Cross Border/Offshore Payment, Clearing, and Settlement Systems -Update October 2019

Cross Border Payment, Clearing, and Settlement Systems -Update October 2019

 

There have been several new developments in Cross Border Payments Solutions landscape.

  • Interbank Cross Border Payments
  • Retail Cross Border Payments

 

Interbank Payments

  • Ripple
  • SWIFT
  • SWIFT GPI
  • JPMCoin
  • IBM Blockchain World Wire {BWW}

 

RIPPLE

From {https://digital.hbs.edu/platform-digit/submission/ripple-the-disruptor-to-the-forty-years-old-cross-border-payment-system/}

Cross-border payments today are inefficient, expensive and opaque.

The Global Interbank Financial Telecommunication Company (SWIFT) established in 1973 is still the most widely used method to send cross-border payment using the transmission of financial messages via the international SWIFTNet network.

However, the SWIFT financial messages do not hold accounts for its members nor make any form of clearing or settlement. It essentially only sends payment orders which need to be settled by the correspondent account that the institution has with each other. For this reason, each financial institution needs to have a banking relationship to exchange banking transactions.

This is why it requires 6 players linked up – payer, payer’s bank, payer’s bank’s correspondent, beneficiary bank’s correspondent, beneficiary bank, beneficiary to complete cross-border payments.

[1]

There are many obvious drawbacks of such system:

  • Cross-border payments can be expensive and sometimes even charged a percentage fees
  • Extra fees such as “lifting fees” or correspondent banking fees by intermediary banks are common
  • Bank keep the money for extra time and delay the payout “float money theft”
  • Exchange rate can have big spread

The high processing costs, lengthy settlement times and a poor customer experience prevents many new usage scenarios such as on-demand, low-value cross-border payment or mobile wallets. It is estimated that $1.6T per year for all parties in the ecosystem has spent yet unable to meet today’s cross-border payment need[2].

Ripple Labs (formerly OpenCoin) launched in 2012 with a mission to build a cross-border, interbank payment and settlement network using the concepts behind bitcoin. Ripple offers sub-second cross-border payments with automated best pricing from its network. As payments are nearly instant, it helps to remove the credit and liquidity risk from the process, lowering overall costs considerably.

 How is it done?

The core of its solution is RippleNet, a single, global network of banks that send and receive payments via Ripple’s distributed financial technology — providing real-time messaging, clearing and settlement of transactions.

RippleNet utilizes a subset of blockchain technology used in bitcoin. It uses the consensual validation of encrypted hashes to secure the messages across the Ripple network but does not hold the ledger, unlike bitcoin. Ripple names this open, neural protocol Interledger Protocol (ILP). ILP allows Ripple to connect existing bank ledgers, similarly to how banks connect their core system to the SWIFT network.

 

SWIFT GPI

From https://www.bellin.com/blog/swift-gpi-transparent-cross-border-payments/

Challenges in cross-border payments

Cross-border payments usually pass through several banks until the funds have been transferred from the payer to the account of the beneficiary. This is referred to as correspondent banking. This results in four obstacles that are virtually insurmountable for treasurers as things stand today:

1)   Time: Traditional cross-border payment orders can take several days from being released to being credited – way too long for efficient cash management.

2)   Transparency: Several correspondent banks can act as intermediaries between the bank initiating the payment and the beneficiary bank – an impenetrable banking jungle that causes treasurers sleepless nights for security and compliance reasons.

3)   Tracking: Today, treasurers neither know where a specific payment is located nor when it will be credited to the beneficiary – an incalculable business risk and a situation that often leads to time-consuming queries, trying to chase a payment.

4)   Remittance data: Remittance data is often altered somewhere along the line or information is lost. Sometimes the amount eventually credited to the account does not match the initial payment order because correspondent banks have deducted fees, resulting in a tedious reconciliation process once the money has arrived.

SWIFT global payments innovation – SWIFT gpi

In January 2017, SWIFT introduced the gpi Service that can be used to process global payments in a fast and traceable manner. The objective is for every one of the around 10,000 SWIFT Network banks to be able to offer money transfers within 24 hours with continuous end-to-end tracking and complete transparency along the entire payment chain by the end of 2020. This transparency and efficiency is made possible by using a specific gpi reference, the Unique End-to-End Transaction Reference UETR.

