Financial Systems: Cross-Country Comparisons

A. Demirguc-Kunt

Published 1999

https://www.semanticscholar.org/paper/Bank-Based-and-Market-Based-Financial-Systems%3A-Demirguc-Kunt/cd8cf558db2f8404271050ba40408a28ac4fcbc4

Market-based finance: a macroprudential view

Speech given by
Sir Jon Cunliffe, Deputy Governor Financial Stability, Member of the Monetary Policy Committee, Member of the Financial Policy Committee and Member of the Prudential Regulation Committee

BOE/BIS

Asset Management Derivatives Forum, Dana Point, California Friday 9 February 2017

Shadow Banking and Market Based Finance

Tobias Adrian, International Monetary Fund 
Helsinki

September 14, 2017

https://www.imf.org/en/News/Articles/2017/09/13/sp091417-shadow-banking-and-market-based-finance

Transforming Shadow Banking into Resilient Market-based Finance

An Overview of Progress

12 November 2015

FSB

Mapping Market-Based Finance in Ireland

Simone Cima, Neill Killeen and Vasileios Madouros1,2 

Central Bank of Ireland
December 13, 2019

BANK AND NONBANK LENDING OVER THE PAST 70 YEARS

FDIC

Financial Stability Review

November 2019

ECB

Shadow Banking

Zoltan Pozsar, Tobias Adrian, Adam Ashcraft, and Hayley Boesky

FRBNY Economic Policy Review / December 2013

https://www.newyorkfed.org/research/epr/2013/0713adri.html

Shadow Banking and Market-Based Finance

Tobias Adrian and Bradley Jones

IMF

No 18/14

Why Shadow Banking Is Bigger Than Ever

DANIELA GABOR

https://jacobinmag.com/2018/11/why-shadow-banking-is-bigger-than-ever

The Non-Bank Credit Cycle

Esti Kemp, Ren ́e van Stralen, Alexandros P. Vardoulakis, and Peter Wierts

2018-076

Fed Reserve

The role of financial markets for economic growth

Speech delivered by Dr. Willem F. Duisenberg, President of the European Central Bank, at the Economics Conference “The Single Financial Market: Two Years into EMU” organised by the Oesterreichische Nationalbank in Vienna on 31 May 2001

https://www.ecb.europa.eu/press/key/date/2001/html/sp010531.en.html

Bank deleveraging, the move from bank to market-based financing, and SME financing

Gert Wehinger

OECD

OECD Journal: Financial Market Trends Volume 2012/1
© OECD 2012

Shadow Banking: A Review of the Literature

Tobias Adrian Adam B. Ashcraft

2012 FRBNY

The Global Pandemic and Run on Shadow Banks

FRBKC

2020

https://www.kansascityfed.org/en/publications/research/eb/articles/2020/global-pandemic-run-shadow-banks

Shadow Banking: The Rise, Risks, and Rewards of Non-Bank Financial Services

Roy J. Girasa

The Macroeconomics of Shadow Banking

ALAN MOREIRA and ALEXI SAVOV∗

THE JOURNAL OF FINANCE • 2017

Is Shadow Banking Really Banking?

Bryan J. Noeth ,  Rajdeep Sengupta

Saturday, October 1, 2011

FRBSL

https://www.stlouisfed.org/publications/regional-economist/october-2011/is-shadow-banking-really-banking

Three Essays on Capital Regulations and Shadow Banking

Diny Ghuzini
Western Michigan University, diny.ghuzini@wmich.edu

CLARIFYING THE SHADOW BANKING DEBATE: APPLICATION AND POLICY IMPLICATIONS

Amias Gerety 2017

Institute of International Economic Law Georgetown University Law Center

Commercial Banking and Shadow Banking

The Accelerating Integration of Banks and Markets and its Implications for Regulation

ARNOUD W. A. BOOT AND ANJAN V. THAKOR

(prepared as revised version of Chapter 3 in The Oxford University Press Handbook, The Accelerating Integration of Banks and Markets and its Implications for Regulation, 3rd edition.)

The Shadow Banking System in the United States: Recent Developments and Economic Role

Tresor Economics

France

2013

https://www.tresor.economie.gouv.fr/Articles/ccfd4180-fddb-4333-bd16-0b91f2daa18c/files/6ae6455a-92be-43a5-a94d-91b03b38a8d8

Shadow Banking: Policy Challenges for Central Banks

Thorvald Grung Moe*

Levy Economics Institute of Bard College

May 2014

BANKS, SHADOW BANKING, AND FRAGILITY

Stephan Luck and Paul Schempp

2014 ECB

Restructuring the Banking System to Improve Safety and Soundness

Thomas M. Hoenig
Vice Chairman of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation

Charles S. Morris
Vice President and Economist Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City

Original version: May 2011 Revised: December 2012

Understanding the Risks Inherent in Shadow Banking: A Primer and Practical Lessons Learned

by David Luttrell Harvey Rosenblum and Jackson Thies

FRB Dallas

Shadow Banking Concerns: The Case of Money Market Funds

Saad Alnahedh† , Sanjai Bhagat

Towards a theory of shadow money

Daniela Gabor* and Jakob Vestergaard

The Economics of Shadow Banking 

Manmohan Singh

2013

Regulating the Shadow Banking System

GARY GORTON

ANDREW METRICK

Yale University

The Rise of Shadow Banking: Evidence from Capital Regulation

Rustom M. Irani, Raymakal Iyer, Ralf R. Meisenzahl, and Jos ́e-Luis Peydr ́o

2018-039

Fed Reserve

Shadow Banking: Background and Policy Issues

Edward V. Murphy

Specialist in Financial Economics

December 31, 2013

Shining a Light on Shadow Banking

The Clearing House

https://www.theclearinghouse.org/banking-perspectives/2015/2015-q4-banking-perspectives/articles/shining-a-light-on-shadow-banking

REGULATING SHADOW BANKING*

STEVEN L. SCHWARCZ

2011

Duke Law

Money Creation and the Shadow Banking System Adi Sunderam

Harvard Business School and NBER September 2014

https://dash.harvard.edu/bitstream/handle/1/27336543/sunderam_money-creation.pdf?sequence=1

Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission Report Chapter 2

Shadow Banking

THE SHADOW BANKING CHARADE

By Melanie L. Fein*

February 15, 2013

Assessing shadow banking – non-bank financial intermediation in Europe

No 10/ July 2016

by
Laurent Grillet-Aubert Jean-Baptiste Haquin Clive Jackson
Neill Killeen
Christian Weistroffer

ESRB

Shedding Light on Shadow Banking

Timothy Lane

Bank of Canada

shadow banking and capital markets

RISKS AND OPPORTUNITIES

Group of Thirty

Shadow Banking and Market Based Finance

Tobias Adrian, International Monetary Fund 
Helsinki

September 14, 2017

https://www.imf.org/en/News/Articles/2017/09/13/sp091417-shadow-banking-and-market-based-finance

Financial Stability Report – November 2020

Federal Reserve

https://www.federalreserve.gov/publications/2020-november-financial-stability-report-purpose.htm

https://www.federalreserve.gov/publications/2019-november-financial-stability-report-purpose.htm

https://www.federalreserve.gov/publications/2018-november-financial-stability-report-purpose.htm

https://www.federalreserve.gov/publications/financial-stability-report.htm

Funding Sources and Liquidity for US Commercial Banks

Funding Sources and Liquidity for US Commercial Banks

Funding Types

  • Secured
  • Unsecured
  • Short Term
  • Long Term
  • Domestic
  • Foreign

Image Source: THE DARK SIDE OF BANK WHOLESALE FUNDING

Image Source: WHOLESALE FUNDING OF THE BIG SIX CANADIAN BANKS

Canadian Banks Funding Types

Canadian Banks Funding Instruments

MAPPING U.S. DOLLAR FUNDING FLOWS

US Dollar Funding Sources and Instruments
  • Interbank Funding Market
  • Money Market Mutual Funds Market
  • Repo Market
  • Fed Funds Market
  • Commercial Paper Market
  • Asset Backed Commercial Paper Market
  • Certificate of Deposits
  • Auction Rate Securities
  • Bilateral and Tri Party Repos
  • GSEs
  • GSE Mortgage Pools
  • Finance Companies
  • Broker Dealers
  • ABS Insurers

Major Trends prior to Global Financial Crisis of 2008

  • Decline of Banks and Growth of Mutual Funds
  • Rise of Market Based Finance (Non Bank Finance, Shadow Banking)
  • Globalization of Financial Intermediation
  • Rise of Repo Market
  • Securitization

Please see detailed discussion in this reference from which I have used most of the charts.

