Water | Food | Energy | Nexus: Mega Trends and Scenarios for the Future

Water | Food | Energy | Nexus: Mega Trends and Scenarios for the Future

 

 

From http://www.unwater.org/water-facts/water-food-and-energy/

Facts and Figures

  • Agriculture accounts for 70% of global water withdrawal. (FAO)
  • Roughly 75% of all industrial water withdrawals are used for energy production. (UNESCO, 2014)
  • The food production and supply chain accounts for about 30% of total global energy consumption. (UNESCO, 2012)
  • 90% of global power generation is water-intensive. (UNESCO, 2014)
  • Global water demand (in terms of water withdrawals) is projected to increase by 55% by 2050, mainly because of growing demands from manufacturing (400% increase). More than 40% of the global population is projected to be living in areas of severe water stress by 2050. (UNESCO, 2014)
  • Power plant cooling is responsible for 43% of total freshwater withdrawals in Europe (more than 50% in several countries), nearly 50% in the United States of America, and more than 10% of the national water cap in China. (UNESCO, 2014)
  • By 2035, water withdrawals for energy production could increase by 20% and consumption by 85%, driven via a shift towards higher efficiency power plants with more advanced cooling systems (that reduce water withdrawals but increase consumption) and increased production of biofuel. (UNESCO, 2014)
  • There is clear evidence that groundwater supplies are diminishing, with an estimated 20% of the world’s aquifers being over-exploited, some critically so. Deterioration of wetlands worldwide is reducing the capacity of ecosystems to purify water. (UNESCO, 2014)
  • It typically takes 3,000 – 5,000 litres of water to produce 1 kg of rice, 2,000 litres for 1kg of soya, 900 litres for 1kg of wheat and 500 litres for 1kg of potatoes. (WWF).
  • While almost 800 million people are currently hungry, by 2050 global food production would need to increase by 50% to feed the more than 9 billion people projected who live on our planet (FAO/IFAD/UNICEF/WFP/WHO, 2017).

 

From Background paper for the Bonn 2011 Nexus Conference: THE WATER, ENERGY AND FOOD SECURITY NEXUS

 

nexus2

 

 

From How Shell, Chevron and Coke tackle the energy-water-food nexus

We know how important food, water and energy are to our daily lives, but what happens when we fail to value them as critical, interconnected resources for our economy?

In the summer of 2012, the U.S. was affected by one of the worst droughts in recent decades. Eighty percent of U.S. farms and ranches were affected, crop losses exceeded $20 billion and unforeseen ripple effects followed.

With corn crops withering from the lack of rainfall, prices for food and livestock feed supplies rose, as did ethanol, predominantly sourced from corn. Numerous power plants had to scale back operations or even shut down because the water temperatures of many rivers, lakes and estuaries had increased to the point where they could not be used for cooling. Household, municipal and farm wells in the Midwest had to be extended deeper into rapidly depleting aquifers to make up for the lack of rainfall, draining groundwater supplies and demanding more electricity to run the pumps. It is estimated that consumers will feel these ripple effects for years to come — over the next year alone, this impact could result in personal costs up to $50 billion.

Now more than ever, our infrastructure is built on an interlinked system for the production and use of energy, water and food. Water is needed for almost all forms of energy production and power generation, energy is required to treat and transport water, and both water and energy are needed to produce food.

This interconnection, or energy-water-food nexus, underscores the global challenges that we face as a society. The growing global population, increased wealth and urbanization will continue to stress energy, water and food supplies. Climate change and unsustainable development practices will exacerbate them. In preparing for a population that could top 10 billion by 2050, according to U.N. estimates, in the next 15 to 20 years alone we will need 30 percent more water, 45 percent more energy and 50 percent more food.

Consvation International’s Business & Sustainability Council (PDF) examined the corporate risk and opportunities related to the energy-water-food nexus. The nexus is still new in the minds of many corporations, but CI sees several examples of companies broadening their strategies to build synergistic solutions.

Shell shines the spotlight on the pressures from the energy-water-food stress nexus in its 2013 report, “The New Lens Scenario.” The company is using scenario planning to test and collaborate on the design of synergistic solutions to tackle these interlinked resource constraints. In British Columbia, Shell collaborated with the city of Dawson Creek to build a reclaimed water facility that virtually eliminated its need to draw on local freshwater sources for the operation of a natural gas venture. It also worked with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development and the University of Utrecht to develop a new methodology that could more accurately estimate the amount of water needed to generate energy from different sources — oil, gas, coal, nuclear and biofuels — using different technologies and in different locations.

In Kern County, about 100 miles from Los Angeles and home to Chevron’s largest California oil field, Chevron partnered with the Cawelo Water District to provide much needed water to local farmers for agricultural use. Water is a significant byproduct from steam flooding, a technology employed to extract thick, viscous oil out of the ground. For every barrel of oil, 10 barrels of water are produced, about 700,000 gallons per day. Chevron reclaims about one-third to generate new steam, and provides most of the remaining treated water to the Cawelo Water District to distribute to 160 farmers to irrigate 45,000 acres of crops, such as almonds, grapes, pistachios and citrus. This innovative solution is critical to creating a more sustainable local water supply and helping Kern County growers keep agriculture thriving in the region.

Since 2005, The Coca-Cola Company has set an ambitious water security commitment for its beverages and operations. In order to meet its goal, it implemented a series of technical and natural solutions in nearly 400 community water projects in more than 90 countries. These community water partnerships include rainwater harvesting, drip irrigation, agricultural water efficiency improvements and protecting watersheds. The company has taken an even broader perspective, enhancing the ability of watersheds to absorb threats associated with the uncertainties around climate change, and increased demands for water, energy and food from a burgeoning population.

Ensuring energy, water and food security on a global level requires equal consideration of the interdependency among all three systems and the underlying natural capital that supports them.

CI believes that addressing the stress nexus requires collaboration among government, business and civil society. Public-private partnerships offer an innovative way to leverage expertise and financing in order to pilot practical, scalable and collaborative solutions. The Sustainable Landscape Partnership being piloted in Indonesia with support from CI, USAID and the Walton Family Foundation looks to understand integrated approaches to build local economies while reducing deforestation and ensuring food and water security.

Lack of data specific to the nexus is currently a limiting factor in building solutions. Improved frameworks to price natural resources such as water will be critical — one reason CI is engaged with WAVES and the TEEB for Business Coalition. CI is also piloting a game-changing monitoring system called Vital Signs in Africa to provide near real-time ecological and social data and diagnostic tools to guide agricultural development decisions and monitor their outcomes. As we continue to pilot models that demonstrate resiliency of landscapes, open platforms for information sharing will generate innovations and efficiencies.

Combined together, this integrated approach will be critical to fully understanding where critical nexus interactions lie, where they are most susceptible and how we can meaningfully make better decisions, for this generation and the next.

 

Please see my related post:

Jay W. Forrester and System Dynamics

Art of Long View: Future, Uncertainty and Scenario Planning

 

 

Key Sources of Research:

 

 

World Water Development Report 2014

UN Water

http://www.unwater.org/publications/world-water-development-report-2014-water-energy/

 

Nexus in the Media

 

https://www.water-energy-food.org/news/media/recent/34/

 

 

Tools and Databases

 

https://www.water-energy-food.org/resources/tools-and-databases/

 

 

 

The Energy-Water-Food Nexus: The Emerging Challenge to Sustainable Prosperity

Forbes

2012

https://www.forbes.com/sites/francisvorhies/2012/09/09/the-energy-water-food-nexus-the-emerging-challenge-to-sustainable-prosperity/#361c315557bd

 

 

 

The Food, Water, Energy Nexus

Published on Thursday, 20 March 2014

 

Asian Development Bank

https://blogs.adb.org/blog/food-water-energy-nexus

 

 

 

How Shell, Chevron and Coke tackle the energy-water-food nexus

https://www.greenbiz.com/blog/2013/10/30/shell-chevron-coke-energy-water-food-nexus

 

 

 

 

Understanding the Stress Nexus

Shell International

http://s06.static-shell.com/content/dam/shell-new/local/country/mex/downloads/pdf/stress-nexus-booklet.pdf

 

 

 

The Energy | Water | Food Nexus

Conservation International

https://www.conservation.org/publications/Documents/BSC_Resources_vol2.pdf

 

 

 

Energy-water-food stress nexus

Royal Geographical Society

Energy-water-food stress nexus

 

 

 

A review of the current state of research on the water, energy, and food nexus

 

2016

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2214581815001251

https://ac.els-cdn.com/S2214581815001251/1-s2.0-S2214581815001251-main.pdf?_tid=08fc48aa-5ee7-4cc9-9858-084df130706e&acdnat=1524697246_c516ec9ea24d602062e2cb262cfbc493

 

 

 

The Water–Energy–Food Security Nexus: Towards a practical planning and decision-support framework for landscape investment and risk management

 

Livia Bizikova
Dimple Roy
Darren Swanson
Henry David Venema
Matthew McCandless

IISD

2013

https://www.iisd.org/sites/default/files/publications/wef_nexus_2013.pdf

 

 

 

 

Tracing the water-energy-food nexus: description, theory and practice.

Leck, Hayley, Conway, Declan, Bradshaw, Michael and Rees, Judith A.

(2015)

Geography Compass, 9 (8). pp. 445-460. ISSN 1749-8198

http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/63385/1/Water_energy_food.pdf

 

 

 

BRIDGING THE WATER AND FOOD GAP: THE ROLE OF THE
WATER-ENERGY-FOOD NEXUS

RABI H. MOHTAR,
AMJAD T. ASSI,
BASSEL T. DAHER

United Nations University

http://collections.unu.edu/eserv/UNU:3235/WorkingPapers_No5.pdf

 

 

 

Tools for analyzing the water-food-energy-ecosystems nexus

Compiled for UNECE by the Energy Systems Analysis group of the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm

September 2015

 

https://www.unece.org/fileadmin/DAM/env/water/nexus/Nexus_tools_final_for_web.pdf

 

 

 

 

Energy -Water-Food Nexus

D.L. Keairns, R.C. Darton, and A. Irabien

 

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/299485820_Energy_-Water-Food_Nexus

 

 

 

 

Understanding the Energy-Water Nexus

Matthew Halstead
Tom Kober
Bob van der Zwaan

September 2014

 

https://www.ecn.nl/docs/library/report/2014/e14046.pdf

 

 

 

 

“Towards sustainable synergy between water, energy and food”

 

https://www.ief.org/_resources/files/events/1st-conference-on-the-water-energy-food-nexus-in-the-gcc-between-saudi-arabia-and-the-netherlands/agenda-and-backgrounds.pdf

 

 

 

 

WATER-ENERGY-FOOD NEXUS FOR THE REVIEW OF SDG 7

UN

2018

https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/content/documents/17483PB_9_Draft.pdf

 

 

 

 

GOVERNANCE IN THE WATER-ENERGY-FOOD NEXUS:
GAPS AND FUTURE RESEARCH NEEDS

Nina Weitz, Claudia Strambo, Eric Kemp-Benedict, Måns Nilsson

SEI

2017

http://aquadoc.typepad.com/files/sei-2017-wp-nexus-governance-weitz-1.pdf

 

 

 

 

Water, Food and Energy

UN

http://www.unwater.org/water-facts/water-food-and-energy/

 

 

 

WATER, FOOD AND ENERGY NEXUS CHALLENGES

 

WBCSD

https://www.gwp.org/globalassets/global/toolbox/references/water-food-and-energy-nexus-challenges-wbcsd-2014.pdf

 

 

 

 

A bottom-up approach to the nexus of energy, food and water security in the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) region

Prof. Subhes Bhattacharyya
Mr. Nicola Bugatti
Mr. Hannes Bauer

2015

http://www.thenexusnetwork.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/Bhattacharyya-thinkpiece_2015.pdf

 

 

 

Understanding the Nexus. Background Paper for the Bonn2011
Conference: The Water, Energy and Food Security Nexus.