SWIFT GPI Instant Payment Cross Border

How the Unique End-to-End Transaction Reference (UETR) works 

You can compare the UETR to the tracking number of a parcel: The sender issues a unique, unalterable reference that shows you where the order is located at any one time. This reference ensures complete transparency as well as fully digitized and therefore speedy processing. In addition, the sender is automatically notified of any payment status changes. Conventional transfers often drop off the radar for quite some time, and you’re left wondering where your money has gone, not to mention the effort it will take you to retrace and reconcile afterwards.Conversely, gpi transfers generate an abundance of messages that keep you up to date on the status of your payment.

The same applies to the respective bank departments who can also trace corporate payments, enabling them to react to queries much faster. Some banks have integrated functionality in their online banking applications that enables corporate clients to track their gpi payments. Not a bad idea – the only downside is that most corporates use more than one bank for their international payments, which would mean checking several banking portals. This is why a bank-independent treasury management system such as tm5  is a much more elegant solution. All tracking and status information converges in one centralized hub, no matter how many banks are involved.

SWIFT gpi for Corporates (g4C) – new dynamic and transparency in treasury

In November 2018, SWIFT launched the SWIFT g4C project in order to enable corporates to directly benefit from the gpi technology. The objective was to offer corporates a solution for initiating gpi payment orders directly in their payments system. BELLIN was selected as one of the Early Adopters and was the first TMS provider with a client live on g4C. The pilot phase has been completed and the technology is fully integrated in the tm5 treasury management system and BELLIN’s SWIFT offering.

What does this mean for banks and companies?

The role of banks

Banks must be able to process certain information in order for it to be included in gpi payment orders. More than 280 financial institutions worldwide, including 49 of the TOP 50 banks, have agreed on a standardized SLA. With so many banks participating, communication is guaranteed. i.e. funds are transferred quickly from one bank to the next. By now, most banks have started processing cross-border payments as gpi payments.

The role of companies

The UETR is crucial for processing gpi payments. Companies that initiate their own payments, for example through a treasury management system integrated payment solution need to attach this reference to a payment order in line with SWIFT requirements or extend the format of a payment in the right place to include this information. The information transmitted by way of the UETR simplifies reconciliation and can be matched automatically, depending on the system.

BELLIN offers integrated SWIFT g4C technology

The BELLIN treasury management system, tm5, offers integrated SWIFT gpi technology. The system generates the unique and unalterable tracking reference UETR that is required for gpi payments. In addition, tm5 automatically processes incoming gpi status messages, enabling users to check the status of a payment at any time.

Corporates need a SWIFT BIC (Business Identifier Code) to make use of SWIFT g4C technology. They register their BIC for gpi for Corporates and connect financial institutions that offer g4C. All in all, SWIFT g4C unlocks completely new opportunities for automating treasury processes, in turn leading to efficiency gains and increased security.

How will gpi change treasury?

gpi is fast, creates transparency regarding fees and currencies and provides a wealth of information about the location of a payment and other aspects that simplify reconciliation. The SWIFT gpi initiative is clear evidence that corporate payments are moving towards real-time processing. In turn, this will change processes and the way treasurers work.

 

Retail Cross Border Payments Systems

 

Retail Payments/Transfers to India

{From ManiKarthik.com}

  • XOOM
  • Remitify
  • Remitly
  • Ria
  • Western Union
  • State Bank of India
  • Transfast
  • Transwise
  • ICICI Bank Money to India
  • WorldRemit
  • IndusInd Bank

 

Block Chain Based Cross Border Payment Systems

  • AIRFOX
  • CIRCLE PAY
  • ZCASH
  • RIPPLE
  • VEEM
  • IVY
  • GLUWA
  • STELLAR
  • ABRA

 

 

Top Cross Border Payment Companies

{https://www.ventureradar.com/keyword/Cross%20Border%20Payments}

  • Ripple
  • Seedrs
  • CurrencyFair
  • Transferwise
  • Payoneer
  • WorldRemit
  • Trustly Group
  • TransferGo
  • Raisin
  • Zooz
  • TransferMate Global Payments
  • Calastone
  • Airwallex
  • Hufsy
  • InstaReM
  • Caxton
  • Veem
  • nanoPay
  • Credorax
  • Transfast
  • wyre
  • Bitbound GmbH
  • Currency Transfer
  • Earthport PLC
  • Bitso
  • WB21
  • iSignthis
  • Currency Cloud
  • BitPay
  • MoneyTrans
  • Moni
  • Traxpay
  • Qwikwire
  • Streami Inc
  • PiP iT
  • Swych
  • HoneSend
  • Afrimarket
  • Fonmoney
  • Lala World
  • Flime
  • Smart Token Chain
  • TransferTo
  • EQ Global
  • Weeleo
  • SimbaPay
  • KUARIX
  • REMITWARE Payments
  • PingPong
  • Buckzy Payments