Economic Policy Review

Federal Reserve Bank New York

Special Issue: The Stability of Funding Models, Feb 2014

Decline of Banks and Growth of Mutual Funds

Rise of MArket based Finance

Also, known as Non Bank Finance, Shadow Banking

Globalization of Financial Intermediation

Rise of Repo Market

Securitization

How did Central Banks respended during the crisis?

Central Bank Backstops During Financial Crisis

During financial crisis, US Federal Reserve has provided emergency liquidity facilities for markets in which liquidity dried up.

  • AMLF Asset Back Comercial Papers Funding Facility
  • MMLF Money MArket Mutual Funds Funding Facility
  • CPFF Commercial Paper Funding Facility

Macro Prudential Policies and Regulations

For financial stability

Some of the important policies that aim at promoting stability are as follows:

  • deposit insurance
  • lender of last resort
  • supervision
  • capital requirements
  • reserve requirements
  • liquidity requirements
  • transparency and disclosure requirements

Key Terms

  • Market based Finance
  • Shadow Banking
  • Funding LIquidity
  • Funding Sources
  • Funding Instruments
  • Bank Liabilities
  • Interlinked Balance sheets
  • Interconnectivity
  • Balance Sheet Expansion
  • Money Flows
  • Systemic Risk
  • Financial Contagion
  • Capital Requirements
  • BASEL III
  • LCR Liquidity Coverage Ratio
  • Money Market Mutual Funds MMMF
  • Asset Backed Commercial Paper ABCP
  • Commercial Paper CP
  • Repurchase Agreements REPOs
  • Fed Funds
  • Interbank Funds
  • Exposure
  • Spillover
  • Counterparties
  • Cross Border Claims
  • Quadruple accounting

My related Posts

Funding Strategies of Banks

Shadow Banking

The Dollar Shortage, Again! in International Wholesale Money Markets

Low Interest Rates and International Capital Flows

Balance Sheets, Financial Interconnectedness, and Financial Stability – G20 Data Gaps Initiative

Contagion in Financial (Balance sheets) Networks

Economics of Money, Credit and Debt

Trends in Assets and Liabilities of Commercial Banks in the USA

Low Interest Rates and Banks’ Profitability – Update October 2020

Key Sources of Research

US dollar funding markets during the Covid-19 crisis – the money market fund turmoil

12 May 2020

BIS

Mapping U.S. Dollar Funding Flows

This interactive map shows how various institutions generally engage with one another, and the Federal Reserve’s balance sheet, in the course of borrowing and lending U.S. dollar instruments in the money markets.

https://www.newyorkfed.org/research/blog/2019_LSE_Markets_Interactive_afonso

Recent stress in money market funds has exposed potential risks for the wider financial system

Prepared by Miguel Boucinha, Laura Capotă, Katharina Cera, Emmanuel Faïk, Jean-Baptiste Galléty, Margherita Giuzio, Maciej Grodzicki, Isabel Kerner, Simon Kördel, Luis Molestina Vivar, Giulio Nicoletti, Ellen Ryan and Christian Weistroffer

Published as part of Financial Stability Review, May 2020.

https://www.ecb.europa.eu/pub/financial-stability/fsr/focus/2020/html/ecb.fsrbox202005_07~725c8a7ec8.en.html

The circular flow of dollars in the world financial markets

Kashi NathTiwari

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/104402839090012C

The Euro-dollar market as a source of United States bank liquidity

Steve B. Steib

Iowa State University

Shadow Banking: The Money View

Zoltan Pozsar

Key Information on the Money Market Mutual Fund Liquidity Facility (MMLF)

https://www.bostonfed.org/news-and-events/news/2020/03/key-information-money-market-mutual-fund-liquidity-facility.aspx

https://www.federalreserve.gov/monetarypolicy/mmlf.htm

Managing the Liquidity Crisis

April 09, 2020

https://hbr.org/2020/04/managing-the-liquidity-crisis

Financial Stability Report

May 2020

Financial Stability Board

FED Reserve

Interbank lending market

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interbank_lending_market

Liquidity Risk and Credit in the Financial Crisis

BY PHILIP E. STRAHAN

FRBSF ECONOMIC LETTER

2012

The Money Market Mutual Fund Liquidity Facility

Marco Cipriani, Gabriele La Spada, Reed Orchinik, and Aaron Plesset

2020

https://libertystreeteconomics.newyorkfed.org/2020/05/the-money-market-mutual-fund-liquidity-facility.html

US money market funds and US dollar funding

Céline Choulet

BNP Paribas

2018

The Dark Side of Bank Wholesale Funding

Rocco Huang

Philadelphia Fed

Lev Ratnovski

Bank of England

A Macroeconomic Model of Liquidity, Wholesale Funding and Banking Regulation

Corinne Dubois* Luisa Lambertini􏰀

The Effect of Monetary Policy on Bank Wholesale Funding

Dong Beom Choi (Federal Reserve Bank of New York)

Hyun-Soo Choi (Singapore Management University)

Between deluge and drought: The future of US bank liquidity and funding

Rebalancing the balance sheet during turbulent times

Kevin Buehler Peter Noteboom Dan Williams

July 2013
McKinsey & Company

https://www.mckinsey.com/~/media/mckinsey/dotcom/client_service/Risk/Working%20papers/48_Future%20of%20US%20funding.ashx

Can Banks Provide Liquidity in a Financial Crisis?

By Nada Mora

How important was the worldwide use of wholesale funds for the international transmission of the US subprime crisis? 

Claudio Raddatz  15 March 2010

https://voxeu.org/article/how-bank-credit-market-funding-helped-spread-global-crisis

The Role of Liquidity in the Financial System

Notes from the Vault

Larry D. Wall
November 2015

https://www.frbatlanta.org/cenfis/publications/notesfromthevault/1511

Global Banks, Dollar Funding, and Regulation

by Iñaki Aldasoro, Torsten Ehlers and Egemen Eren

Monetary and Economic Department March 2018, revised May 2019

Global Monitoring Report on
Non-Bank Financial Intermediation 2019 

19 January 2020

Bank Financing: The Disappearance of Interbank Lending

March 05, 2018

https://www.moneyandbanking.com/commentary/2018/3/4/bank-financing-the-disappearance-of-interbank-lending

Liquidity Risk and Funding Cost

Taking Market-Based Finance Out of the Shadows

Distinguishing Market-Based Finance from Shadow Banking

2018

Blackrock

Wholesale Funding of the Big Six Canadian Banks

Matthieu Truno, Andriy Stolyarov, Danny Auger and Michel Assaf, Financial Markets Department

Bank of Canada Review

Liquidity Risk after the Crisis 

By Allan M. Malz

https://www.cato.org/cato-journal/winter-2018/liquidity-risk-after-crisis

Global Shadow Banking Monitoring Report 2017

5 March 2018

The Federal Funds Market since the Financial Crisis

https://www.clevelandfed.org/en/newsroom-and-events/publications/economic-commentary/2017-economic-commentaries/ec-201707-the-federal-funds-market-since-the-financial-crisis.aspx

Funding liquidity regulation

Allan M. Malz

The Asset-Backed Commercial Paper Money Market Mutual Fund Liquidity Facility (AMLF)

Rosalind Z. Wiggins2,
Yale Program on Financial Stability Case Study

May 9, 2017, revised: October 10, 2020

Liquidity Risk and Credit in the Financial Crisis

BY PHILIP E. STRAHAN

Economic Policy Review

February 2014 Volume 20 Number 1

Special Issue: The Stability of Funding Models

Trends in Assets and Liabilities of Commercial Banks in the USA

Trends in Assets and Liabilities of Commercial Banks in the USA

To big to fail means too interconnected to fail.
As the balance sheets of banks have expanded so has their number of counterparties on both sides of balance sheets.

The US commercial banks have have expanded their balance sheets.

On assets side, the loans portfolio has expanded.

Low Interest Rates and Banks’ Profitability – Update October 2020

On liabilities side, the deposits and borrowings have increased.

US Federal Reserve publishes H8 report on Assets and Liabilities of the US commercial banks. Detailed information on aggregate data presented in this post can be obtained from it.

https://www.federalreserve.gov/releases/h8/h8notes.htm

On liabilities side, the borrowings from wholesale money markets and shadow banking contributed to systemic risk during 2008 financial crisis. Please see my posts on this subject.