Hoff, H.

(2011).

Stockholm Environment Institute, Stockholm.

http://wef-conference.gwsp.org/fileadmin/documents_news/understanding_the_nexus.pdf

 

 

 

Anatomy of a buzzword: the emergence of ‘the
water-energy-food nexus’ in UK natural resource debates

Rose Cairns

Anna Krzywoszynska*

2016

http://eprints.whiterose.ac.uk/103186/1/EnvScPol%20AK%20RC%20nexus.pdf

 

 

 

Understanding the Nexus of Food, Water, and Energy

AT Kearney

http://www.atkearney.com.au/documents/10192/424058/Understanding_the_Nexus_of_Food-Water-and_Energy.pdf/04e49895-077c-4c86-8981-77aa287cb34c

 

 

 

 

A quick scan

Water-food-energy nexus

Stijn Reinhard, Jan Verhagen, Wouter Wolters and Ruerd Ruben

 

https://www.wur.nl/upload_mm/1/6/f/6bec946b-792c-469b-ba07-5eec5c04b563_2017-096%20Reinhard_def.pdf

 

 

 

The Circular Economy and the Water-Energy-Food Nexus

2015

http://www.diss.fu-berlin.de/docs/servlets/MCRFileNodeServlet/FUDOCS_derivate_000000005078/pp715-water-energy-food-nexus.pdf

 

 

 

The global food – water – energy nexus

Rabobank

https://www.rabobank.com/nl/images/20161121-Report_Rabobank.pdf

 

 

 

 

Water Food Energy Climate Nexus

World Economic Forum

2011

http://www3.weforum.org/docs/WEF_WI_WaterSecurity_WaterFoodEnergyClimateNexus_2011.pdf

 

 

 

Development of Pardee Rand Water Energy Food Security Index

RAND

 

https://www.rand.org/content/dam/rand/pubs/tools/TL100/TL165/RAND_TL165.pdf

 

 

 

 

Review of the Current State of Research on the Water, Energy, and
Food Nexus

by
Aiko Endo, Izumi Tsurita, Kimberly Burnett,
And Pedcris M. Orencio

http://uhero.hawaii.edu/assets/WP_2016-7.pdf

 

 

Mitigating Risks and Vulnerabilities in the Energy-Food-Water Nexus in Developing Countries

Sustainability Institute

2015

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/media/57a08972e5274a27b20000ad/61478_EFW-Nexus-final-report-Hyperlinked.pdf

 

 

CARBOHYDRATES, H2O, AND HYDROCARBONS:
GRAIN SUPPLY SECURITY AND THE FOOD-WATERENERGY
NEXUS IN THE ARABIAN GULF REGION

Gabriel Collins, J.D.
Baker Botts Fellow in Energy & Environmental Regulatory Affairs
June 2017

 

https://www.bakerinstitute.org/media/files/files/96136d13/CES-pub-QLC_Nexus-061317.pdf

 

 

 

Managing the food,water,and energy nexus for achieving the
Sustainable Development Goals in South Asia

Golam Rasul

2015

http://www.pmf.unizg.hr/_download/repository/Managing_the_food%2Cwater%2Cand_energy_nexus_for_achieving_the….pdf

 

 

 

The Water-Energy Nexus and Urban Metabolism – Connections in Cities

Steven Kenway

January 2013

http://www.urbanwateralliance.org.au/publications/UWSRA-tr100.pdf

 

 

Thinking about Water Differently
Managing the Water–Food–Energy Nexus

ADB

2013

http://waterfootprint.org/media/downloads/ADB-2013-Thinking-about-water-differently_1.pdf

 

 

 

Walking the Nexus Talk:
Assessing the Water-Energy-Food Nexus
in the Context of the Sustainable Energy for All Initiative

FAO

http://wedocs.unep.org/bitstream/handle/20.500.11822/19556/Walking_the_Nexus_Talk.pdf?sequence=1

 

 

 

 

The 15 projects that will take on the food-water-energy nexus

https://jpi-urbaneurope.eu/news/the-15-projects-that-will-take-on-the-food-water-energy-nexus/

 

 

 

WATER-FOOD-ENERGY NEXUS IN ASIA AND THE PACIFIC

UNESCAP

http://www.unescap.org/sites/default/files/Water-Food-Nexus%20Report.pdf

 

 

 

Food, Water and Energy Nexus in India

 

http://www.un.org/en/ga/second/66/docs/modi.pdf

 

 

 

The Food-Energy-Water Nexus

(GEO/NRSM 595)

University of Montana

https://www.umt.edu/bridges/training/Syllabi/Core%20Course%2017.pdf

 

 

 

Water–food–energy nexus with changing agricultural scenarios in
India during recent decades

Beas Barik1, Subimal Ghosh1,2, A. Saheer Sahana1, Amey Pathak1, and Muddu Sekhar

2017

https://www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/21/3041/2017/hess-21-3041-2017.pdf

 

 

 

 

The Energy–Water–Food Nexus at Decentralized Scales

Lucy Stevens and Mary Gallagher, Practical Action, UK

http://www.idaea.csic.es/medspring/sites/default/files/PPEBP3%2BONLINE.pdf

 

 

 

 

Making governance work for water–energy–food nexus approaches

By Andrew Scott

 

https://cdkn.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/Working-paper_CDKN_Making-governance-work-for-water-energy-food-nexus-approaches.pdf

 

 

 

Food, Water and Energy: Know the Nexus

 

http://waternexussolutions.org/gracelinks.org/media/pdf/knowthenexus_final_051513.pdf

 

 

 

 

Global Trends 2030: Alternative Worlds
a publication of the National Intelligence Council

DNI USA

2013

https://www.dni.gov/files/documents/GlobalTrends_2030.pdf

 

 

 

GLOBAL TRENDS

PARADOX OF PROGRESS
A publication of the National Intelligence Council

2017

https://www.dni.gov/files/documents/nic/GT-Full-Report.pdf

 

 

 

Global Trends

DNI

https://www.dni.gov/index.php/global-trends-home

https://www.dni.gov/index.php/digital-extras/previous-reports

 

 

 

Understanding Water- Energy-
Food Nexus from Mountain Perspective

David Molden, Aditi Mukherji, Golam Rasul, Arun Shrestha,
Ramesh Vaidya, Shahriar M. Wahid and Philippus Wester

http://wef-conference.gwsp.org/uploads/media/C06_Golam.pdf

 

 

 

Regulating the water-energy-food nexus: Interdependencies, transaction costs and procedural justice

 

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1462901117300540

 

 

 

Innovating at the food, water, and energy interface

https://cloudfront.escholarship.org/dist/prd/content/qt7k96k7wf/qt7k96k7wf.pdf

 

 

 

The Water-Energy-Food Nexus. A New Approach in Support of Food Security and Sustainable Agriculture

FAO

http://www.fao.org/policy-support/resources/resources-details/en/c/421718/

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Stock Flow Consistent Input Output Models (SFCIO)

Stock Flow Consistent Input Output Models (SFCIO)

 

SFCIO  = SFC + IO Models

SFC = Stock Flow Consistent

IO = Input Output

Stock Flow Consistent Input Output Models (SFCIO)

 

Integrating Varieties of Modeling Methods

  • Monetary Input Output Models
  • Physical Input Output Models
  • Stock Flow Consistent Models
  • System Dynamics Models

 

For integrating:

  • Physical Flows (Resources and Products)
  • Monetary Flows

 

 

From Ecological Macroeconomic Models: Assessing Current Developments

 

0

 

 

From A stock-flow-fund ecological macroeconomic model

ecology13

 

 

From Stock-Flow Consistent Input–Output Models as a Bridge
Between Post-Keynesian and Ecological Economics

One effort to explicitly represent the dynamics of debt, finance, and other monetary factors has been the post-Keynesian stock-flow consistent (SFC) approach. At the same time, input–output (IO) models have been widely used to investigate sectoral interdependencies within the real economy, while environmentally extended input–output models have been used to analyze the relationship between the economy and ecological subsystems. However, the role of monetary dynamics has been left relatively unexplored in IO models (Caiani et al., 2014). This paper proposes a synthesis of elements from both SFC and IO models with insights from ecological economics to provide an avenue for investigating the interrelations between the monetary economy and the physical environment.

 

From Stock-Flow Consistent Input–Output Models as a Bridge
Between Post-Keynesian and Ecological Economics

By combining SFC models and IO models, financial flows of funds can be integrated with flows of real goods and services. Lawrence Klein, who developed large scale macroeconomic models typified by the FRB-MIT-Penn model, has noted the natural synergies between the National Income and Product accounts, the IO accounts, and the FF accounts (Klein, 2003). The approach of combining both SFC and IO models with ecological macroeconomics affords one method to unite those accounts, as suggested by Klein, and to simultaneously model monetary flows through the financial system, flows of produced goods and services through the real economy, and flows of physical materials through the natural environment. Models of this type may provide additional tools to aid macro economists, ecological economists, and physicists in the task of understanding the economy and the physical environment as one united and complexly interrelated system, rather than as a colloidal agglomeration of artificially separated analytical domains. These modes of analysis are required to study pressing problems such as climate change, which are neither purely economic, nor purely environmental, nor purely physical, but rather are all of the above (Rezai et al., 2013).

 

 

Please see my related posts:

Accounting For Global Carbon Emission Chains

Stock Flow Consistent Models for Ecological Economics

 

 

 

Key Sources of Research:

 

A stock-flow consistent input–output model with applications to
energy price shocks, interest rates, and heat emissions

Matthew Berg1, Brian Hartley2 and Oliver Richters3

2015

http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1367-2630/17/1/015011/pdf

Stock-Flow Consistent Input–Output Models as a Bridge
Between Post-Keynesian and Ecological Economics

 

Matthew Berg (The New School for Social Research)
Brian Hartley (The New School for Social Research)
Oliver Richters (International Economics, Oldenburg University)

October 7, 2015

https://www.boeckler.de/pdf/v_2015_10_23_richters.pdf

 

 

 

Integrating Energy Use into Macroeconomic Stock-Flow Consistent Models

Presented by
Oliver Richters

2015

https://www.econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/154764/1/richters-integrating-energy-use-sfc-models-2015.pdf

 

 

 

The role of money and the financial sector in energy-economy models used for assessing climate and energy policy,

Hector Pollitt & Jean-Francois Mercure

(2018)

Climate Policy, 18:2, 184-197

 

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/14693062.2016.1277685?needAccess=true

 

 

Ecological Macroeconomic Models: Assessing Current Developments

Lukas Hardt a,⁎, Daniel W. O’Neill

2017

 

https://ac.els-cdn.com/S0921800916303202/1-s2.0-S0921800916303202-main.pdf?_tid=4fe094ea-f4d6-4a7e-b7d6-230d3cce6c0e&acdnat=1522699485_1c1d93cd6adda3a829d89b5c8e841d13

 

Ecological macroeconomics: Introduction and review

2016

 

https://ac.els-cdn.com/S0921800915004747/1-s2.0-S0921800915004747-main.pdf?_tid=0cda7488-5f2d-4edf-966e-5b23cb7d43cd&acdnat=1522699625_aaa0756d02319c5ab25e0c1f1d8bf3f1

 

 

 