 

 

Please see my related posts:

Cross Border/Offshore Payment and Settlement Systems

Instant, Immediate, Real Time Retail Payment Systems (IIRT-RPS)

Evolving Networks of Regional RTGS Payment and Settlement Systems

Large Value (Wholesale) Payment and Settlement Systems around the Globe

Structure and Evolution of EFT Payment Networks in the USA, India, and China

Next Generation of B2C Retail Payment Systems

Understanding Global OTC Foreign Exchange (FX) Market

Sources of Research:

 

Ripple wants a piece of the global payment system

 

https://www.cnbc.com/2019/01/07/ripple-wants-a-piece-of-the-global-payment-system.html

How IBM Blockchain World Wire revolutionizes cross-border payments

IBM

https://www.ibm.com/downloads/cas/YW3W2JPZ

NAVIGATING A WORLD OF PAYMENT SOLUTIONS

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW FOR TODAY — AND TOMORROW

George H. Hoffman, CTP, CERTICM, Senior Vice President, Manager, International Advisory, PNC

Kacie V. Johnson, Assistant Vice President, International Advisor, PNC

 

Click to access navigating-payment-solutions.pdf

Siam Commercial Bank Of Thailand To Use Ripple For Cross-border Payments With Easy Pay App

Siam Commercial Bank Of Thailand To Use Ripple For Cross-border Payments With Easy Pay App

Ripple and Xendpay partner for cross-border payments

https://www.fxcompared.com/magazine/news/ripple-and-xendpay-partner-cross-border-payments

The Future Of Cross-Border Payments

FORBES

Click to access d173.pdf

 

A vision for the future of cross-border payments

McKinsey

 

https://www.mckinsey.com/~/media/McKinsey/Industries/Financial%20Services/Our%20Insights/A%20vision%20for%20the%20future%20of%20cross%20border%20payments%20final/A-vision-for-the-future-of-cross-border-payments-web-final.ashx

FASTER, CHEAPER, SAFER: 9 COMPANIES USING BLOCKCHAIN PAYMENTS

https://builtin.com/blockchain/blockchain-payments

Global Payments 2020: Transformation and Convergence

BNY Mellon

Click to access global-payments-2020-transformation-and-convergence.pdf

 

Top 10 Trends in Payments 2018 : What You Need to Know

Cap Gemini 2018

Click to access payments-trends_2018.pdf

 

 

Strategies for Improving the U.S. Payment System

Federal Reserve Next Steps in the Payments Improvement Journey

Click to access other20170906a1.pdf

 

 

SWIFT gpi: A New Era in Treasury

Fast, transparent, traceable and system-integrated cross-border payments

https://www.bellin.com/blog/swift-gpi-transparent-cross-border-payments/

 

 

The Use of RMB in International Transactions:

-Background, Development and Prospect

Click to access pdf-rmb-JinZhongxia.pdf

 

 

 

The Cross-Border Payments Landscape

 

Click to access 9308A_1-2018-9-17.pdf

 

 

Swift to test real-time cross border payments in Europe

https://www.finextra.com/newsarticle/33852/swift-to-test-real-time-cross-border-payments-in-europe

 

 

Singtel’s cross-border payments system expands to Japan

The Via cross-border payments system has expanded into Japan thanks to a partnership with Netstars.

https://www.zdnet.com/article/singtels-cross-border-payments-system-expands-to-japan/

 

 

THE FUTURE OF CORRESPONDENT BANKINGCROSS BORDER PAYMENTS

RUTH WANDHÖFER

BARBARA CASU

PUBLICATION DATE: 10 OCTOBER 2018

 

Click to access SIWP-2017-001-The-Future-of-Correspondent-Banking_FINALv2.pdf

 

 

 

How are Asian FIs meeting the challenges and opportunities of cross-border payments?