Funding Strategies of Banks

Shadow Banking

There were also capital flows in US markets from foreign banks and other markets.

Low Interest Rates and International Capital Flows

On liabilities side, because of increased borrowings from short term markets, the financial interconnections have also increased resulting in systemic risk and financial contagion.

On assets side, because of increased volumes of loan portfolios, the systemic risk and chances for financial contagion have increased.

Balance Sheets, Financial Interconnectedness, and Financial Stability – G20 Data Gaps Initiative

Contagion in Financial (Balance sheets) Networks

For analytical framework, accounting approach (Post Keynesian Economics) is one of the option.

Balance Sheet Economics – Financial Input-Output Analysis (using Asset Liability Matrices) – Update March 2018

Foundations of Balance Sheet Economics

Economics of Money, Credit and Debt

Morris Copeland and Flow of Funds accounts

Stock-Flow Consistent Modeling

Key Terms

  • Money View
  • Money Flows
  • Stocks and Flows
  • System Dynamics
  • Business Dynamics
  • Business Strategy
  • Asset Liability Management ALM
  • Balance Sheet Economics
  • Monetary Policy
  • Interest Rates
  • Credit
  • Debt
  • Money
  • Balance Sheet Expansion
  • Systemic Risk
  • Interconnectivity
  • Loan Portfolio
  • To big to fail
  • Networks
  • Funding Strategy
  • Market Liquidity
  • Funding Liquidity
  • Deposits
  • Interest Income
  • Non Interest Income
  • Borrowings
  • Wholesale Money Markets
  • Shadow Banking
  • International Capital Flows
  • Round Tripping
  • Global Liquidity
  • Eurodollar Market
  • Money Market Mutual Funds
  • Quadruple Accounting
  • Morris Copeland
  • Hyman Minsky
  • Wynn Godley
  • Perry Mehrling

Image Source: Liberty Street Economics 2017

AVERAGE NET INTEREST MARGIN OF BANKS IN THE UNITED STATES FROM 1995 TO 2019
Image Source: Statista

NET INTEREST MARGIN FOR ALL U.S. BANKS (USNIM)
Image Source: FRED

Total Assets, All Commercial Banks (TLAACBW027SBOG)
Image Source: FRED

Total Liabilities, All Commercial Banks (TLBACBW027NBOG)
Image Source: FRED

DEPOSITS, ALL COMMERCIAL BANKS (DPSACBW027SBOG)
Image Source: FRED

My Related Posts

Balance Sheet Economics – Financial Input-Output Analysis (using Asset Liability Matrices) – Update March 2018

Foundations of Balance Sheet Economics

Balance Sheets, Financial Interconnectedness, and Financial Stability – G20 Data Gaps Initiative

Funding Strategies of Banks

Economics of Money, Credit and Debt

Low Interest Rates and International Capital Flows

Low Interest Rates and Banks’ Profitability – Update October 2020

Morris Copeland and Flow of Funds accounts

Key Sources of Research

Deposits, All Commercial Banks (DPSACBW027SBOG)

https://fred.stlouisfed.org/series/DPSACBW027SBOG

Total Liabilities, All Commercial Banks (TLBACBW027NBOG)

https://fred.stlouisfed.org/series/TLBACBW027NBOG

TOTAL ASSETS, ALL COMMERCIAL BANKS (TLAACBW027SBOG)

https://fred.stlouisfed.org/series/TLAACBW027SBOG

Between deluge and drought:
The future of US bank liquidity and funding

Rebalancing the balance sheet during turbulent times

McKinsey

2013

https://www.mckinsey.com/~/media/mckinsey/dotcom/client_service/Risk/Working%20papers/48_Future%20of%20US%20funding.ashx

Assets and Liabilities of Commercial Banks in the United States – H.8

https://www.federalreserve.gov/releases/h8/h8notes.htm

The geography of dollar funding of non-US banks1

Increasing Market Concentration in USA: Update April 2019

Increasing Market Concentration in USA: Update April 2019

In this post, I have compiled recent articles and papers on the issues of:

  • Increased Market Power
  • Increased Market Concentration
  • Increased Corporate Profits
  • Increased Inequality
  • Anti Trust Laws and Competition policy
  • Interest rates and Business Investments
  • Interest rates and Mergers and Acquisitions
  • Stock Buybacks, Dividends, and Business Investments
  • Outsourcing, and Global Value Chains
  • Corporate Savings Glut
  • Slower Economic Growth
  • Reduced Dynamism

 

From Low Interest Rates, Market Power, and Productivity Growth

How does the production side of the economy respond to a low interest rate environment? This study provides a new theoretical result that low interest rates encourage market concentration by giving industry leaders a strategic advantage over followers, and this effect strengthens as the interest rate approaches zero. The model provides a unified explanation for why the fall in long-term interest rates has been associated with rising market concentration, reduced dynamism, a widening productivity-gap between industry leaders and followers, and slower productivity growth. Support for the model’s key mechanism is established by showing that a decline in the ten year Treasury yield generates positive excess returns for industry leaders, and the magnitude of the excess returns rises as the Treasury yield approaches zero.

Please see my related posts:

 

Competition, Concentration, and Anti-Trust Laws in the USA

Concentration, Investment, and Growth

Shareholder Capitalism: Rising Market Concentration, Slower Productivity Growth, Rising Inequality, Rising Profits, and Rising Equities Markets

Rising Market Concentration and Declining Business Investments in the USA – Update June 2018

Rising Profits, Rising Inequality, and Rising Industry Concentration in the USA

Why are Macro-economic Growth Forecasts so wrong?

Low Interest Rates and Business Investments : Update August 2017

Mergers and Acquisitions – Long Term Trends and Waves

Business Investments and Low Interest Rates

Economic Growth Theories – Orthodox and Heterodox

The Decline in Long Term Real Interest Rates

Why do Firms buyback their Shares? Causes and Consequences.

On Inequality of Wealth and Income – Causes and Consequences

Intra Industry Trade and International Production and Distribution Networks

FDI vs Outsourcing: Extending Boundaries or Extending Network Chains of Firms

Understanding Trade in Intermediate Goods

Trends in Intra Firm Trade of USA

Cash and Investments: Corporate Savings Glut in USA

Key sources:

Markups, Consumption and Market Concentration

American Economic Association

https://www.aeaweb.org/conference/2019/preliminary/814?q=eNqrVipOLS7OzM8LqSxIVbKqhnGVrJQMlWp1lBKLi_OTgRwlHaWS1KJcXAgrJbESKpSZmwphlWWmloO0FxUUgLQagFwwSH9BYjpIBZANXDDjnB7P

AMERICA’S CONCENTRATION CRISIS

AN OPEN MARKETS INSTITUTE REPORT

https://concentrationcrisis.openmarketsinstitute.org

How Low Interest Rates Have Led To Increased Market Concentration

Seeking Alpha

March, 2019

https://seekingalpha.com/article/4245601-low-interest-rates-led-increased-market-concentration

 

Market Concentration Is Threatening the US Economy

https://www.project-syndicate.org/commentary/united-states-economy-rising-market-power-by-joseph-e-stiglitz-2019-03

Concentration increasing?

John Cochrane

2019

https://johnhcochrane.blogspot.com/2019/03/concentration-increasing.html

Industry Concentration in Europe and North America

OECD

2019

Monopolies are the ‘missing piece of the puzzle’ when it comes to analyzing US inequality, investment researchers argue

Barclays Launches New Research Study Analyzing how Market Concentration is Affecting the US Economy

March 26, 2019

DISRUPTION CONCENTRATION AND THE NEW ECONOMY

The Surprising Thing About Market Concentration

by esteban rossi-hansberg, pierre-daniel sarte and nicholas trachter

 

Increased market power: a global problem that needs solving?