A stock-flow-fund ecological macroeconomic model

Yannis Dafermos a,⁎, Maria Nikolaidi b, Giorgos Galanis c

2016

 

https://ac.els-cdn.com/S0921800916301343/1-s2.0-S0921800916301343-main.pdf?_tid=932bb9db-d514-47b7-9be4-f345250b3f0d&acdnat=1522699759_7d965a332aad8ec5596fc4b34f22e6ec

 

 

 

Potential Consequences on the Economy of Low or No Growth – Short and Long Term Perspectives

J. Mikael Malmaeus a,⁎, Eva C. Alfredsson

 

https://ac.els-cdn.com/S0921800916300477/1-s2.0-S0921800916300477-main.pdf?_tid=6f5c6223-3f20-4d88-af15-ed8d18eff17a&acdnat=1522699926_1793a74188ac6b373bc1aec837514b30

 

 

Growth, Distribution, and the Environment in a Stock-Flow Consistent Framework∗

Asjad Naqvi†

February 6, 2015

http://epub.wu.ac.at/4468/1/EcolEcon_WorkingPaper_2015_2.pdf

 

 

 

Foundations for an Ecological Macroeconomics: literature review and model development

Tim Jackson, Ben Drake (SURREY), Peter Victor (York University), Kurt Kratena, Mark Sommer (WIFO)

https://www.econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/125724/1/WWWforEurope_WPS_no065_MS38.pdf

 

 

 

Towards a Stock-Flow Consistent Ecological Macroeconomics

Authors: Tim Jackson (SURREY), Peter Victor (York University), Ali Asjad Naqvi (WU)

March 2016

https://www.econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/146611/1/856194174.pdf

http://epub.wu.ac.at/5012/1/WWWforEurope_WPS_no114_MS40.pdf

 

Consistency and Stability Analysis of Models of a Monetary Growth Imperative

Oliver Richtersa, Andreas Siemoneitb

a Department of Economics, Carl von Ossietzky University Oldenburg, http://www.oliver-richters.de
b Berlin, http://www.ezienzkritik.de

https://www.econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/144750/1/863731139.pdf

 

Credit Chains and Production Networks

Credit Chains and Production Networks

There are three kind of flows in a Supply Chain

  • Goods
  • Information
  • Financial

 

Credit Terms in a Supplier Buyer contracts determine payment delays which accumulate in current accounts of a Firm.

  • Account Receivables
  • Account Payables

 

Credit Relations

  • Bank to Bank
  • Bank to Firm
  • Firm to Firm

Dyad of Credit Relations

  • Supplier – Buyer

 

Triad of Credit Relations

  • Supplier – Bank – Buyer

Sources of Systemic Risk

  • Failure of a Firm and its impact on Suppliers and Customers (Flow of Goods)
  • Failure of a Bank and its impact on Trade Credit
  • Credit Contraction due to de-risking by the Banks
  • Decline in Correspondent Banking relations and its impact on Trade Finance

 

From Credit Chains and Sectoral Co-movement: Does the Use of Trade
Credit Amplify Sectoral Shocks?

Trade credit is an important source of short-term financing for firms, not only in the U.S., as documented by Petersen and Rajan (1997), but also around the World. For instance, accounts payables are larger than short-term debt in 60 percent of the countries covered by Worldscope. Also, across the world most firms simultaneously receive credit from their suppliers and grant it to their customers, which tend to be concentrated on specific sectors.  These characteristics of trade credit financing have led some authors to propose it as a mechanism for the propagation and amplification of idiosyncratic shocks. The intuition behind the mechanism is straightforward; a firm that faces a default by its customers may run into liquidity problems that force it to default to its own suppliers. Therefore, in a network of firms that borrow from each other, a temporary shock to the liquidity of some firms may cause a chain reaction in which other firms also get in financial difficulties, thus resulting in a large and persistent decline in aggregate activity. This idea was first formalized by Kiyotaki and Moore (1997) in a partial equilibrium setting, and has been recently extended to a general equilibrium environment by Cardoso-Lecourtois (2004), and Boissay (2006) who have also provided evidence of the potential quantitative importance of the mechanism by calibrating their models to the cases of Mexico and the U.S., respectively.

From Ontology of Bankruptcy Diffusion through Trade Credit
Channel

A supply network is a network of entities interacting to transform raw material into finished product for customers. Since interdependencies among supply network members on material, information, and finance are becoming increasingly intensive, financial status of one firm not only depends on its own management, but also on the performance and behaviours of other members. Therefore, understanding the financial flows variability and the material interactions is a key to quantify the risk of a firm. Due to the complex structure and dynamic interactions of modern supply networks, there are some difficulties faced by pure analysis approaches in analyzing financial status of the supply network members and the high degree of nonlinear interactions between them. Mathematical and operation research models usually do not function very well for this kind of financial decision making. These models always start with many assumptions and have difficulties modeling such complex systems that include many entities, relationships, features, parameters, and constraints. In addition, traditional modeling and analysis tools lack the ability to predict the impact of a specific event on the performance of the entire supply network.  Current financial data analysis with large volumes of structure data cannot offer the full picture and intrinsic insights into the risk nature of a company. Motivated by the literature gap in risk monitoring in investment background and limitations of analysis approaches for handling bankruptcy contagion phenomenon, we propose an ontological approach to present a formal, shared conceptualization of this domain knowledge.

From Inter-Firm Trade Finance in Times of Crisis

The severe recession that is hitting the global economy, with very low or even negative growth rates, has caused widespread contractions in international trade, both in developed and developing countries. World Trade Organization (WTO) has forecast that exports will decline by roughly 9% in volume terms in 2009 due to the collapse in global demand brought on by the biggest economic downturn in decades. The contraction in developed countries will be particularly severe with exports falling by 10%. In developing countries, which account for one-third of world trade, exports will shrink by some 2% to 3% in 2009.

The contraction in international trade has been accompanied by a sharp decline in the availability of trade finance. This decline is only partly explained by the contraction in demand: according to a BAFT (Banker’s Association for Trade and Finance) and International Monetary Fund (IMF) joint survey (2009), flows of trade finance to developed countries have fallen by 6% relative to the previous year, more than the reduction in trade flows, suggesting that part of the fall reflects a disruption of financial intermediation. The contraction in value of trade finance has also been accompanied by a sharp increase in its price. Fear that the decline in trade finance and the increase in its cost would accelerate the slowdown of world trade has triggered a number of government initiatives in support of trade finance (Chauffour and Farole,2009).

The situation is especially worrisome for firms operating in developing countries which rely heavily on trade finance to support both their exports and imports.1 With a restricted access to financing and an increased cost of financing, these firms may find difficulties in maintaining their production and trade activities.

 

Please see my related posts:

Supply Chain Finance (SCF) / Financial Supply Chain Management (F-SCM)

Production Chain Length and Boundary Crossings in Global Value Chains

Intra Industry Trade and International Production and Distribution Networks

Understanding Trade in Intermediate Goods

Trends in Intra Firm Trade of USA

Production and Distribution Planning : Strategic, Global, and Integrated

Development of Global Trade and Production Accounts: UN SEIGA Initiative

The Dollar Shortage, Again! in International Wholesale Money Markets

FDI vs Outsourcing: Extending Boundaries or Extending Network Chains of Firms

The Collapse of Global Trade during Global Financial Crisis of 2008-2009

Understanding Global Value Chains – G20/OECD/WB Initiative

Economics of Trade Finance

Balance Sheets, Financial Interconnectedness, and Financial Stability – G20 Data Gaps Initiative

Oscillations and Amplifications in Demand-Supply Network Chains

Contagion in Financial (Balance sheets) Networks

 

Key Sources of Research:

 

LIQUIDITY, BUSINESS CYCLES, AND MONETARY POLICY

Nobuhiro Kiyotaki
London School of Economics

John Moore
Edinburgh University and London School of Economics

27 November 2001

https://www.imf.org/external/np/seminars/eng/2008/fincycl/pdf/kimo.pdf

 

 

Credit Cycles

Nobuhiro Kiyotaki; John Moore

The Journal of Political Economy, Vol. 105, No. 2.

(Apr., 1997),

http://www.nviegi.net/teaching/master/km.pdf

 

Credit chains

Nobuhiro Kiyotaki (Princeton University)

John Moore (University of Edinburgh)

Date January 1997

http://www.econ.ed.ac.uk/papers/id118_esedps.pdf

https://www.minneapolisfed.org/research/conferences/research-events—conferences-and-programs/~/media/files/research/events/1997_01-31/Kiyotaki_CreditChains.pdf

 

 

Credit and Business Cycles

N Kiyotaki

1998

https://www.princeton.edu/~kiyotaki/papers/Credit-and-BusinessCycles.pdf

 

 

Inter-Enterprise Credit and Adjustment  During Financial Crises: The Role of Firm Size

Fabrizio Coricelli

Marco Frigerio

July, 2 2016

https://cepr.org/sites/default/files/Coricelli%2C%20Fabrizio%20paper.pdf

 

 

Credit chains and bankruptcy propagation in production networks

Stefano Battiston, Domenico Delli Gatti, Mauro Gallegati,
Bruce Greenwald, Joseph E. Stiglitz

2007

https://www8.gsb.columbia.edu/faculty/jstiglitz/sites/jstiglitz/files/2007_Credit_Chains.pdf

 

 

Trade Finance in Crisis : Market Adjustment or Market Failure ?

Jean-Pierre Chauffour

Thomas Farole

Date Written: July 1, 2009

https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1437955

Resaleable debt and systemic risk

Jason Roderick Donaldson , Eva Micheler

2018

http://www.jrdonaldson.com/Papers/Donaldson-Micheler-Resaleable_Debt.pdf

 

Supply chains and credit-market shocks: Some implications for emerging markets,

Jinjarak, Yothin (2013)

ADBI Working Paper Series, No. 443

https://www.econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/101241/1/770887406.pdf

 

 

Financial Amplification Mechanisms and the Federal Reserve’s Supply of Liquidity during the Crisis

Asani Sarkar
Jeffrey Shrader

Staff Report no. 431
February 2010

https://www.newyorkfed.org/medialibrary/media/research/staff_reports/sr431.pdf

 

 

Aggregate Fluctuations and the Role of Trade Credit

Lin Shao

2017

https://www.bankofcanada.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/swp2017-37.pdf

 

 

Supply Chain Disruptions and Trade Credit

LU Yi OGURA Yoshiaki

TODO Yasuyuki ZHU Lianming

2017

https://www.rieti.go.jp/jp/publications/dp/17e054.pdf

 

 

Credit Shocks and Aggregate Fluctuations in  an Economy with Production Heterogeneity

Aubhik Khan

Julia K. Thomas

September 2013

https://www.aubhik-khan.net/KhanThomasDCTsept2013.pdf

 

 

Financial Frictions in Production Networks

Saki Bigio

Jennifer La’O

February 7, 2013

https://www0.gsb.columbia.edu/faculty/sbigio/papers/FinancialFrictionsNetworks.pdf

 

Working Paper No. 67, April 2016

http://perueconomics.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/WP-67.pdf

 

 

The Origins of Aggregate Fluctuations in a Credit Network Economy

Levent Altinoglu

October 16, 2016
http://blogs.bu.edu/levent/files/2015/10/Altinoglu_JMP_CurrentVersion.pdf

September 30, 2015

https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/425a/fcb800d01a5b8dce9ed13a4a200bf51f6fed.pdf

 

Consolidated Bibliography

WTO

https://www.wto.org/english/res_e/booksp_e/aid4tradesupplychain13_biblio_e.pdf

 

 

Propagation of Financial Shocks in an Input-Output Economy with Trade and Financial Linkages of Firms