A Survey on Trends in Cross-Border Payments in Asia Pacific

Click to access TAB_DEUTSCHE_BANK_WHITE_PAPER_-_FI_CROSS_BORDER_PAYMENT.pdf

 

 

 

The Inefficiencies of Cross-Border Payments: How Current Forces Are Shaping the Future

Written by Yoon S. Park, PHD & DBA, George Washington University

VISA

 

Click to access crossborder.pdf

 

 

 

CROSS-BORDER INTERBANK PAYMENT AND SETTLEMENTS

Emerging opportunities for digital transformation

 

Click to access Cross-Border-Interbank-Payments-and-Settlements.pdf

 

 

Global Payment Systems Survey (GPSS)

December 4, 2018
World Bank

https://www.worldbank.org/en/topic/financialinclusion/brief/gpss

 

 

 

Beijing creates its own global financial architecture as a tool for strategic rivalry

Govt of Canada

https://www.canada.ca/en/security-intelligence-service/corporate/publications/china-and-the-age-of-strategic-rivalry/beijing-creates-its-own-global-financial-architecture-as-a-tool-for-strategic-rivalry.html

 

 

 

SWIFT Vs. Ripple — The Importance of Speed in Cross-Border Payments

https://cointelegraph.com/news/swift-vs-ripple-the-importance-of-speed-in-cross-border-payments

 

 

Visa looks to speed up cross-border payments with new network launch

https://www.reuters.com/article/visa-payment/visa-looks-to-speed-up-cross-border-payments-with-new-network-launch-idUSL2N23H1NO

 

 

Cross-border Payment systems: SWIFT, RippleNet or BWW?

 

Cross-border Payment systems: SWIFT, RippleNet or BWW?

 

Rise of the yuan: China-based payment settlements jump 80%

Data shows Beijing attracting countries targeted by US sanctions

https://asia.nikkei.com/Business/Markets/Rise-of-the-yuan-China-based-payment-settlements-jump-80

 

 

 

http://www.cips.com.cn/cipsen/7052/7057/index.html

https://www.treasury-management.com/article/1/355/2929/cips-chinas-hybrid-net-settlement-clearing-system.html

 

 

SWIFT’s Battle For International Payments

Forbes

https://www.forbes.com/sites/francescoppola/2019/07/16/swifts-battle-for-international-payments/#64699a4e758e

 

 

EU Cross Border Payments: An evolving concept

 

Click to access lu-eu-cross-border-payments.pdf

 

 

 

INTERNATIONAL PAYMENTS IN A DIGITAL WORLD

YET ANOTHER BANKING BUSINESS THREATENED BY DIGITALIZATION

Click to access accenture-international-payments-digital-world-international-payments-digital-world.pdf

 

 

 

SWIFT gpi Time for action

Deutche Bank

 

Click to access Deutsche_Bank_SWIFT_gpi_White_Paper_December2017.pdf

 

 

 

B2B Payments and Fintech Guide 2019

Innovations in the Way Businesses Transact

 

Click to access B2B%20Payments%20and%20Fintech%20Guide%202019%20-%20Innovations%20in%20the%20Way%20Businesses%20Transact.pdf

 

 

Paying across borders – Can distributed ledgers bring us closer together?

  • RODRIGO MEJIA-RICART
  • CAMILO TELLEZ
  • MARCO NICOLI

MARCH 26, 2019

https://blogs.worldbank.org/psd/paying-across-borders-can-distributed-ledgers-bring-us-closer-together

 

 

Reinventing Payments

In An Era of Modernization

 

Click to access reinventing-payments-in-an-era-of-modernization.pdf

 

 

 

WORLD PAYMENTSREPORT

2018

 

Click to access World-Payments-Report-2018.pdf

 

 

 

Fundamentals of Global Payment Systems and Practices

Click to access Fundamentals_of_Payment_Systems.pdf

 

 

 

Global Payments 2018

REIMAGINING THE CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE

 

BCG

Click to access BCG-Global-Payments-2018-Oct-2018_tcm9-205095.pdf

 

 

 

Cross-Border Banking in Europe: Implications for Financial Stability and Macroeconomic Policies

CEPR

 

Click to access GenevaP223.pdf

 

 

 

Cross-Border Settlement Systems: Blockchain Models Involving Central Bank Money

Xiaohang Zhao, Haici Zhang, Kevin Rutter, Clark Thompson, Clemens Wan

Click to access CrossBorder_Settlement_Central_Bank_Money_R3-1.pdf

 

HP’s Megatrends

HP’s Megatrends

 

Since 2018, HP has started publishing a report titled Megatrends.  In this report global macro changes are presented.