January 2019

https://www.oxera.com/agenda/increased-market-power-a-global-problem-that-needs-solving/

Click to access Increased-market-power.pdf

 

 

 

70 Years of US Corporate Profits∗

Simcha Barkai

Seth G. Benzell

April 2018

 

Click to access 2270yearsofuscorporateprofits.pdf

 

 

Low Interest Rates, Market Power, and Productivity Growth

Ernest Liu, Atif Mian, Amir Sufi

January 2019

NBER

https://www.nber.org/papers/w25505

Click to access BFI-MFRI-2019-09.pdf

Chapter 2: The Rise of Corporate Market Power and Its Macroeconomic Effects

World Economic Outlook

April 2019

IMF

https://www.imf.org/en/Publications/WEO/Issues/2019/03/28/world-economic-outlook-april-2019

Outsourcing, Occupational and Industrial Concentration

Nicholas Bloom (Stanford), Audrey Guo (Stanford) and Brian Lucking (Stanford)
November 2018

 

 

 

Diverging Trends in National and Local Concentration∗

Esteban Rossi-Hansberg Pierre-Daniel Sarte

Nicholas Trachter

February 26, 2019

 

Click to access DTNLC.pdf

 

 

 

Macroeconomics and Market Power: Facts, Potential Explanations, and Open Questions

Chad Syverson

January 2019

Brookings

 

Click to access ES_20190116_Syverson-Macro-Micro-Market-Power.pdf

A Theory of Falling Growth and Rising Rents

Author(s): Philippe Aghion, Antonin Bergeaud, Timo Boppart, Peter J. Klenow, and Huiyu Li

March 2019

Fed Reserve San Francisco

https://www.frbsf.org/economic-research/publications/working-papers/2019/11/

Competition and market concentration in the United States

 

December 2018

https://www.tresor.economie.gouv.fr/Articles/bd779c20-ede1-4266-94ee-13eb70d0b882/files/c19bc114-e2ee-4f2e-99a4-6ca645b6f0d5

Concentration, Market Power and Dynamism in the Euro Area

ECB Working Paper No. 2253 (2019); ISBN 978-92-899-3515-9

 

Posted: 26 Mar 2019

https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3360233&download=yes

The Rise of Market Power and the Macroeconomic Implications

Jan De Loecker
Jan Eeckhout
Gabriel Unger
November 22, 2018

 

Click to access RMP.pdf

 

Competition, Concentration, and Anti-Trust Laws in the USA

Competition, Concentration, and Anti-Trust Laws in the USA

 

Currently the US FTC has been having hearings on concentration, competition, and anti-trust laws in the USA.  Several conferences are organized starting with September 2018.  I present links to hearings details and videos of the sessions.  As of now, two hearings have already taken place.  I have given the links to the third hearing below.  Economists Joe Stiglitz and Jason Furman have given speeches and presentations during first and second hearings.

Key Sources of Research:

Hearings on Competition and Consumer Protection in the 21st Century

Hearings on Competition and Consumer Protection in the 21st Century

The Federal Trade Commission will hold a series of public hearings during the fall and winter 2018 examining whether broad-based changes in the economy, evolving business practices, new technologies, or international developments might require adjustments to competition and consumer protection law, enforcement priorities, and policy. The PDF version of this content includes footnotes and sources. All the hearings will be webcast live.

 

https://www.ftc.gov/policy/hearings-competition-consumer-protection

Click to access hearings-announcement_0.pdf

 

 

Hearings on Competition and Consumer Protection in the 21st Century: Opening Session

September 14, 2018

DAVIS POLK

 

Click to access 2018-09-14_hearings_on_competition_consumer_protection_in_21st_century.pdf

 

 

FTC Hearing #1: Competition and Consumer Protection in the 21st Century

Hearing #1 On Competition and Consumer Protection in the 21st Century, September 13-14, 2018

 

https://www.ftc.gov/news-events/events-calendar/2018/09/ftc-hearing-1-competition-consumer-protection-21st-century

Click to access agenda-hearings-georgetown_3.pdf

https://www.ftc.gov/news-events/audio-video/video/competition-consumer-protection-21st-century-welcome-session-1

https://www.ftc.gov/news-events/audio-video/video/competition-consumer-protection-21st-century-welcome-session-2

https://www.ftc.gov/news-events/audio-video/video/competition-consumer-protection-21st-century-welcome-session-3

 

 

 

 

FTC Hearing #2: Competition and Consumer Protection in the 21st Century

FTC Hearing #2: Competition and Consumer Protection in the 21st Century

 

https://www.ftc.gov/news-events/press-releases/2018/09/ftc-announces-second-session-hearings-competition-consumer

Click to access hearings-agenda-cc-sept_0.pdf

https://www.ftc.gov/news-events/audio-video/video/ftc-hearing-2-competition-consumer-protection-21st-century-state-us-0

https://www.ftc.gov/news-events/audio-video/video/ftc-hearing-2-competition-consumer-protection-21st-century-state-us

https://www.ftc.gov/news-events/audio-video/video/ftc-hearing-2-competition-consumer-protection-21st-century-monopsony

 

FTC Hearing #3: Competition and Consumer Protection in the 21st Century

FTC Hearing #3: Competition and Consumer Protection in the 21st Century - George Mason University

 

https://www.ftc.gov/news-events/events-calendar/2018/10/ftc-hearing-3-competition-consumer-protection-21st-century

 https://www.ftc.gov/system/files/documents/public_events/1413712/hearings-agenda-gmu_5.pdf

THE UNITED STATES HAS A MARKET CONCENTRATION PROBLEM

REVIEWING CONCENTRATION ESTIMATES IN ANTITRUST MARKETS, 2000-PRESENT

 

ISSUE BRIEF BY ADIL ABDELA AND MARSHALL STEINBAUM

SEPTEMBER 2018

 

Click to access ftc-2018-0074-d-0042-155544.pdf

 

Nobel Prize-winning economist Joseph Stiglitz says the US has a major monopoly problem

https://www.businessinsider.com/joseph-stiglitz-says-the-us-has-a-major-monopoly-problem-2018-9

 

 

Competition Conference 2018

What’s the Evidence for Strengthening Competition Policy?

Boston University

http://sites.bu.edu/tpri/news-and-events/competition-conference-2018/

http://sites.bu.edu/tpri/competition-conference-2018-program-and-papers/

 

Slower Productivity and Higher Inequality: Are They Related?

Jason Furman and Peter Orszag

June 2018

 

Click to access wp18-4.pdf

 

 

 

Market Power and Monetary Policy

Speech given by

Andrew G Haldane Chief Economist Bank of England

Co-authors: Tommaso Aquilante, Shiv Chowla, Nikola Dacic, Riccardo Masolo, Patrick Schneider, Martin Seneca and Srdan Tatomir.

Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City Economic Policy Symposium Jackson Hole, Wyoming

24 August 2018

 

https://www.bankofengland.co.uk/-/media/boe/files/speech/2018/market-power-and-monetary-policy-speech-by-andy-haldane.pdf?la=en&hash=ECC7B63705847EC5E68DEFC86C56B887B9DBD0CD

The Hidden Geometry of Trade Networks

The Hidden Geometry of Trade Networks

 

From The hidden hyperbolic geometry of international trade: World Trade Atlas 1870–2013

Tradenetwork

 

Key Terms:

  • Trade Networks
  • Complex Networks
  • Preferential Attachment
  • Positive Feedback
  • Fractals
  • Power Laws
  • Hyperbolic Geometry
  • Economic Geography
  • Regional Trading Blocks
  • Bilateral Trade
  • Multilateral Trade
  • Free Trade Agreements
  • Metabolism of a City
  • Metabolism of a Nation
  • Metabolism of the World
  • Industrial Ecology
  • Social Ecology
  • Growth and Form

 

 

From The hidden hyperbolic geometry of international trade: World Trade Atlas 1870–2013

Here, we present the World Trade Atlas 1870–2013, a collection of annual world trade maps in which distance combines economic size and the different dimensions that affect international trade beyond mere geography. Trade distances, based on a gravity model predicting the existence of significant trade channels, are such that the closer countries are in trade space, the greater their chance of becoming connected. The atlas provides us with information regarding the long-term evolution of the international trade system and demonstrates that, in terms of trade, the world is not flat but hyperbolic, as a reflection of its complex architecture. The departure from flatness has been increasing since World War I, meaning that differences in trade distances are growing and trade networks are becoming more hierarchical. Smaller-scale economies are moving away from other countries except for the largest economies; meanwhile those large economies are increasing their chances of becoming connected worldwide. At the same time, Preferential Trade Agreements do not fit in perfectly with natural communities within the trade space and have not necessarily reduced internal trade barriers. We discuss an interpretation in terms of globalization, hierarchization, and localization; three simultaneous forces that shape the international trade system.