Shaowen Luo

December 4, 2015

http://www.economics.illinois.edu/seminars/documents/Luo.pdf

 

FDI, Trade Credit, and Transmission of Global Liquidity Shocks:
Evidence from Chinese Manufacturing Firms

Shu Lin and Haichun Ye

http://www.econ.cuhk.edu.hk/econ/images/content/news_event/seminars/2016-2017-2nd-semester/Lin–Ye_paper.pdf

 

 

Trade Credit, Financing Structure and Growth

Junjie Xia

October 27, 2016

http://www.junjiexia.com/uploads/7/6/7/2/76726065/jmp_oct16.pdf

 

The impact of corporate distress along the supply chain: evidences from United
States

Lucia Gibilaro

Gianluca Mattarocci

http://www.efmaefm.org/0EFMAMEETINGS/EFMA%20ANNUAL%20MEETINGS/2017-Athens/papers/EFMA2017_0526_fullpaper.pdf

 

 

Does credit crunch investments down?
New evidence on the real eects of the bank-lending channel

Federico Cinganoz Francesco Manaresix Enrico Settex

December 2013

http://www.federicocingano.eu/Credit_crunch_investments.pdf

 

Interwoven Lending, Uncertainty, and Liquidity Hoarding

Adam Zawadowski

December 13, 2017

http://www.personal.ceu.hu/staff/Adam_Zawadowski/papers/credit.pdf

 

 

Trade credit: Elusive insurance of rm growth

DENNIS BAMS, JAAP BOS and MAGDALENA PISA*

October 5, 2016

http://www.research.mbs.ac.uk/accounting-finance/Portals/0/Users/002/02/2/Trade%20credit%20Elusive%20insurance%20of%20firm%20growth%202016.pdf

 

 

Chain Reactions, Trade Credit and the Business Cycle

Miguel Cardoso-Lecourtois

http://fmwww.bc.edu/RePEc/esNASM04/up.4593.1075462930.pdf

 

From production networks to geographical economics.

Gérard Weisbuch, Stefano Battiston.

Journal ofEconomic Behavior and Organization, Elsevier, 2007, 64 (3- 4), pp.448

https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-00531863/document

 

 

Production networks and failure avalanches

Gerard Weisbuch
Stefano Battiston

March 5, 2018

https://arxiv.org/pdf/physics/0507101.pdf

 

 

Self-organised patterns in production networks

Gerard Weisbuch

October 10, 2005

http://www.lps.ens.fr/~weisbuch/gwcomplexus.pdf

 

 

Networks : Propagation of Shocks over Economic Networks

Daron Acemoglu

July 22, 2014.

https://economics.mit.edu/files/9790

 

 

Debt-Rank Analysis of Financial Distress Propagation on a Production Network in Japan

FUJIWARA Yoshi
University of Hyogo
TERAI Masaaki
RIKEN
FUJITA Yuji
Turnstone Research Institute, Inc.
SOUMA Wataru
Nihon University

https://www.rieti.go.jp/jp/publications/dp/16e046.pdf

 

 

Operational causes of bankruptcy propagation in supply chain

Zhongsheng Hua ⁎, Yanhong Sun 1, Xiaoyan Xu

2011

http://isiarticles.com/bundles/Article/pre/pdf/48280.pdf

 

 

Propagation of Financial Shocks in an Input-Output Economy with Trade and Financial Linkages of Firms

Shaowen Luo
September 20, 2015

http://www.econ.vt.edu/seminars/Seminar%20Papers/2016/10-02-15Luo.pdf

 

 

From Micro to Macro via Production Networks

Vasco M. Carvalho

http://www.crei.cat/wp-content/uploads/users/working-papers/carvalho_from_micro.pdf

 

 

Trade Credit and the  Propagation of Corporate Failure: An Empirical
Analysis

Tor Jacobson and Erik von Schedvin
August 2012

https://www.econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/81882/1/723939764.pdf

 

CREDIT MARKET DISRUPTIONS AND LIQUIDITY SPILLOVER EFFECTS IN THE SUPPLY CHAIN

Anna M. Costello

August 8, 2017

https://www.gsb.stanford.edu/sites/gsb/files/costello-anna-acctgcamp2017_0.pdf

 

Modeling defaults of companies in multi-stage supply chain networks

Kamil J.Mizgier, StephanM.Wagner,, JanuszA.Holyst

2010

http://mars.if.pw.edu.pl/~jholyst/Mizgier_etal_InPress_Modeling_defaults_of.pdf

 

 

 

The origins of scale-free production networks

Stanislao Gualdizand Antoine Mandelx

June 28, 2015

http://www.siecon.org/online/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/Gualdi.pdf

 

 

Optimization of order policies in supply networks

S. GÄottlich¤ M. Hertyy C. Ringhoferz

August 18, 2008

https://www.ki-net.umd.edu/pubs/files/FRG-2008-Ringhofer-Christian.FRG_Ringhofer_Orders080814.pdf

 

Financial Instability after Minsky: Heterogeneity, Agent Based Models and Credit
Networks

Domenico Delli Gatti

April 10, 2012

https://www.ineteconomics.org/uploads/papers/delli-gatti-domenico-berlin-paper.pdf

 

Measuring the Systemic Risk in Inter firm Transaction Networks

Makoto Hazama
And
Iichiro Uesugi

http://hermes-ir.lib.hit-u.ac.jp/rs/bitstream/10086/28392/1/wp066.pdf

 

Systemic Risk Assessment in Complex Supply Networks

Anna Ledwoch, Alexandra Brintrup, J¨orn Mehnen, Ashutosh Tiwari

https://pure.strath.ac.uk/portal/files/66716085/Ledwoch_etal_SJ_2016_Systemic_risk_assessment_in_complex_supply_networks.pdf

 

TRADE CREDIT DEFAULTS AND LIQUIDITY PROVISION BY FIRMS

Reint Gropp
Frédéric Boissay

2007

https://www.ecb.europa.eu/pub/pdf/scpwps/ecbwp753.pdf

 

The future of agent-based modelling.

Matteo Richiardi

Institute for New Economic Thinking and Nuffield College, Oxford, United Kingdom
Collegio Carlo Alberto, Moncalieri, Italy

This draft: June 2015

https://www.nuffield.ox.ac.uk/media/1702/abmfuture-v12.pdf

 

 

Financially Constrained Fluctuations in an Evolving Network Economy

Domenico Delli Gatti
Mauro Gallegati
Bruce Greenwald
Alberto Russo
Joseph E. Stiglitz

http://terna.to.it/ABM-BaF09/presentations/DelliGatti%28presentation%29_ABM.pdf

 

 

Credit Chains and Sectoral Comovement: Does the Use of Trade Credit Amplify Sectoral Shocks?

Claudio Raddatz

The World Bank
March, 2007

http://www.webmeets.com/files/papers/LACEA-LAMES/2007/335/Credit_chains_051707_withtables.pdf

 

 

Linkages and spillovers in global production networks: firm-level analysis of the Czech automotive industry

Petr Pavlinek

Pavla Žížalová

https://digitalcommons.unomaha.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1039&context=geoggeolfacpub

 

Ontology of Bankruptcy Diffusion through Trade Credit
Channel

Lin Cheng

Huaiqing Wang

Huaping Chen

https://50years.acs.org.au/content/dam/acs/50-years/journals/jrpit/JRPIT44.4.401.pdf

 

OPTIMAL ORDER AND DISTRIBUTION STRATEGIES IN PRODUCTION NETWORKS

Simone Gottlich, Michael Herty, and Christian Ringhofer

https://math.la.asu.edu/~chris/SpringerOpt10.pdf

 

Profitability, Trade Credit and Institutional Structure of Production

Michael Gofman
December 9, 2013

http://gofman.info/TC/Supplier-Customer%20Network.pdf

 

The Economics of Information and Financial
Networks

Stefano Battiston
July 22, 2016

https://simpolproject.eu/download/simpol-initiative-research/battiston2016information.pdf

 

Supply Chain Perspectives and Issues: A Literature Review

Albert Park
Gaurav Nayyar
Patrick Low

http://www.asiaglobalinstitute.hku.hk/en/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/supply-chain-perspectives-and-issues.pdf

 

 

LIAISONS DANGEREUSES: INCREASING CONNECTIVITY, RISK SHARING, AND SYSTEMIC RISK

Stefano Battiston
Domenico Delli Gatti
Mauro Gallegati
Bruce C. Greenwald
Joseph E. Stiglitz

http://www.nber.org/papers/w15611.pdf

 

 

Inter-Firm Trade Finance in Times of Crisis

Anna Maria C. Menichini

http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/en/649481468314087810/pdf/WPS5112.pdf

 

 

Reducing the Probability of Bankruptcy Through Supply Chain Coordination

Xiaoyan Xu, Yanhong Sun, and Zhongsheng Hua

2010

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Yanhong_Sun5/publication/220508846_Reducing_the_Probability_of_Bankruptcy_Through_Supply_Chain_Coordination/links/573eac9d08ae298602e6e77a.pdf

 

 

Pathways towards instability in financial networks

Marco Bardoscia, Stefano Battiston Fabio Caccioli & Guido Caldarelli

2017

http://lims.ac.uk/wp-content/uploads/bardoscia2017pathways-1.pdf

 

 

International Credit Supply Shocks

Ambrogio Cesa-Bianchiy Andrea Ferreroz Alessandro Rebuccix

June 16, 2017

https://www.bostonfed.org/-/media/Documents/events/2017/boston-policy-workshop/AlessandroRebucci.pdf?la=en

 

Risk Propagation through Payment Distortion in Supply Chains

Alejandro Serrano

Rogelio Oliva

Santiago Kraiselburd

https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/5b5f/0e6d7dc9d4b4f6bcada884b71562791404ed.pdf

 

 

Payment Defaults and Interfirm Liquidity Provision

https://academic.oup.com/rof/article-abstract/17/6/1853/1591419

 

SYSTEMIC RISK: A SURVEY

BY OLIVIER DE BANDT
AND PHILIPP HARTMANN

November 2000

https://www.econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/152469/1/ecbwp0035.pdf

 

 

Risk Propagation in Supply Chains

Alejandro Serrano

Rogelio Oliva

Santiago Kraiselburd

https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/2db1/f3278ab2a75ff11b0142fba19a4cf223805a.pdf

 

 

How Inventory Is (Should Be) Financed: Trade Credit in Supply Chains with Demand
Uncertainty and Costs of Financial Distress

Song (Alex) Yang, John R. Birge

http://faculty.chicagobooth.edu/workshops/omscience/past/more/pdf/YangBirge_trade%20credit.pdf

https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2746645

https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1734682

 

 

The Supply Chain Effects of Bankruptcy

S. Alex Yang

John R. Birge, Rodney P. Parker

https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/6efb/86a8667f24af2c6a5cd7eb52bbd12b39697b.pdf

http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.715.5812&rep=rep1&type=pdf

 

Supply Chain Management: Supplier Financing Schemes and Inventory Strategies

Min Wang

https://www8.gsb.columbia.edu/programs/sites/programs/files/abstracts/Min_Wang_Dissertation.pdf

 

Foreign Investment and Supply Chains in Emerging Markets: Recurring Problems and Demonstrated Solutions

Theodore H. Moran

PIIE

2014

https://piie.com/publications/wp/wp14-12.pdf

 

Improving cash flow using credit management
The outline case

http://www.cimaglobal.com/Documents/ImportedDocuments/cid_improving_cashflow_using_credit_mgm_Apr09.pdf.pdf

 

CREDIT CHAINS AND THE PROPAGATION OF
FINANCIAL DISTRESS

2006

by Frederic Boissay

http://sdw.zentral-bank.eu/pub/pdf/scpwps/ecbwp573.pdf

 

Exposure to international crises: trade vs. financial contagion

Everett Grant

2016

https://www.esrb.europa.eu/pub/pdf/wp/esrbwp30.en.pdf?7b7cc950c1a2286d395ed8489bfde5c7

 

 

Credit Contagion and Trade Credit Supply:
Evidence from Small Business Data in Japan

TSURUTA Daisuke

https://www.rieti.go.jp/jp/publications/dp/07e043.pdf

 

 

The Price of Complexity in Financial Networks

Joseph Stiglitz

2017

https://www8.gsb.columbia.edu/faculty/jstiglitz/sites/jstiglitz/files/The%20Price%20of%20Complexity%20in%20Financial%20Networks.pdf

 

 

The Price of Complexity in Financial Networks

S. Battiston

2017

https://www.jbs.cam.ac.uk/fileadmin/user_upload/research/centres/risk/downloads/160913_slides_battison.pdf

 

 

 

Supply Chain Finance (SCF) / Financial Supply Chain Management (F-SCM)

Supply Chain Finance (SCF) / Financial Supply Chain Management (F-SCM)

 

 

From STANDARD DEFINITIONS FOR TECHNIQUES OF SUPPLY CHAIN FINANCE

fscm8

There are two Areas where FSCM/SCF names are used but in different contexts.