Macro Forces

  • Socio Economic
  • Demographic
  • Technological

 

There is so much change happening around us today. How we live, work and play in both developed and developing countries will look very different in the next ten to thirty years. Underlying this change are key trends, many having disruptive implications for people and businesses, including HP. It is vitally important that we do our best to discern what the future may look like, developing our own point-of-view on potential future states and their implications, in terms of threats and opportunities. Understanding Megatrends gives us the ability to frame and make more informed, strategic long-term decisions and avoid surprises we could have anticipated and even exploited.

Megatrends are those global socio-economic, demographic and technological forces that we think will have a sustained, transformative impact on the world in the years ahead. On businesses, societies, economies, cultures and our personal lives. Our objective with Megatrends is to directionally point to where the world is going, the potential future states that may result, and then to frame implications in terms of threats and opportunities for Customers and HP. We use Megatrends work to help inform our long-term strategic planning thinking and to support Customer and HP thought leadership and communications with employees, customers, partners and market influencers around technology Vision for the future.

We have identified four major Megatrends and a wide range of underlying sub-trends. We cover each Megatrend and an illustrative set of the sub-trends in this paper.

  • Rapid Urbanization
  • Changing Demographics
  • Hyper Globalization
  • Accelerated Innovation

 

megatrendsmegatrends2

 

Technological Changes

As we move farther into the 21st Century, we see new technologies converging that, together, will generate the same kind of growth. In the process, they will change how the entire world makes, sells and lives.

  • –  BioConvergence: The science of Biology in combination with compute is accelerating. Over the next two decades, the way we make things will change radically. We are seeing the radical acceleration of biology as AI changes how analysis is done and robotics/sensors increase the speed and precision of testing.
  • –  Beyond Human: New sensors and interfaces change the nature of human computer interaction. Over the next decade, the way we do work will be reinvented as computation integrates itself seamlessly into the biological processes of our bodies and cognitive processes of our minds. We are already starting to see the early glimmer of this in wearable sensors, in pace makers, and in voice assistants.
  • Frictionless Business: Technology is changing the size and speed at which transaction and coordination are possible in business processes and markets. In the next ten years, the way business is transacted and coordinated will likely change tremendously. Business processes are being reinvented by concurrent innovation in AI, IoT, Blockchain and applications that automate and create smart- streamlined activities managed by software instead of humans. Markets are also being reinvented when these technologies are used in a distributed (vs. centralized) fashion along with innovative business models.

 

This year’s report [what’s new]
The 2019 HP Megatrends Report explores global, regional and metro income trends, urbanization’s impact on these trends, the resulting rise of new metro-based economic powerhouses, and the role of automation and education in meeting labor market challenges driving changing demographics and growing economies. Additional research explores how increasing incomes are putting a strain on our energy resources and what role technologies such as 3D printing, Software 2.0 and Edge Computing could play in helping to drive to greater efficiencies benefiting customers, industries, and the planet.

megatrends3

Please see my related posts

Strategy | Strategic Management | Strategic Planning | Strategic Thinking

 

Key Sources of Research

 

Megatrends: Shaping the Future

Implications for people and businesses

June 2018

HP

 

Click to access 4AA7-3480ENW.pdf

 

 

MEGATRENDS: PREDICTING THE FUTURE TO REINVENT TODAY

Shane Wall

HP CTO and Global Head of HP Labs

January 25, 2018

 

Click to access 20180125-Megatrends-predicting-the-future-to-reinvent-today.PDF

 

 

Megatrends 2019

HP

https://hpmegatrends.com/megatrends-2019-2eae2fc27ebe

 

LSE Event : Megatrends by Shane Wall

London School of Economics and Political Science

 

 

HP CTO Shane Wall interview — Megatrends, automating jobs, and fighting growing inequality

HP CTO Shane Wall interview — Megatrends, automating jobs, and fighting growing inequality

The Hidden Geometry of Trade Networks

The Hidden Geometry of Trade Networks

 

From The hidden hyperbolic geometry of international trade: World Trade Atlas 1870–2013

Tradenetwork

 