From The hidden hyperbolic geometry of international trade: World Trade Atlas 1870–2013

When it comes to international trade, the evidence suggests that we are far from a distance-free world. Distance still matters1 and in many dimensions: cultural, administrative or political, economic, and geographic. This is widely supported by empirical evidence concerning the magnitude of bilateral trade flows. The gravity model of trade2–4, in analogy to Newton’s law of gravitation, accurately predicts that the volume of trade exchanged between two countries increases with their economic sizes and decreases with their geographical separation. The precision of that model improves when it is supplemented with other factors, such as colony–colonizer relationships, a shared common language, or the effects of political borders and a common currency5–7. Despite the success of the gravity model at replicating trade volumes, it performs very poorly at predicting the existence of a trade connection between a given pair of countries8; an obvious limitation that prevents it from explaining the striking regularities observed in the complex architecture of the world trade web9–13. One of the reasons for this flaw is that the gravity model focuses on detached bilateral relationships and so overlooks multilateral trade resistance and other network effects14.

Another drawback of the classical gravity model is that geography is not the only factor that defines distance in international trade. Here, we use a systems approach based on network science methodologies15,16 to propose a gravity model for the existence of significant trade channels between pairs of countries in the world. The gravity model is based on economic sizes and on an effective distance which incorporates different dimensions that affect international trade, not only geography, implicitly encoded on the complex patterns of trade interactions. Our gravity model is based on the connectivity law proposed for complex networks with underlying metric spaces17,18 and it can be represented in a pure geometric approach using a hyperbolic space, which has been conjectured as the natural geometry underlying complex networks19–22. In the hyperbolic trade space, distance combines economic size and effective distance into a sole distance metric, such that the closer countries are in hyperbolic trade space, the greater their chance of becoming connected. We estimate this trade distance from empirical data using adapted statistical inference techniques23,24, which allow us to represent international trade through World Trade Maps (WTMs). These define a coordinate system in which countries are located in relative positions according to the aggregate trade barriers between them. The maps are annual and cover a time span of fourteen decades. The collection as a whole, referred to as the World Trade Atlas 1870–2013, is presented via spatial projections25, Table S5, and trade distance matrices, Table S6. Beyond the obvious advantages of visualization, the World Trade Atlas 1870–2013 significantly increases our understanding of the long-term evolution of the international trade system and helps us to address a number of important and challenging questions. In particular: How far, in terms of trade, have countries traveled in recent history? What role does each country play in the maps and how have those roles evolved over time? Are Preferential Trade Agreements (PTAs) consistent with natural communities as measured by trade distances? Has the formation of PTAs led to lesser or greater barriers to trade within blocs? Is trade distance becoming increasingly irrelevant?

The answers to these questions can be summarized by asserting that, in terms of trade, the world is not flat; it is hyperbolic. Differences in trade distances are growing and becoming more heterogeneous and hierarchical; at the same time as they define natural trade communities—not fully consistent with PTAs. Countries are becoming more interconnected and clustered into hierarchical trade blocs than ever before.

Please see my related posts:

Networks and Hierarchies

Increasing Returns, Path Dependence, Circular and Cumulative Causation in Economics

Relational Turn in Economic Geography

Boundaries and Networks

Multilevel Approach to Research in Organizations

Regional Trading Blocs and Economic Integration

Increasing Returns and Path Dependence in Economics

Growth and Form in Nature: Power Laws and Fractals

Key Sources of Research:

 

The hidden hyperbolic geometry of international trade: World Trade Atlas 1870–2013

Guillermo García-Pérez  Marián Boguñá, Antoine Allard & M. Ángeles Serrano

2016

Click to access srep33441.pdf

 

 

Uncovering the hidden geometry behind metabolic networks

 

Molecular BioSystems · March 2012

 

Click to access 1109.1934.pdf

 

 

The hidden geometry of complex networks

M. ÁNGELES SERRANO

 

Click to access s1_to_pdf.pdf

Click to access Curs_Intro_networks.pdf

 

 

 

Deciphering the global organization of clustering in real complex networks

Pol Colomer-de-Simo ́n1, M. A ́ ngeles Serrano1, Mariano G. Beiro ́2, J. Ignacio Alvarez-Hamelin2 & Maria ́n Bogun ̃a ́1

 

Click to access srep02517.pdf

 

 

 

 

 

Hidden geometric correlations in real multiplex networks

 

Kaj-KoljaKleineberg,1,∗ Mari ́anBogun ̃ ́a,1 M.A ́ngelesSerrano,2,1 andFragkiskosPapadopoulos

Click to access 1601.04071.pdf

 

 

 

 

 

Emergent Hyperbolic Network Geometry

Ginestra Bianconi1 & Christoph Rahmede

 

Click to access srep41974.pdf

 

 

 

 

The geometric nature of weights in real complex networks

 

Antoine Allard1,2, M. A ́ngeles Serrano1,2,3, Guillermo Garc ́ıa-Pe ́rez1,2 & Maria ́n Bogun ̃a ́

Click to access ncomms14103.pdf

 

 

 

Network Geometry and Complexity

Daan Mulder · Ginestra Bianconi

 

Click to access 1711.06290.pdf

 

 

 

Multiscale unfolding of real networks by geometric renormalization

 

Guillermo Garc ́ıa-P ́erez,1,2 Mari ́an Bogun ̃ ́a,1,2 and M. A ́ngeles Serrano

 

Click to access 1706.00394.pdf

 

 

 

Topology of the World Trade Web

Ma A ́ngeles Serrano and Mari ́an Bogun ̃a ́

 

Click to access 0301015.pdf

 

 

Patterns of dominant flows in the world trade web

 

M. A ́ngeles Serrano,1 Mari ́an Bogun ̃ ́a,2 and Alessandro Vespignani3,4

 

Click to access 0704.1225.pdf

 

 

 

 

Clustering and the hyperbolic geometry of complex networks

Elisabetta Candellero and Nikolaos Fountoulakis

 

Click to access paper8waw14.pdf

 

 

 

 

Hyperbolic Geometry of Complex Networks

 

Dmitri Krioukov, Fragkiskos Papadopoulos, Maksim Kitsak, Amin Vahdat, and Mari ́an Boguna

Click to access hyperbolic_geometry_complex.pdf

 

 

 

 

 

On Hyperbolic Geometry Structure of Complex Networks

Wenjie Fang

 

Click to access 531c6644768ad78e86843e297fed442769cb.pdf

 

Stock Flow Consistent Input Output Models (SFCIO)

Stock Flow Consistent Input Output Models (SFCIO)

 

SFCIO  = SFC + IO Models

SFC = Stock Flow Consistent

IO = Input Output

Stock Flow Consistent Input Output Models (SFCIO)

 

Integrating Varieties of Modeling Methods

  • Monetary Input Output Models
  • Physical Input Output Models
  • Stock Flow Consistent Models
  • System Dynamics Models

 

For integrating:

  • Physical Flows (Resources and Products)
  • Monetary Flows

 

 

From Ecological Macroeconomic Models: Assessing Current Developments

 

0

 

 

From A stock-flow-fund ecological macroeconomic model

ecology13

 

 

From Stock-Flow Consistent Input–Output Models as a Bridge
Between Post-Keynesian and Ecological Economics

One effort to explicitly represent the dynamics of debt, finance, and other monetary factors has been the post-Keynesian stock-flow consistent (SFC) approach. At the same time, input–output (IO) models have been widely used to investigate sectoral interdependencies within the real economy, while environmentally extended input–output models have been used to analyze the relationship between the economy and ecological subsystems. However, the role of monetary dynamics has been left relatively unexplored in IO models (Caiani et al., 2014). This paper proposes a synthesis of elements from both SFC and IO models with insights from ecological economics to provide an avenue for investigating the interrelations between the monetary economy and the physical environment.

 

From Stock-Flow Consistent Input–Output Models as a Bridge
Between Post-Keynesian and Ecological Economics

By combining SFC models and IO models, financial flows of funds can be integrated with flows of real goods and services. Lawrence Klein, who developed large scale macroeconomic models typified by the FRB-MIT-Penn model, has noted the natural synergies between the National Income and Product accounts, the IO accounts, and the FF accounts (Klein, 2003). The approach of combining both SFC and IO models with ecological macroeconomics affords one method to unite those accounts, as suggested by Klein, and to simultaneously model monetary flows through the financial system, flows of produced goods and services through the real economy, and flows of physical materials through the natural environment. Models of this type may provide additional tools to aid macro economists, ecological economists, and physicists in the task of understanding the economy and the physical environment as one united and complexly interrelated system, rather than as a colloidal agglomeration of artificially separated analytical domains. These modes of analysis are required to study pressing problems such as climate change, which are neither purely economic, nor purely environmental, nor purely physical, but rather are all of the above (Rezai et al., 2013).