  • Inter firm FSCM
  • Intra firm FSCM

 

Inter firm F-SCM

  • Trade Finance
  • Supply Chain Finance (SCF)
  • Value Chain Finance
  • Supplier Finance
  • Inter firm Finance
  • Reverse Factoring
  • Collaborative  Cash to Cash Cycles Management

During 2008 global financial crisis, the trade financing dried up resulting in decline in trade of goods and services.

Since the crisis, Financial De-globalization and Decline of Correspondent Banking has also made availability of financial credit harder.

Cash flow and working capital management is helped by inter firm collaboration among Suppliers and Buyers.

Financial Institutions which provide trade credit also benefit from inter firm collaboration.

 From SUPPLY CHAIN FINANCE FUNDAMENTALS: What It Is, What It’s Not and How it Works

What Supply Chain Finance is Not

The world of trade finance is complex and varied. There are numerous ways to increase business capital on hand and, in many cases, the differences are slightly nuanced. Given this landscape, it’s not just important to understand what supply chain finance is; it’s also important to understand what it is not.

It is not a loan. Supply chain finance is an extension of the buyer’s accounts payable and is not considered financial debt. For the supplier, it represents a non-recourse, true sale of receivables. There is no lending on either side of the buyer/supplier equation, which means there is no impact to balance sheets.

It is not dynamic discounting or an early payment program. Early payment programs, such as dynamic discounting, are buyer-initiated programs where buyers offer suppliers earlier payments in return for discounts on their invoices. Unlike supply chain finance, buyers are seeking to lower their cost of goods, not to improve their cash flow. Dynamic discounting and early payment programs often turn out to be expensive for both suppliers (who are getting paid less than agreed upon) and buyers who tie up their own cash to fund the programs.

It is not factoring. Factoring enables a supplier to sell its invoices to a factoring agent (in most cases, a financial institution) in return for earlier, but partial, payment. Suppliers initiate the arrangement without the buyer’s involvement. Thus factoring is typically much more expensive than buyer-initiated supply chain finance. Also, suppliers trade “all or nothing” meaning they have no choice to participate from month-to-month to the degree that their cash flow needs dictate. Finally, most factoring programs are recourse loans, meaning if a supplier has received payment against an invoice that the buyer subsequently does not pay, the lender has recourse to claw back the funds.

 

From Mckinsey on Payments

fscm10

 

From Financial Supply Chain Management

financial-supply-chain-management-4-728

 

From Best Practices in Cash Flow Management and Reporting

46_-3571_20

 

From STANDARD DEFINITIONS FOR TECHNIQUES OF SUPPLY CHAIN FINANCE

fscm9

 

From Financing GPNs through inter-firm collaboration?
Insights from the automotive industry in Germany and Brazil

fscm 3

 

Intra Firm F-SCM

  • Working Capital Management
  • Cash Flow Management
  • Liquidity Management
  • Cash to Cash Conversion Cycle Management (C2C Cycle/CCC)
  • Financial Supply Chain Management (F-SCM) in Manufacturing companies
  • Financial Supply chain management in financial institutions
  • Supply Chain Finance
  • Accounts Payable Optimization
  • Accounts Receivable Optimization
  • Operations and Finance Interfaces
  • Current Asset Management (Current Ratio Analysis)

This is not a new subject.  Corporate Finance, Financial Controls, and working capital management have been active business issues.  Benefits of Supply chain management include increase in inventory turnover and decline in current assets.

There are many world class companies who manage their supply chains well and work with minimal working capital.  Lean Manufacturing, Agile Manufacturing, JIT manufacturing are related concepts.  Just-In-Time manufacturing developed in Toyota Corp. reduces inventory portion of C2C cycle.  Other examples include

  • Apple
  • Walmart
  • Dell

Currently, most of the Supply Chain analytics efforts unfortunately do not integrate analysis of financial benefits of operating decisions.

There are many studies recently which suggest that Cash to Cash Conversion Cycle is a better determinant of corporate liquidity.  C2C Cycle is a dynamic liquidity indicator and Current Assets is a static indicator of liquidity.  I would like to point out that none of the studies relate C2C cycle with Current Ratio.  Current Ratio is based on balance sheet positions of current assets and current liabilities.  C2C cycle is based on flows in supply chains.  Accumulation of flow results in Current assets (Stock).  To make it Stock-Flow Consistent, more work is required.

 

From Supply Chain Finance: some conceptual insights.

fscm2

From Financial Supply Chain Management

financial-supply-chain-management-5-728

 

From The Interface of Operations and Finance in Global Supply Chains

fscm4

 

From SUPPLY CHAIN-ORIENTED APPROACH OF WORKING CAPITAL MANAGEMENT

ifscm5

 

From IMPROVING FIRM PERFORMANCE THROUGH VALUE-DRIVEN SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT: A CASH CONVERSION CYCLE APPROACH

fscm6

 

From IMPROVING FIRM PERFORMANCE THROUGH VALUE-DRIVEN SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT: A CASH CONVERSION CYCLE APPROACH

fscm7

 

From THE CYCLE TIMES OF WORKING CAPITAL: FINANCIAL VALUE CHAIN ANALYSIS METHOD

fscm12

 

Call for papers: Supply Chain Finance

Call for papers for Special Topic Forum in Journal of Purchasing and Supply Management (Manuscript Submission:  March 31, 2017)

Supply chain finance is a concept that lacks definition and conceptual foundation.  However, the recent economic downturn forced corporates to face a series of financial and economic difficulties that strongly increased supply chain financial risk, including bankruptcy or over-leveraging of debt.  The mitigation and management of supply chain financial risk is becoming an increasingly important topic for both practitioners and academics leading to a developing area of study known as supply chain finance.  There are two major perspectives related to the idea of managing finance across the supply chain.  The first is a relatively short-term solution that serves as more of a “bridge” and that is provided by financial institutions, focused on accounts payables and receivables.  The second is more of a supply chain oriented perspective – which may or may not involve a financial institution, focused on working capital optimization in terms of accounts payable, receivable, inventory, and asset management.  These longer-term solutions focus on strategically managing financial implications across the supply chain.

Recent years have seen a considerable reduction in the granting of new loans, with a significant increase in the cost of corporate borrowing (Ivashina and Scharfstein, 2010). Such collapse of the asset and mortgage-backed markets dried up liquidity from industries (Cornett et al., 2011). In such difficult times, firms (especially those with stronger bargaining power) forced suppliers to extend trade credit in order to supplement the reduction in other forms of financing (Coulibaly et al., 2013; Garcia-Appendini and Montoriol-Garriga, 2013). The general lack of liquidity, in particular for SMEs, has directly affected companies’ ability to stay in the market, reflecting on the stability of entire supply chains. There are many other factors influencing liquidity and financial health that are critical to assess.

These trends and the continued growth of outsourced spend have contributed considerably to the need for and spread of solutions and programs that help to mitigate and better manage financial risk within and across the supply chain.  One of the most important approaches is what is being termed Supply Chain Finance (SCF) (Gelsomino et al., 2016; Pfohl and Gomm, 2009; Wuttke et al., 2013a). SCF is an approach for two or more organizations in a supply chain, including external service provides, to jointly create value through means of planning, steering, and controlling the flow of financial resources on an inter-organizational level (Hofmann, 2005; Wuttke et al., 2013b).  It involves the inter-company optimization of financial flows with customers, suppliers and service providers to increase the value of the supply chain members  (Pfohl and Gomm, 2009).  According to Lamoureux and Evans (2011) supply chain financial solutions, processes, methods are designed to improve the effectiveness of financial supply chains by preventing detrimental cost shifting and improving the visibility, availability, delivery and cost of cash for all global value chain partners.  The benefits of the SCF approach include reduction of working capital, access to more funding at lower costs, risk reduction, as well as increase of trust, commitment, and profitability through the chain (Randall and Farris II, 2009).

Literature on SCF is still underdeveloped and a multidisciplinary approach to research is needed in this area. In order to better harmonize contributions of a more financial nature with ones coming from the perspective of purchasing & supply chain, there is a need of developing theory on SCF, starting with a comprehensive definition of those instruments or solutions that constitute the SCF landscape. SCF has been neglected in the Purchasing & Supply Management (PSM) literature, although PSM plays a critical role in managing finance within the supply chain.  PSM uses many of the processes and tools that are part of a comprehensive supply chain financial program to better manage the supply base, in terms of relationships, total cost of ownership, cost strategies and pricing volatility (see for example Shank and Govindarajan 1992). Reverse factoring is a technique which is also widely used to manage the supply base (Wuttke et al, 2013a) as is supplier development and investment in suppliers.

Research on SCF from a PSM perspective needs further development. In particular, empirical evidence would prove useful for testing existing models and hypotheses, addressing the more innovative schemes and investigating the adoption level and the state of the art of different solutions. Research is also needed for the development of a general theory of supply chain finance.  There is also limited research that focuses on the link between supply chain financial tools and supply chain financial performance.  Finally, considering the plurality of solutions that shape the SCF landscape, literature should move towards the definition of holistic instruments to choose the best SCF strategy for a supply chain, considering its financial performance and the contextual variables (e.g. structure, bargaining power) that characterize it.

Potential topics

The purpose of this special topic forum is to publish high-quality, theoretical and empirical papers addressing advances on Supply Chain Finance. Original, high quality contributions that are neither published nor currently under review by any other journals are sought. Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Theory development, concept and definition of SCF
  • Taxonomy of SCF solutions
  • Strategic cost management across the supply chain
  • Total cost of ownership
  • Life cycle assessment and analysis
  • Commodity risk and pricing volatility
  • Supply chain financial metrics and measures
  • Cost-benefit analysis
  • Relationship implications of supply chain finance
  • Tax and transfer pricing in the supply chain
  • Foreign exchange and global currency and financing risk
  • Financial network design and financial supply chain flows
  • The organizational perspective on SCF and the implementation process
  • Role of innovative technologies to support SCF ( (e.g. block chain, internet of things)
  • Supply chain collaboration for improved supply chain financial solutions
  • SCF adoption models, enablers and barriers
  • SCF from different party perspectives (especially suppliers and providers)
  • SCF and risk mitigation and management

Manuscript preparation and submission

Before submission, authors should carefully read the Journal’s “Instructions for Authors”. The review process will follow the Journal’s normal practice. Prospective authors should submit an electronic copy of their complete manuscript via Elsevier’s manuscript submission system (https://ees.elsevier.com/jpsm) selecting “STF Supply Chain Finance” as submission category and specifying the Supply Chain Finance topic in the accompanying letter. Manuscripts are due March 31, 2017 with expected publication in June of 2018.