 

 

Please see my related posts:

Accounting For Global Carbon Emission Chains

Stock Flow Consistent Models for Ecological Economics

 

 

 

Key Sources of Research:

 

A stock-flow consistent input–output model with applications to
energy price shocks, interest rates, and heat emissions

Matthew Berg1, Brian Hartley2 and Oliver Richters3

2015

http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1367-2630/17/1/015011/pdf

Stock-Flow Consistent Input–Output Models as a Bridge
Between Post-Keynesian and Ecological Economics

 

Matthew Berg (The New School for Social Research)
Brian Hartley (The New School for Social Research)
Oliver Richters (International Economics, Oldenburg University)

October 7, 2015

Click to access v_2015_10_23_richters.pdf

 

 

 

Integrating Energy Use into Macroeconomic Stock-Flow Consistent Models

Presented by
Oliver Richters

2015

Click to access richters-integrating-energy-use-sfc-models-2015.pdf

 

 

 

The role of money and the financial sector in energy-economy models used for assessing climate and energy policy,

Hector Pollitt & Jean-Francois Mercure

(2018)

Climate Policy, 18:2, 184-197

 

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/14693062.2016.1277685?needAccess=true

 

 

Ecological Macroeconomic Models: Assessing Current Developments

Lukas Hardt a,⁎, Daniel W. O’Neill

2017

 

https://ac.els-cdn.com/S0921800916303202/1-s2.0-S0921800916303202-main.pdf?_tid=4fe094ea-f4d6-4a7e-b7d6-230d3cce6c0e&acdnat=1522699485_1c1d93cd6adda3a829d89b5c8e841d13

 

Ecological macroeconomics: Introduction and review

2016

 

https://ac.els-cdn.com/S0921800915004747/1-s2.0-S0921800915004747-main.pdf?_tid=0cda7488-5f2d-4edf-966e-5b23cb7d43cd&acdnat=1522699625_aaa0756d02319c5ab25e0c1f1d8bf3f1

 

 

 

A stock-flow-fund ecological macroeconomic model

Yannis Dafermos a,⁎, Maria Nikolaidi b, Giorgos Galanis c

2016

 

https://ac.els-cdn.com/S0921800916301343/1-s2.0-S0921800916301343-main.pdf?_tid=932bb9db-d514-47b7-9be4-f345250b3f0d&acdnat=1522699759_7d965a332aad8ec5596fc4b34f22e6ec

 

 

 

Potential Consequences on the Economy of Low or No Growth – Short and Long Term Perspectives

J. Mikael Malmaeus a,⁎, Eva C. Alfredsson

 

https://ac.els-cdn.com/S0921800916300477/1-s2.0-S0921800916300477-main.pdf?_tid=6f5c6223-3f20-4d88-af15-ed8d18eff17a&acdnat=1522699926_1793a74188ac6b373bc1aec837514b30

 

 

Growth, Distribution, and the Environment in a Stock-Flow Consistent Framework∗

Asjad Naqvi†

February 6, 2015

Click to access EcolEcon_WorkingPaper_2015_2.pdf

 

 

 

Foundations for an Ecological Macroeconomics: literature review and model development

Tim Jackson, Ben Drake (SURREY), Peter Victor (York University), Kurt Kratena, Mark Sommer (WIFO)

Click to access WWWforEurope_WPS_no065_MS38.pdf

 

 

 

Towards a Stock-Flow Consistent Ecological Macroeconomics

Authors: Tim Jackson (SURREY), Peter Victor (York University), Ali Asjad Naqvi (WU)

March 2016

Click to access 856194174.pdf

Click to access WWWforEurope_WPS_no114_MS40.pdf

 

Consistency and Stability Analysis of Models of a Monetary Growth Imperative

Oliver Richtersa, Andreas Siemoneitb

a Department of Economics, Carl von Ossietzky University Oldenburg, http://www.oliver-richters.de
b Berlin, http://www.ezienzkritik.de

Click to access 863731139.pdf

 

Measuring Globalization: Global Multi Region Input Output Data Bases (G-MRIO)

Measuring Globalization: Global Multi Region Input Output Data Bases (G-MRIO)

 

A special issue of Economic Systems Research published in 2013 discussed currently available GMRIO data bases.  There are two strands of research in development and use of these databases:

  • Trade flows and global supply chains
  • Environmental Impacts of Economic Growth, Trade and Globalization

 

G-MRIO

  • IDE JETRO Asian IO Tables
  • EORA
  • OECD Inter-Country Input-Output (ICIO) tables
  • GRAM (Global Resource Accounting Model )
  • World Input-Output Database (WIOD).
  • Global Trade Analysis Project (GTAP)
  • EXIOPOL (EXIOBASE)

 

Another recent development is development of Trade in Value added databases analyzing trade flows of intermediate goods and fragmented global supply chains and production networks.  These projects are currently underway at the time of writing of this post.

TIVA Databases

  • NA TiVA Project
  • The OECD-WTO TiVA database
  • APEC TiVA initiative

 

There are also EE- GMRIO (Environmentally extended GMRIO) discussed else where in a related post.

 

GMRIO Databases

 

GRAM

The Global Resource Accounting Model (GRAM) is a multi-regional input-output model (MRIO), which currently distinguishes between 62 countries and one ‘rest of the world’ region and 48 industrial sectors per country or region. The heart of the model is made up of OECD data on bilateral trade flows and input-output tables for 1995 to 2010. Combined with additional data sets, such as CO2 emissions and material extraction, the model enables production-related variables to be attributed to end consumption.

 

 

GLOBAL MULTIREGIONAL INPUT–OUTPUT FRAMEWORKS: AN INTRODUCTION AND OUTLOOK

Arnold Tukker & Erik Dietzenbacher
Published online: 21 Mar 2013
This review is the introduction to a special issue of Economic Systems Research on the topic of global multi regional input–output (GMRIO) tables, models, and analysis. It provides a short historical context of GMRIO development and its applications (many of which deal with environmental extensions) and presents the rationale for the major database projects presented in this special issue. Then the six papers are briefly introduced. This is followed by a concluding comparison of the characteristics of the main GMRIO databases developed thus far and an outlook of potential further developments.

 

COMPILATION AND APPLICATIONS OF IDE-JETRO’S INTERNATIONAL INPUT–OUTPUT TABLES

Bo Meng , Yaxiong Zhang & Satoshi Inomata
Published online: 21 Mar 2013
International input–output (IO) tables are among the most useful tools for economic analysis. Since these tables provide detailed information about international production networks, they have recently attracted considerable attention in research on spatial economics, global value chains, and issues relating to trade in value added. The Institute of Developing Economies at the Japan External Trade Organization (IDE-JETRO) has more than 40 years of experience in the construction and analysis of international IO tables. This paper explains the development of IDE-JETRO’s multi-regional IO projects including the construction of the Asian International Input–Output table and the Transnational Inter regional Input–Output table between China and Japan. To help users understand the features of the tables, this paper also gives examples of their application.

 

 

EXIOPOL – DEVELOPMENT AND ILLUSTRATIVE ANALYSES OF A DETAILED GLOBAL MR EE SUT/IOT

Arnold Tukker , Arjan de Koning , Richard Wood , Troy Hawkins , Stephan Lutter , Jose
Published online: 21 Mar 2013
EXIOPOL (A New Environmental Accounting Framework Using Externality Data and Input–Output Tools for Policy Analysis) was a European Union (EU)-funded project creating a detailed, global, multi regional environmentally extended Supply and Use table (MR EE SUT) of 43 countries, 129 sectors, 80 resources, and 40 emissions. We sourced primary SUT and input–output tables from Eurostat and non-EU statistical offices. We harmonized and detailed them using auxiliary national accounts data and co-efficient matrices. Imports were allocated to countries of exports using United Nations Commodity Trade Statistics Database trade shares. Optimization procedures removed imbalances in these detailing and trade linking steps. Environmental extensions were added from various sources. We calculated the EU footprint of final consumption with resulting MR EE SUT. EU policies focus mainly on energy and carbon footprints. We show that the EU land, water, and material footprint abroad is much more relevant, and should be prioritized in the EU’s environmental product and trade policies.