FOR COMMENTS OR QUESTIONS PLEASE CONTACT THE GUEST EDITORS:

Federico Caniato, Politecnico di Milano, School of Management, federico.caniato@polimi.it

Michael Henke, TU Dortmund and Fraunhofer IML, Michael.Henke@iml.fraunhofer.de

George A. Zsidisin, Virginia Commonwealth University, gazsidisin@vcu.edu

References

Cornett, M.M., McNutt, J.J., Strahan, P.E., Tehranian, H., 2011. Liquidity risk management and credit supply in the financial crisis. J. financ. econ. 101, 297–312.

Coulibaly, B., Sapriza, H., Zlate, A., 2013. Financial frictions, trade credit, and the 2008–09 global financial crisis. Int. Rev. Econ. Financ. 26, 25–38.

Garcia-Appendini, E., Montoriol-Garriga, J., 2013. Firms as liquidity providers: Evidence from the 2007–2008 financial crisis. J. financ. econ. 109, 272–291.

Gelsomino, L.M., Mangiaracina, R., Perego, A., Tumino, A., 2016. Supply Chain Finance: a literature review. Int. J. Phys. Distrib. Logist. Manag. 46, 1–19.

Govindarajan, Vijay, and John K. Shank. “Strategic cost management: tailoring controls to strategies.” Journal of Cost Management 6.3 (1992): 14-25.

Wuttke, D. A., Blome, C., Foerstl, K., & Henke, M. (2013a). Managing the innovation adoption of supply chain finance—Empirical evidence from six European case studies. Journal of Business Logistics, 34(2), 148-166.

Wuttke, D. A., Blome, C., & Henke, M. (2013b). Focusing the financial flow of supply chains: An empirical investigation of financial supply chain management. International journal of production economics, 145(2), 773-789.

Hofmann, E., 2005. Supply Chain Finance: some conceptual insights. Logistik Manag. Innov. Logistikkonzepte. Wiesbad. Dtsch. Univ. 203–214.

Ivashina, V., Scharfstein, D., 2010. Bank lending during the financial crisis of 2008. J. financ. econ. 97, 319–338.

Lamoureux, J.-F., Evans, T.A., 2011. Supply Chain Finance: A New Means to Support the Competitiveness and Resilience of Global Value Chains. Social Science Research Network, Rochester, NY.

Lekkakos, S.D., Serrano, A., 2016. Supply chain finance for small and medium sized enterprises: the case of reverse factoring. Int. J. Phys. Distrib. Logist. Manag.

Pfohl, H.C., Gomm, M., 2009. Supply chain finance: optimizing financial flows in supply chains. Logist. Res. 1, 149–161.

Randall, W., Farris II, T., 2009. Supply chain financing: using cash-to-cash variables to strengthen the supply chain. Int. J. Phys. Distrib. Logist. Manag. 39, 669–689.

 

 

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http://primerevenue.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/supplychainFundamentals.pdf

Call for papers: Supply Chain Finance

Call for papers for Special Topic Forum in Journal of Purchasing and Supply Management (Manuscript Submission:  March 31, 2017)

https://www.journals.elsevier.com/journal-of-purchasing-and-supply-management/call-for-papers/call-for-papers-supply-chain-finance

 

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Supply chain finance: optimizing financial flows in supply chains

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2009

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Hans_Christian_Pfohl/publication/220232986_Supply_Chain_Finance-_Optimizing_Financial_Flows_in_Supply_Chains/links/5576960408ae75363751afb1.pdf

 

 

Supply Chain Finance: some conceptual insights.

Hofmann, E. (2005)

In: Lasch, R./ Janker, C.G. (Hrsg.): Logistik Management – Innovative Logistikkonzepte, Wiesbaden
2005, S. 203-214.

https://www.alexandria.unisg.ch/22597/1/Supply%20Chain%20Finance.pdf

 

 

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Częstochowa University of Technology

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Herbert Kotzab

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http://www.academia.edu/download/38511199/Hofmann_et_al-2010-Journal_of_Business_Logistics.pdf

Financial Supply Chain Management – Neue Herausforderungen für die Finanz- und Logistikwelt.

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Die Financial Chain im Supply Chain Management: Konzeptionelle Einordnung und Identifikation von Werttreibern.

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2006

https://www.alexandria.unisg.ch/30679/1/Quantifying%20Network%20Performance_final%20version.pdf

 

 

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by
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& Herbert Kotzab, Copenhagen Business School, Denmark

2006

 

http://www.academia.edu/download/39750008/Developing_and_discussing_a_supply_chain20151106-23047-gve831.pdf

 

 

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Afonso Fleury

 

http://ejournal.narotama.ac.id/files/The%20link%20between%20purchasing%20and%20supply%20management%20maturity%20models%20and%20the%20financial%20performance%20of%20international%20firms.pdf

 

 

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Supply Chain Finance: Optimal Introduction and Adoption Decisions

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Win-win and no-win situations in supply chain finance: The case of accounts receivable programs

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2017

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Nataliia G. Silaeva

2016

https://dspace.spbu.ru/bitstream/11701/5194/1/Master_thesis_Silaeva_Nataliya.pdf

 

 

Blockchain-driven supply chain finance: Towards a conceptual framework from a buyer perspective

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Selecting financial service providers for supply chains: How cross-functional collaboration can improve effectiveness and efficiency

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Prof. Dr. Erik Hofmann

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Supply chain finance as a value added service offered by a lead logistics provider

Careaga Franco, V.G.
Award date:
2016

https://pure.tue.nl/ws/files/46923583/840401-1.pdf

 

 

B2B PAYMENTS, SUPPLY CHAIN FINANCE & E-INVOICING MARKET

Mirela Amariei
Tiberiu Avram
Ionela Barbuta
Simona Cristea
Sebastian Lupu
Mihaela Mihaila
Andreea Nita
Adriana Screpnic

2015

https://www.ciosummits.com/B2B_Payments_Supply_Chain_Finance__E-invoicing_Market_Guide_2015.pdf

 

 

Linking corporate strategy and supply chain management

Erik Hofmann

http://www.hadjarian.com/company/1860230.pdf

 

 

Concepts and Trade-Offs in Supply Chain Finance

Kasper van der Vliet

http://alexandria.tue.nl/extra2/792140.pdf

 

 

Supply Chain Finance as a Value Added Service offered by a Lead Logistics Provider

by
Victor Gerardo Careaga Franco

http://alexandria.tue.nl/extra2/afstversl/tm/Careaga_Franco_2016.pdf

 

Value Chain Finance: How Banks can Leverage Growth Opportunities for SME Banking Customers

Qamar Saleem, Global SME Banking and Value Chain Specialist, IFC

Dr. Eugenio Cavenaghi, Managing Director -Trade, Export & Supply Chain Finance, Banco Santander

https://www.smefinanceforum.org/sites/default/files/post/files/Value%20Chain%20Finance_Qamar%20Saleem.pdf

 

 

 

Supply-chain finance: The emergence of a new competitive landscape

McKinsey

https://www.mckinsey.com/~/media/McKinsey/Industries/Financial%20Services/Our%20Insights/Supply%20chain%20finance%20The%20emergence%20of%20a%20new%20competitive%20landscape/MoP22_Supply_chain_finance_Emergence_of_a_new_competitive_landscape_2015.ashx

 

 

Fintechs and the Financial Side of Global Value Chains— The Changing Trade-Financing Environment

IMF

2017

http://www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/bop/2017/pdf/17-21.pdf

 

 

Global Supply Chain Management: Front and Center for Treasurers
Delivering Innovative Solutions that Integrate Financial and Physical Supply Chains

JP Morgan

https://www.jpmorgan.com/pdfdoc/jpmorgan/cash/pdf/global_supply_chain_front_and_center_for_treasurers

 

 

 

Supply Chain Finance

Aberdeen Group

2011

http://media.treasuryandrisk.com/treasuryandrisk/historical/whitepapers/Documents/SCF%20Gaining%20Control%200258-6833-RA-SCFinance-SP-10-NSP.pdf

 

 

 

Supply chain financing: Using cash-to-cash variables to strengthen the supply chain

Wesley S. Randall

M. Theodore Farris II

2009

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/235317652_Supply_chain_financing_Using_cash-to-cash_variables_to_strengthen_the_supply_chain

 

 

 

Supply Chain Finance: ANew Means to Support the Competitiveness and Resilience of Global Value Chains

Jean-François Lamoureux and Todd Evans

http://www.dfait-maeci.gc.ca/economist-economiste/assets/pdfs/research/TPR_2011_GVC/12_Lamoureux_and_Evans_e_FINAL.pdf

 

 

 

Maximising the value of supply chain finance

van der Vliet, K.; Reindorp, M.J.; Fransoo, J.C.

2013

https://pure.tue.nl/ws/files/3620999/387399093290135.pdf

 

 

 

The Interface of Operations and Finance in Global Supply Chains

by
Lima Zhao

2014

https://opus4.kobv.de/opus4-whu/files/179/Zhao_Lima_WHU_Diss_2014.pdf

 

 

 

Supply Chain Finance A conceptual framework to advance research

Kasper van der Vliet, Matthew J. Reindorp, Jan C. Fransoo
Beta Working Paper series 418

http://purl.tue.nl/23232338094103.pdf

 

 

COORDINATING WORKING CAPITAL MANAGEMENT MODEL IN COLLABORATIVE
SUPPLY CHAINS

A. Ivakina, N. Zenkevich

# 9 (E) – 2017

https://dspace.spbu.ru/bitstream/11701/8600/1/WP_9%28E%29-2017_Ivakina_Zenkevich.pdf

 

 

A conceptual model for supply chain finance for SMEs at operational level ‘An essay on the Supply Chain Finance paradigm ….

Jan H Jansen

2017

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Jan_Jansen11/publication/316245913_A_conceptual_model_for_supply_chain_finance_for_SMEs_at_operational_level_’An_essay_on_the_Supply_Chain_Finance_paradigm_’_Vestnik_Chelyabinsk_State_University_Version_2_18_April_2017/links/5a17d84aaca272df0808ca79/A-conceptual-model-for-supply-chain-finance-for-SMEs-at-operational-level-An-essay-on-the-Supply-Chain-Finance-paradigm-Vestnik-Chelyabinsk-State-University-Version-2-18-April-2017.pdf

 

 

Cash Flow Management and Manufacturing Firm Financial Performance: A Longitudinal Perspective

James R. Kroes

Andrew S. Manikas

http://scholarworks.boisestate.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1040&context=itscm_facpubs

 

 

 

TOWARDS INTER-ORGANIZATIONAL WORKING CAPITAL MANAGEMENT

Sari Monto

2013

https://www.doria.fi/bitstream/handle/10024/90028/isbn9789522653840.pdf?sequence=2

 

 

 

THE CYCLE TIMES OF WORKING CAPITAL: FINANCIAL VALUE CHAIN ANALYSIS METHOD

Miia Pirttilä

2014

https://www.doria.fi/bitstream/handle/10024/102180/Pirttilä_A4.pdf?sequence=2

 

 

Impact of Cash Conversion Cycle on Working Capital through Profitability: Evidence from Cement Industry of Pakistan

Afaq Ahmed Khan1, Mohsin Ayaz2, Raja Muhammad Waseem3, Sardar Osama

Bin Haseeb Abbasi4, Moazzam Ijaz

2016

http://www.iosrjournals.org/iosr-jbm/papers/Vol18-issue3/Version-2/Q1803021124131.pdf

 

 

Cash Conversion Cycle and Firms’ Profitability – A Study of Listed Manufacturing Companies of Pakistan

1Raheem Anser, 2Qaisar Ali Malik

2013

https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/d400/2a7cb44463d9b8d3b77e2b36e23466cde4ec.pdf

 

 

The Power of Supply Chain Finance

How companies can apply collaborative finance models in their supply chain to
mitigate risks and reduce costs

M. Steeman

https://www.windesheim.nl/~/media/files/windesheim/research-publications/thepowerofsupplychainfinance.pdf

 

 

Supply Chain Finance Payable and Receivable Solutions Guide

2012

JP Morgan

A Conceptual Model of Supply Chain Finance for SMEs at Operational Level

 Jan H Jansen

21 November 2017

 

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Jan_Jansen11/publication/316245913_A_conceptual_model_for_supply_chain_finance_for_SMEs_at_operational_level_’An_essay_on_the_Supply_Chain_Finance_paradigm_’_Vestnik_Chelyabinsk_State_University_Version_2_18_April_2017/links/5a17d84aaca272df0808ca79/A-conceptual-model-for-supply-chain-finance-for-SMEs-at-operational-level-An-essay-on-the-Supply-Chain-Finance-paradigm-Vestnik-Chelyabinsk-State-University-Version-2-18-April-2017.pdf

 

 

Cash-to-cash: The new supply chain management metric

M Theodore Farris II; Paul D Hutchison

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management; 2002

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Paul_Hutchison/publication/235295065_Cash-to-Cash_The_New_Supply_Chain_Management_Metric/links/02e7e5312767de88df000000.pdf

 

 

 

Integrating financial and physical supply chains: the role of banks in enabling supply chain integration

Rhian Silvestro

Paola Lustrato

2012

 

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Rhian_Silvestro/publication/263268792_Integrating_financial_and_physical_supply_chains_The_role_of_banks_in_enabling_supply_chain_integration/links/552f9c840cf21cb2faf005c0.pdf

 

 

 

Integration of Finance and Supply Chain: Emerging Frontier in Growing Economies

(A Case Study of Exporting Companies)

Muhammad Ahmar Saeed

Xiaonan Lv

 

http://www.diva-portal.org/smash/get/diva2:420165/FULLTEXT01.pdf

 

Research at the Interface of Finance, Operations, and Risk Management (iFORM): Recent Contributions and Future Directions

Volodymyr Babich

Panos Kouvelis

2017

https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3054711

 

 

 

PROCEEDINGS

Interface of Finance, Operations, and Risk Management (iFORM) SIG

2011

https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/e6e7/947ccbd42b1fe0e90f298ab96cfcef8f0448.pdf

 

 

 

Cash to Cash Cycle with a Supply Chain Perspective

Can Duman
Sawanee Sawathanon

2009

 

http://www.diva-portal.org/smash/get/diva2:221367/FULLTEXT01.pdf

 

DYNAMIC AND STATIC LIQUIDITY MEASURES IN WORKING CAPITAL STRATEGIES

Monika Bolek, PhD

 

http://eujournal.org/index.php/esj/article/viewFile/764/798

 

 

 

Does working capital management affect cost of capital?
A first empirical attempt to build up a theory for supply chain finance

Erik Hofmann, Judith Martin

2016

 

https://www.alexandria.unisg.ch/248595/1/Final%20paper_working%20capital%20management.pdf

 

 

 

Principle of Accounting System Dynamics – Modeling Corporate Financial Statements –

Kaoru Yamaguchi

 

http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.615.6514&rep=rep1&type=pdf

 

 

 

Money and Macroeconomic Dynamics

Accounting System Dynamics Approach

Edition 3.2

 

Kaoru Yamaguchi Ph.D.

Japan Futures Research Center

 

http://muratopia.org/Yamaguchi/macrodynamics/Macro%20Dynamics.pdf

 

 

 

Working Capital Management Model in value chains

Timo Eskelinen

2014

 

http://www.doria.fi/bitstream/handle/10024/96733/Working%20Capital%20Management%20Model%20in%20value%20chains_Timo%20Eskelinen.pdf?sequence=2&isAllowed=y

 

 

 

STANDARD DEFINITIONS FOR TECHNIQUES OF SUPPLY CHAIN FINANCE

Global Supply Chain Finance Forum

2016

 

https://cdn.iccwbo.org/content/uploads/sites/3/2017/01/ICC-Standard-Definitions-for-Techniques-of-Supply-Chain-Finance-Global-SCF-Forum-2016.pdf

https://baft.org/docs/default-source/current-news/download-the-scf-definitions.pdf

 

 

IMPROVING FIRM PERFORMANCE THROUGH VALUE-DRIVEN SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT: A CASH CONVERSION CYCLE APPROACH

Pan Theo Große-Ruyken
Stephan M. Wagner
Wen-Fong Lee

Baltic Management Review

Volume 3 No 1

2008

 

 

 

Best Practices in Cash Flow Management and Reporting

Hans-Dieter Scheuermann

http://www.financepractitioner.com/cash-flow-management-best-practice/best-practices-in-cash-flow-management-and-reporting?full

Financial Supply Chain Management

 

Gantt Chart Simulation for Stock Flow Consistent Production Schedules

Gantt Chart Simulation for Stock Flow Consistent Production Schedules

 

I have knowledge of two software which do Gantt chart simulation for production scheduling.  These are used by top most companies in the world for production planning and scheduling now a days known as Supply Chain Management (SCM).

Production Schedules are stock flow consistent which means that starting inventories, and unused production of products result in cumulative inventory which is plotted for each of the product.

Production and Shipments (arrivals and dispatched) create Flows and Inventory levels indicate Stock level positions.

Gantt Chart simulators are excellent tools for operations management in plants.

The first Gantt chart was actually developed by Karol Adamiecki in Poland.  He called it a Harmonogram.  Henry Gantt in 1910 published first gantt chart which was later than publication by Karol Adamiecki.

These two charts below show Simulator window in which Gantt chart and inventory level plots are displayed.

Gantt Chart Simulator in Aspen Tech Plant Scheduler for Production Scheduling

active-guidance_10740930

 

Gantt Chart Simulator in Atlantic Decision Sciences Scheduler

Scheduling Board Single Chart

Key Sources for Research:

 

A Presentation by Chris Jones on Evolution of Graphical Production Scheduling Software

at the Cornell University Deptt of ORIE

 

 

 

Atlantic Decision Sciences

http://atlanticdecisionsciences.com

 

 

Aspen Technology

http://aspentech.com/products/aspen-plant-scheduler/

 

 

History of Gantt Chart

http://www.ganttchart.com/orgforwork.html

 

 

History of Production Scheduling

http://www.springer.com/cda/content/document/cda_downloaddocument/9780387331157-c1.pdf?SGWID=0-0-45-321351-p148129370

 

 

The harmonogram: an overlooked method of scheduling work.

Marsh, E. R. (1976).

Project Management Quarterly, 7(1), 21–25.

https://www.pmi.org/learning/library/harmonogram-overlooked-method-scheduling-work-5666

 

The Harmonogram of Karol Adamiecki

Edward R. Marsh

http://amj.aom.org/content/18/2/358

 

Karol Adamiecki

https://www.pocketbook.co.uk/blog/tag/karol-adamiecki/

Production Chain Length and Boundary Crossings in Global Value Chains

Production Chain Length and Boundary Crossings in Global Value Chains

 

From Structure and length of value chains

In a value chain, value is added in sequential production stages and is carried forward from one producer to the next in the form of intermediate inputs. Value chains driven by the fragmentation of production are not an entirely new economic phenomenon, but the increasing reliance on imported intermediate inputs makes value chains global.

According to a 2013 report by the OECD, WTO and UNCTAD for the G-20 Leaders Summit, “Value chains have become a dominant feature of the world economy” (OECD et al., 2013).

Obviously, this dominant feature of the world economy needs measuring and analyzing. Policy-relevant questions include, but are not limited to:

  • what is the contribution of global value chains to economy GDP and employment? how long and complex are value chains?
  • what is the involvement and position of individual industries in global value chains? do multiple border crossings in global value chains really matter?

These and related questions generated a considerable amount of investigations proposing new measures of exports and production to account for global value chains. Some of those were designed to re-calculate trade  flows in value added terms, whereas other provided an approximation of the average length of production process.

A relatively new stream of research focuses on a deep decomposition of value added or final demand ( rather than exports or imports ) into components with varied paths along global value chains and measurements of the length of the related production processes. Consider, for example, a petrochemical plant that generates some value added equal to its output less all intermediate inputs used. We would be interested to know which part of this value added, embodied in the petrochemicals, is used entirely within the domestic economy and which part is exported.

We would also inquire how much of the latter satisfies final demand in partner countries and how much is further used in production and, perhaps, in exports to third countries and so on. We would be interested, in particular, in counting the number of production stages the value added in these petrochemicals passes along the chain before reaching its final user.

 

From Structure and length of value chains

APL

 

 

From Structure and length of value chains

A natural question is whether this method can be applied to the real economy with myriads of products, industries and dozens of partner countries? It can surely be applied if the data on inter-industry transactions are organized in the form of input-output accounts, and the computations are performed in block matrix environment. In fact, the measurement of the number of production stages or the length of production chains has attracted the interest of many input-output economists. The idea of simultaneously counting and weighting the number of inter-industry transactions was formalized by Dietzenbacher et al. (2005). Their “average propagation length” (APL) is the average number of steps it takes an exogenous change in one industry to affect the value of production in another industry. It is the APL concept on which we build the count of the number of production stages from the petrochemical plant to its consumers in our simplified example above. The only difference is that Dietzenbacher et al. (2005), and many authors in the follow-up studies, neglect the completion stage. First applications of the APL concept to measure the length of cross-border production chains appear in Dietzenbacher and Romero (2007) and Inomata (2008), though Oosterhaven and Bouwmeester (2013) warn that the APL should only be used to compare pure interindustry linkages and not to compare different economies or different industries.

Fally (2011, 2012) proposes the recursive definitions of two indices that quantify the “average number of embodied production stages” and the “distance to final demand”.  Miller and Temurshoev (2015), by analogy with Antras et al. (2012), use the logic of the APL and derive the measures of “output upstreamness” and “input downstreamness” that indicate industry relative position with respect to the nal users of outputs and initial producers of inputs. They show that their measures are mathematically equivalent to those of Fally and the well known indicators of, respectively, total forward linkages and total backward linkages. Fally (2012) indicates that the average number of embodied production stages may be split to account for the stages taking place within the domestic economy and abroad. This approach was implemented in OECD (2012), De Backer and Miroudot (2013) and elaborated in Miroudot and Nordstrom (2015).

Ye et al. (2015) generalize previous length and distance indices and propose a consistent accounting system to measure the distance in production networks between producers and consumers at the country, industry and product levels from different economic perspectives. Their “value added propagation length” may be shown to be equal to Fally’s embodied production stages and Miller & Temurshoev’s input downstreamness when aggregated across producing industries.

Finally, Wang et al. (2016) develop a technique of additive decomposition of the average production length. Therefore, they are able to break the value chain into various components and measure the length of production along each component. Their production length index system includes indicators of the average number of domestic, cross-border and foreign production stages. They also propose new participation and production line position indices to clearly identify where a country or industry is in global value chains. Importantly, Wang et al. (2016) clearly distinguish between average production length and average propagation length, and between shallow and deep global value chains.