 

 

A MULTI-REGION INPUT–OUTPUT TABLE BASED ON THE GLOBAL TRADE ANALYSIS PROJECT DATABASE (GTAP-MRIO)

Robbie M. Andrew & Glen P. Peters
Published online: 21 Mar 2013
Understanding the drivers of many environmental problems requires enumerating the global supply chain. Multi-region input–output analysis (MRIOA) is a well-established technique for this purpose, but constructing a multi-region input–output table (MRIOT) can be a formidable challenge. We constructed a large MRIOT using the Global Trade Analysis Project (GTAP) database of harmonised economic, IO, and trade data. We discuss the historical development of the GTAP-MRIO and describe its efficient construction. We provide updated carbon footprint estimates and analyse several issues relevant for MRIO construction and applications. We demonstrate that differences in environmental satellite accounts may be more important than differences in MRIOTs when calculating national carbon footprints. The GTAP-MRIO is a robust global MRIOT and, given its easy availability and implementation, it should allow the widespread application of global MRIOA by a variety of users.

 

 

THE CONSTRUCTION OF WORLD INPUT–OUTPUT TABLES IN THE WIOD PROJECT

Erik Dietzenbacher , Bart Los , Robert Stehrer , Marcel Timmer & Gaaitzen de Vries
Published online: 21 Mar 2013
This article describes the construction of the World Input–Output Tables (WIOTs) that constitute the core of the World Input–Output Database. WIOTs are available for the period 1995–2009 and give the values of transactions among 35 industries in 40 countries plus the ‘Rest of the World’ and from these industries to households, governments and users of capital goods in the same set of countries. The article describes how information from the National Accounts, Supply and Use Tables and International Trade Statistics have been harmonized, reconciled and used for estimation procedures to arrive at a consistent time series of WIOTs.

 

 

BUILDING EORA: A GLOBAL MULTI-REGION INPUT–OUTPUT DATABASE AT HIGH COUNTRY AND SECTOR RESOLUTION

Manfred Lenzen , Daniel Moran , Keiichiro Kanemoto & Arne Geschke
Published online: 21 Mar 2013
There are a number of initiatives aimed at compiling large-scale global multi-region input–output (MRIO) tables complemented with non-monetary information such as on resource flows and environmental burdens. Depending on purpose or application, MRIO construction and usage has been hampered by a lack of geographical and sectoral detail; at the time of writing, the most advanced initiatives opt for a breakdown into at most 129 regions and 120 sectors. Not all existing global MRIO frameworks feature continuous time series, margins and tax sheets, and information on reliability and uncertainty. Despite these potential limitations, constructing a large MRIO requires significant manual labour and many years of time. This paper describes the results from a project aimed at creating an MRIO account that represents all countries at a detailed sectoral level, allows continuous updating, provides information on data reliability, contains table sheets expressed in basic prices as well as all margins and taxes, and contains a historical time series. We achieve these goals through a high level of procedural standardisation, automation, and data organisation.

 

 

POLICY-RELEVANT APPLICATIONS OF ENVIRONMENTALLY EXTENDED MRIO DATABASES – EXPERIENCES FROM THE UK

Thomas Wiedmann & John Barrett
Published online: 21 Mar 2013
The impressive development in global multi-region input–output (IO) databases is accompanied by an increase in applications published in the scientific literature. However, it is not obvious whether the insights gained from these studies have indeed been used in political decision-making. We ask whether and to what extent there is policy uptake of results from environmentally extended multi-region IO (EE-MRIO) models and how it may be improved. We identify unique characteristics of such models not inherent to other approaches. We then present evidence from the UK showing that a policy process around consumption-based accounting for greenhouse gas emissions and resource use has evolved that is based on results from EE-MRIO modelling. This suggests that specific, policy-relevant information that would be impossible to obtain otherwise can be generated with the help of EE-MRIO models. Our analysis is limited to environmental applications of global MRIO models and to government policies in the UK.

 

From GLOBAL MULTIREGIONAL INPUT–OUTPUT FRAMEWORKS: AN INTRODUCTION AND OUTLOOK

GMRIO

 

From POLICY-RELEVANT APPLICATIONS OF ENVIRONMENTALLY EXTENDED MRIO  DATABASES – EXPERIENCES FROM THE UK

GMRIO2

From Economic Systems Research

Volume 26, 2014 – Issue 3: A Comparative Evaluation of Multi-Regional Input-Output Databases

CONVERGENCE BETWEEN THE EORA, WIOD, EXIOBASE, AND OPENEU’S CONSUMPTION-BASED CARBON ACCOUNTS

Daniel Moran & Richard Wood
Published online: 14 Jul 2014

In this paper, we take an overview of several of the biggest independently constructed global multi-regional input–output (MRIO) databases and ask how reliable and consonant these databases are. The key question is whether MRIO accounts are robust enough for setting environmental policies. This paper compares the results of four global MRIOs: Eora, WIOD, EXIOBASE, and the GTAP-based OpenEU databases, and investigates how much each diverges from the multi-model mean. We also use Monte Carlo analysis to conduct sensitivity analysis of the robustness of each accounts’ results and we test to see how much variation in the environmental satellite account, rather than the economic structure itself, causes divergence in results. After harmonising the satellite account, we found that carbon footprint results for most major economies disagree by<10% between MRIOs. Confidence estimates are necessary if MRIO methods and consumption-based accounting are to be used in environmental policy-making at the national level.

COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF MRIO DATABASES

Satoshi Inomata & Anne Owen

Published online: 11 Aug 2014

This editorial is the introduction to a special issue of Economics Systems Research on the topic of intercomparison of multi-regional input–output (MRIO) databases and analyses. It explains the rationale for dedicating an issue of this journal to this area of research. Then the six papers chosen for this issue are introduced. This is followed by a concluding section outlining future directions for developers and users of MRIO databases.

 

Please see my related posts:

Accounting For Global Carbon Emission Chains

Development of Global Trade and Production Accounts: UN SEIGA Initiative

Stock Flow Consistent Models for Ecological Economics

 

 

Key Sources of Research:

 

The World Input‐Output Database (WIOD): Contents, Sources and Methods

Edited by Marcel Timmer (University of Groningen)

With contributions from:
Abdul A. Erumban, Reitze Gouma, Bart Los, Umed Temurshoev and
Gaaitzen J. de Vries (University of Groningen)
Iñaki Arto, Valeria Andreoni Aurélien Genty, Frederik Neuwahl, José
M. Rueda‐Cantuche and Alejandro Villanueva (IPTS)
Joe Francois, Olga Pindyuk, Johannes Pöschl and Robert Stehrer
(WIIW), Gerhard Streicher (WIFO)

April 2012, Version 0.9

Click to access WIOD_sources.pdf

 

 

 

Analyzing Global Value Chains using the World Input-Output
Database

Bart Los (University of Groningen)
with Marcel Timmer (Groningen), Gaaitzen de Vries
(Groningen) and Robert Stehrer (wiiw Vienna)

BBVA Foundation – Ivie Workshop, October 30, 2017, Valencia

Click to access B.-Los.pdf

 

An Overview on the Construction of North American Regional Supply-Use and Input-Output Tables and their Applications in Policy Analysis

Statistics Canada
Anthony Peluso
U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis
Gabriel Medeiros
Jeffrey Young
U.S. International Trade Commission
Ross J. Hallren
Lin Jones
Richard Nugent
Heather Wickramarachi

ECONOMICS WORKING PAPER SERIES
Working Paper 2017-12-A

Click to access na-tiva_white_paper_for_posting_revised_02-20.pdf

 

 

 

 

The Global MRIO Lab – charting the world economy,

Manfred Lenzen, Arne Geschke, Muhammad Daaniyall Abd Rahman, Yanyan
Xiao, Jacob Fry, Rachel Reyes, Erik Dietzenbacher, Satoshi Inomata, Keiichiro Kanemoto, Bart Los, Daniel Moran, Hagen Schulte in den Bäumen, Arnold Tukker, Terrie Walmsley, Thomas Wiedmann, Richard Wood & Norihiko Yamano

(2017)

Economic Systems Research, 29:2, 158-186

Click to access Lenzen%20et%20al._2017_Economic%20Systems%20Research_The%20Global%20MRIO%20Lab–charting%20the%20world%20economy.pdf

 

 

 

 

INPUT–OUTPUT ANALYSIS: THE NEXT 25 YEARS,

Erik Dietzenbacher, Manfred Lenzen, Bart Los, Dabo Guan, Michael L. Lahr,
Ferran Sancho, Sangwon Suh & Cuihong Yang