This paper builds on the technique and ideas of Wang et al. (2016) and the derivation of the weighted average number of border crossings by Muradov (2016). It re-invents a holistic system of analytical indicators of structure and length of value chains. As in Wang et al. (2016), global value chains are treated here within a wider economy context and are juxtaposed with domestic value chains. This enables developing new indices of orientation towards global value chains. The novel deliverables of this paper are believed to include the following. First, all measurements are developed with respect to output rather than value added or final product  flows. This is superior for interpretation and visualization purposes because a directly observable economic variable ( output ) is decomposed in both directions, forwards to the destination and backwards to the origin of value chain. It is also shown that at a disaggregate country-industry level, the measurement of production length is equivalent with respect to value added and output. Second, the decomposition of output builds on a factorization of the Leontief and Ghosh inverse matrices that allows for an explicit count of production stages within each detailed component. Third, the system builds on a refined classication of production stages, including final and primary production stages that are often neglected in similar studies. Fourth, the paper re-designs the average production line position index and proposes new indices of orientation towards global value chains that, hopefully, avoid overemphasizing the length of some unimportant cross-border value chains. Fifth, a new chart is proposed for the visualization of both structure and length of value chains. The chart provides an intuitive graphical interpretation of the GVC participation, orientation and position indices.

It is also worth noting that both Wang et al. (2016) and this paper propose similar methods to estimate the intensity of GVC-related production in partner countries and across borders. This is not possible with previous decomposition systems without explicitly counting the average number of production stages and border crossings.

 

 Key Terms:

  • Average Propagation Length
  • National Boundaries
  • Networks
  • Value Chains
  • Supply Chains
  • Upstreamness
  • Downstreamness
  • Structure of Chains
  • Smile Curves
  • Vertical Specialization
  • Fragmentation of Production
  • Shock Amplifiers
  • Shock Absorbers
  • Production Sharing
  • World Input Output Chains
  • WIOD
  • Counting Boundary Crossings
  • Production Staging
  • Slicing Up Value Chains
  • Mapping Value Chains
  • Geography of Value Chains
  • Spatial Economy

Key Sources of Research:

 

 

Characterizing Global Value Chains

Zhi Wang

Shang-Jin Wei

Xinding Yu and Kunfu Zhu

GLOBAL VALUE CHAIN DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2016
Background Paper Conference

Beijing, 17-18 March 2016

https://schar.gmu.edu/sites/default/files/faculty-staff/cv/Characterizing_Global_Value_Chains.pdf

 

 

The Great Trade Collapse: Shock Amplifiers and Absorbers in Global Value Chains

Zhengqi Pan

2016

http://gpn.nus.edu.sg/file/Zhengqi%20Pan_GPN2016_008.pdf

 

 

CHARACTERIZING GLOBAL VALUE CHAINS:PRODUCTION LENGTH AND UPSTREAMNESS

Zhi Wang
Shang-Jin Wei
Xinding Yu
Kunfu Zhu
March 2017

http://www.nber.org/papers/w23261.pdf

 

 

 

Characterizing Global Value Chains

Zhi Wang
Shang-Jin Wei,
Xinding Yu and Kunfu Zhu

September 2016

http://cepr.org/sites/default/files/Wang,%20Zhi.pdf

https://www.gtap.agecon.purdue.edu/resources/download/8178.pdf

 

 

MEASURING AND ANALYZING THE IMPACT OF GVCs ON ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

GLOBAL VALUE CHAIN DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2017

International Bank for Reconstruction and Development/The World Bank
2017

https://www.brookings.edu/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/tcgp-17-01-china-gvcs-complete-for-web-0707.pdf

 

 

 

Global Value Chains

http://www.coris.uniroma1.it/sites/default/files/Lecture%20Global%20Value%20Chains.pdf

 

 

MAPPING GLOBAL VALUE CHAINS

4-5 December 2012
The OECD Conference Centre, Paris

https://www.oecd.org/dac/aft/MappingGlobalValueChains_web_usb.pdf

 

 

 

Structure and length of value chains

Kirill Muradov

http://www.gws-os.com/downloads/ioworkshop/IO-Workshop-2017_Muradov_abstract.pdf

http://gws-os.com/downloads/ioworkshop/IO-Workshop-2017_Muradov_ppt.pdf

https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3054155

 

Production Staging: Measurement and Facts

Thibault Fally

August 2012

http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.717.7092&rep=rep1&type=pdf

 

 

 

TRACING VALUE-ADDED AND DOUBLE COUNTING IN GROSS EXPORTS

Robert Koopman
Zhi Wang
Shang-Jin Wei

November 2012

https://www0.gsb.columbia.edu/mygsb/faculty/research/pubfiles/5852/w18579.pdf

 

 

 

GIVE CREDIT WHERE CREDIT IS DUE: TRACING VALUE ADDED IN GLOBAL PRODUCTION CHAINS

Robert Koopman
William Powers
Zhi Wang
Shang-Jin Wei

September 2010

https://www.bea.gov/about/pdf/NBER%20working%20paper_1.pdf

 

 

 

Measuring the Upstreamness of Production and Trade Flows

By Pol Antràs, Davin Chor, Thibault Fally, and Russell Hillberry

2012

http://scholar.harvard.edu/files/antras/files/acfh_published.pdf

http://www.nber.org/papers/w17819.pdf

 

 

 

Using Average Propagation Lengths to Identify Production Chains in the Andalusian Economy

 

https://idus.us.es/xmlui/bitstream/handle/11441/17372/file_1.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y

 

 

Production Chains in an Interregional Framework: Identification by Means of Average Propagation Lengths

 2007

 

http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0160017607305366

 

 

 

Vertical Integration and Input Flows

Enghin Atalay

Ali Hortaçsu

Chad Syverson

2013

http://faculty.chicagobooth.edu/chad.syverson/research/verticalownership.pdf

 

 

 

The Rise of Vertical Specialization Trade

Benjamin Bridgman

January 2010

https://www.bea.gov/papers/pdf/the_rise_of_vertical_specialization_trade_bridgman_benjamin.pdf

 

 

 

THE NATURE AND GROWTH OF VERTICAL SPECIALIZATION IN WORLD TRADE

David Hummels
Jun Ishii
Kei-Mu Yi*

March 1999

http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.475.3874&rep=rep1&type=pdf

 

 

Accounting for Intermediates: Production Sharing and Trade in Value Added

Robert C. Johnson

Guillermo Noguera

First Draft: July 2008
This Draft: June 2009

http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.211.9707&rep=rep1&type=pdf

First Draft: July 2008
This Draft: May 2011

http://siteresources.worldbank.org/INTRANETTRADE/Resources/Internal-Training/287823-1256848879189/6526508-1283456658475/7370147-1308070299728/7997263-1308070314933/PAPER_4_Johnson_Noguera.pdf

 

 

 

FRAGMENTATION AND TRADE IN VALUE ADDED OVER FOUR DECADES

Robert C. Johnson
Guillermo Noguera

June 2012

http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.679.6227&rep=rep1&type=pdf

 

 

 

Can Vertical Specialization Explain The Growth of World Trade

Kei-Mu Yi

1999

https://www.newyorkfed.org/medialibrary/media/research/staff_reports/sr96.pdf

 

 

CAN MULTI-STAGE PRODUCTION EXPLAIN THE HOME BIAS IN TRADE?

Kei-Mu Yi

Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia
June 2008
This revision: November 2008

https://www.philadelphiafed.org/-/media/research-and-data/publications/working-papers/2008/wp08-12r.pdf?la=en

 

 

 

Global Value Chains: New Evidence for North Africa

D. Del Prete, G. Giovannetti, E. Marvasi

2016

https://www.disei.unifi.it/upload/sub/pubblicazioni/repec/pdf/wp07_2016.pdf

 

 

 

Slicing Up Global Value Chains

Marcel Timmera Abdul Erumbana Bart Losa
Robert Stehrerb Gaaitzen de Vriesa

Presentation at International Conference on Global Value Chains and
Structural Adjustments,

Tsinghua University, June 25, 2013

http://www.rug.nl/ggdc/docs/session4_timmer.pdf

 

 

 

On the Geography of Global Value Chains

Pol Antràs

Alonso de Gortari

May 24, 2017

https://scholar.harvard.edu/files/antras/files/gvc_ag_latest_draft.pdf

 

 

Counting Borders in Global Value Chains

Posted: 12 Jul 2016

Last revised: 29 Aug 2016

Kirill Muradov

 

https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2808130

 

 

Determinants of country positioning in global value chains

Kirill Muradov

May 2017

https://www.iioa.org/conferences/25th/papers/files/2932_20170627121_Muradov2017_countrypositioninGVC_1.1.pdf

 

 

THE CONSTRUCTION OF WORLD INPUT–OUTPUT TABLES IN THE WIOD PROJECT

ERIK DIETZENBACHERa*, BART LOSa, ROBERT STEHRERb, MARCEL TIMMERa and GAAITZEN DE VRIES

2013

 

https://unstats.un.org/unsd/trade/events/2014/mexico/documents/session6/WIOD%20construction.pdf

 

 

 

 

On the fragmentation of production in the us

Thibault Fally

July 2011

http://www.etsg.org/ETSG2011/Papers/Fally.pdf

http://voxeu.org/article/has-production-become-more-fragmented-international-vs-domestic-perspectives

A New Measurement for International Fragmentation of the Production Process: An International Input-Output Approach

Inomata, Satoshi

http://www.ide.go.jp/English/Publish/Download/Dp/175.html

Output Upstreamness and Input Downstreamness of Industries/Countries in World Production

Ronald E. Miller

Umed Temurshoev

 

Date Written: July 9, 2015

https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2700845

Input-Output Calculus of International Trade

Kirill Muradov

 

Date Written: June 1, 2015

Posted: 9 Sep 2015 Last revised: 5 Oct 2015

https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2643098

 

 

 

 Made in the World?

S. Miroudot

Hakan Nordstrom

Date Written: September 2015

https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2658562

 

 

 

The Average Propagation Length Conflicting Macro, Intra-industry, and Interindustry Conclusions

October 2013
Jan Oosterhaven

Maaike C. Bouwmeester

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/258142955_The_Average_Propagation_Length_Conflicting_Macro_Intra-industry_and_Interindustry_Conclusions

 

 

 

Accounting Relations in Bilateral Value Added Trade

Robert Stehrer

May 2013

https://wiiw.ac.at/accounting-relations-in-bilateral-value-added-trade-dlp-3021.pdf

Whither Panama? Constructing a Consistent and Balanced World SUT System including International Trade and Transport Margins

Robert Stehrer

https://wiiw.ac.at/whither-panama-constructing-a-consistent-and-balanced-world-sut-system-including-international-trade-and-transport-margins-dlp-2905.pdf

https://wiiw.ac.at/p-2905.html

Quantifying International Production Sharing at the Bilateral and Sector Levels

Zhi Wang, Shang-Jin Wei, Kunfu Zhu

NBER Working Paper No. 19677
Issued in November 2013, Revised in March 2014

http://www.nber.org/papers/w19677

Measuring Smile Curves in Global Value Chains

Ming YE, Bo MENG , and Shang-jin WEI

August 2015

http://www.ide.go.jp/English/Publish/Download/Dp/530.html

 

 

 

 FOLLOW THE VALUE ADDED: BILATERAL GROSS EXPORT ACCOUNTING

by Alessandro Borin and Michele Mancini

2015

 

http://www.bancaditalia.it/pubblicazioni/temi-discussione/2015/2015-1026/en_tema_1026.pdf