(2013)

Economic Systems Research, 25:4, 369-389

Click to access Guan-ESR-2013-IO%20next%2025%20years.pdf

 

 

 

OECD Inter-Country Input-Output (ICIO) Tables, 2016 edition

http://www.oecd.org/sti/ind/inter-country-input-output-tables.htm

 

 

Trade in Value Added

OECD

http://www.oecd.org/sti/ind/measuringtradeinvalue-addedanoecd-wtojointinitiative.htm

 

 

 

The Global Resource Accounting Model (GRAM)
a methodological concept paper

Stefan Giljum a, Christian Lutz b, Ariane Jungnitz b

a Sustainable Europe Research Institute (SERI), Vienna, Austria
b Institute for Economic Structures Research (GWS), Osnabrück, Germany

April 2008

Click to access Giljum_et_al_GRAM_concept_paper_final.pdf

 

 

 

POLICY-RELEVANT APPLICATIONS OF
ENVIRONMENTALLY EXTENDED MRIO DATABASES – EXPERIENCES FROM THE UK,

Thomas Wiedmann & John Barrett

(2013):

Economic Systems Research, 25:1, 143-156

Click to access Wiedmann__Barrett_-_2013_-_Policy-relevant_applications_of_evironmentally_extended_MRIO_databases_-_experiences_from_the_UK.pdf

 

 

THE CONSTRUCTION OF WORLD INPUT–OUTPUT TABLES IN THE WIOD PROJECT,

Erik Dietzenbacher , Bart Los , Robert Stehrer , Marcel Timmer & Gaaitzen de
Vries

(2013)

Economic Systems Research, 25:1, 71-98,

Click to access WIOD%20construction.pdf

 

 

System of Environmental-Economic Accounting 2012— Applications and Extensions

http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/documents/3859598/7789413/KS-01-15-797-EN-N.pdf/9404d9b0-5c2d-48c8-b1e9-2632800162e7

 

 

Calculating Trade in Value Added

IMF

Prepared by Aqib Aslam, Natalija Novta, and Fabiano Rodrigues-Bastos1

July 2017

https://www.imf.org/~/media/Files/Publications/WP/2017/wp17178.ashx

 

 

World Input-Output Network

Federica Cerina, Zhen Zhu, Alessandro Chessa and Massimo Riccaboni

July 1, 2015

Click to access 336.pdf

 

 

 

Making Global Value Chain Research More Accessible

Lin Jones, William Powers, and Ravinder Ubee1

U.S. International Trade Commission, Office of Economics

October 21, 2013

Click to access ec201310a.pdf

 

On the Measurement of Upstreamness and Downstreamness in
Global Value Chains

Pol Antras
Harvard University and NBER
Davin Chor
National University of Singapore

October 30, 2017

Click to access upstream_ac_oct30_2017_withtables.pdf

 

 

 

THE OECD INPUT-OUTPUT DATABASE: 2006 EDITION

STI WORKING PAPER 2006/8

Norihiko Yamano and Nadim Ahmad

Click to access OECD%20Input-Output%20Database.pdf

 

 

 

GLOBAL MULTI REGIONAL INPUT–OUTPUT FRAMEWORKS: AN INTRODUCTION AND OUTLOOK,

Arnold Tukker & Erik Dietzenbacher

(2013)

Econ omic Systems Research, 25:1,1-19

Click to access UNSD%20-%20Tukker%20-%20Overview%20on%20International%20IO%20Tables%20-%202013.pdf

 

THE CONSTRUCTION OF WORLD INPUT–OUTPUT TABLES IN THE WIOD PROJECT,

Erik Dietzenbacher , Bart Los , Robert Stehrer , Marcel Timmer & Gaaitzen de
Vries

(2013)

Economic Systems Research, 25:1, 71-98

Click to access WIOD%20construction.pdf

 

 

 

A review of recent multi-region input–output models used for consumption-based
emission and resource accounting

Thomas Wiedmann

2009

http://wedocs.unep.org/bitstream/handle/20.500.11822/19433/a_review.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y

 

 

World Input-Output Network

Federica Cerina, Zhen Zhu, Alessandro Chessa, Massimo Riccaboni

2015

Click to access pone.0134025.pdf

 

 

A Network of Networks Perspective on Global Trade

Julian Maluck, Reik V. Donner

Click to access pone.0133310.pdf

 

 

 

THE ‘REST OF THE WORLD’ – ESTIMATING THE ECONOMIC STRUCTURE OF MISSING REGIONS IN GLOBAL MULTI-REGIONAL INPUT–OUTPUT TABLES,

Konstantin Stadler, Kjartan Steen-Olsen & Richard Wood

(2014)

Economic Systems Research, 26:3, 303-326

Click to access Stadler,%20Steen-olsen,%20Wood_2015_Unknown_the%20‘%20Rest%20of%20the%20World%20’%20–%20Estimating%20the%20Economic%20Structure%20of%20Missing%20Regions%20in%20Global%20Multi.pdf

 

 

“Trade, Environment, and Growth: Advanced topics in Input-Output Analysis”*

Professor: Erik Dietzenbacher (U. Groningen)

March 9-13, 2015

Click to access outline___trade_growth_and_the_environment_.pdf

 

 

 

 

Wassily Leontief and the discovery of the input-output approach

Click to access memo-18-2016-versjon-2.pdf

 

 

Networks of value added trade,

Amador, João; Cabral, Sónia

(2016)

ECB Working Paper, No. 1931, ISBN 978-92-899-2179-4,

Click to access ecbwp1931.pdf

 

EXIOPOL – DEVELOPMENT AND ILLUSTRATIVE ANALYSES OF A DETAILED GLOBAL MR EE SUT/IOT,

Arnold Tukker , Arjan de Koning , Richard Wood , Troy Hawkins , Stephan
Lutter , Jose Acosta , Jose M. Rueda Cantuche , Maaike Bouwmeester , Jan Oosterhaven ,
Thomas Drosdowski & Jeroen Kuenen

(2013)

Economic Systems Research, 25:1,50-70

Click to access Tukker%20et%20al._2013_Economic%20Systems%20Research_Exiopol%20–%20Development%20and%20Illustrative%20Analyses%20of%20a%20Detailed%20Global%20Mr%20Ee%20SutIot.pdf

 

 

 

The World Input-Output Database (WIOD) project

Robert Stehrer

OECD-WPTSG meeting

November 18, 2009 – OECD, Paris

Click to access 44197850.pdf

 

 

The World Input-Output Database (WIOD): Construction, Challenges and Applications

Abdul Azeez Erumbana, Reitze Goumaa, Bart Losa,b, Robert Stehrerc, Umed
Temurshoevb, Marcel Timmer a,b,*, Gaaitzen de Vries

Paper prepared for World Bank workshop
“The Fragmentation of Global Production and Trade in Value Added”,
June 9-10, 2011.

Click to access PAPER_13_Erumban_Gouma_Los_Stehrer_Temurshoev_Timmer_deVries.pdf

 

The World Input-Output Database: Content, Concepts and Applications.

Timmer, M. P., Dietzenbacher, E., Los, B., Stehrer, R., & de Vries, G. J.

(2014).

GGDC Working Papers; Vol. GD-144).

Click to access gd144.pdf

 

 

Measuring Global Value Chains with the WIOD (World Input-Output Database)

Marcel Timmer

Groningen Growth and Development Centre
University of Groningen
(presentation at OECD conference,
Paris, 21 September, 2010)

Click to access 1-3_Timmer.pdf

 

 

 

Global value chains, trade, jobs, and environment: The new WIOD database

Hubert Escaith, Marcel Timmer

13 May 2012

https://voxeu.org/article/new-world-input-output-database

 

Wassily Leontief and the discovery of the input-output approach

Olav Bjerkholt

2016

Click to access 877412162.pdf

 

 

 

WHO PRODUCES FOR WHOM IN THE WORLD ECONOMY?

Guillaume Daudin (Lille-I (EQUIPPE) & Sciences Po (OFCE), Christine Rifflart, Danielle
Schweisguth (Sciences Po (OFCE))1

This version: July 2009

Click to access WP2009-18.pdf

 

 

 

An Anatomy of the Global Trade Slowdown based on the WIOD 2016 Release

Marcel P. Timmer, Bart Los,
Robert Stehrer, and Gaaitzen J. de Vries

December 2016

Click to access gd162.pdf