Key Terms:

  • Trade Networks
  • Complex Networks
  • Preferential Attachment
  • Positive Feedback
  • Fractals
  • Power Laws
  • Hyperbolic Geometry
  • Economic Geography
  • Regional Trading Blocks
  • Bilateral Trade
  • Multilateral Trade
  • Free Trade Agreements
  • Metabolism of a City
  • Metabolism of a Nation
  • Metabolism of the World
  • Industrial Ecology
  • Social Ecology
  • Growth and Form

 

 

From The hidden hyperbolic geometry of international trade: World Trade Atlas 1870–2013

Here, we present the World Trade Atlas 1870–2013, a collection of annual world trade maps in which distance combines economic size and the different dimensions that affect international trade beyond mere geography. Trade distances, based on a gravity model predicting the existence of significant trade channels, are such that the closer countries are in trade space, the greater their chance of becoming connected. The atlas provides us with information regarding the long-term evolution of the international trade system and demonstrates that, in terms of trade, the world is not flat but hyperbolic, as a reflection of its complex architecture. The departure from flatness has been increasing since World War I, meaning that differences in trade distances are growing and trade networks are becoming more hierarchical. Smaller-scale economies are moving away from other countries except for the largest economies; meanwhile those large economies are increasing their chances of becoming connected worldwide. At the same time, Preferential Trade Agreements do not fit in perfectly with natural communities within the trade space and have not necessarily reduced internal trade barriers. We discuss an interpretation in terms of globalization, hierarchization, and localization; three simultaneous forces that shape the international trade system.

From The hidden hyperbolic geometry of international trade: World Trade Atlas 1870–2013

When it comes to international trade, the evidence suggests that we are far from a distance-free world. Distance still matters1 and in many dimensions: cultural, administrative or political, economic, and geographic. This is widely supported by empirical evidence concerning the magnitude of bilateral trade flows. The gravity model of trade2–4, in analogy to Newton’s law of gravitation, accurately predicts that the volume of trade exchanged between two countries increases with their economic sizes and decreases with their geographical separation. The precision of that model improves when it is supplemented with other factors, such as colony–colonizer relationships, a shared common language, or the effects of political borders and a common currency5–7. Despite the success of the gravity model at replicating trade volumes, it performs very poorly at predicting the existence of a trade connection between a given pair of countries8; an obvious limitation that prevents it from explaining the striking regularities observed in the complex architecture of the world trade web9–13. One of the reasons for this flaw is that the gravity model focuses on detached bilateral relationships and so overlooks multilateral trade resistance and other network effects14.

Another drawback of the classical gravity model is that geography is not the only factor that defines distance in international trade. Here, we use a systems approach based on network science methodologies15,16 to propose a gravity model for the existence of significant trade channels between pairs of countries in the world. The gravity model is based on economic sizes and on an effective distance which incorporates different dimensions that affect international trade, not only geography, implicitly encoded on the complex patterns of trade interactions. Our gravity model is based on the connectivity law proposed for complex networks with underlying metric spaces17,18 and it can be represented in a pure geometric approach using a hyperbolic space, which has been conjectured as the natural geometry underlying complex networks19–22. In the hyperbolic trade space, distance combines economic size and effective distance into a sole distance metric, such that the closer countries are in hyperbolic trade space, the greater their chance of becoming connected. We estimate this trade distance from empirical data using adapted statistical inference techniques23,24, which allow us to represent international trade through World Trade Maps (WTMs). These define a coordinate system in which countries are located in relative positions according to the aggregate trade barriers between them. The maps are annual and cover a time span of fourteen decades. The collection as a whole, referred to as the World Trade Atlas 1870–2013, is presented via spatial projections25, Table S5, and trade distance matrices, Table S6. Beyond the obvious advantages of visualization, the World Trade Atlas 1870–2013 significantly increases our understanding of the long-term evolution of the international trade system and helps us to address a number of important and challenging questions. In particular: How far, in terms of trade, have countries traveled in recent history? What role does each country play in the maps and how have those roles evolved over time? Are Preferential Trade Agreements (PTAs) consistent with natural communities as measured by trade distances? Has the formation of PTAs led to lesser or greater barriers to trade within blocs? Is trade distance becoming increasingly irrelevant?

The answers to these questions can be summarized by asserting that, in terms of trade, the world is not flat; it is hyperbolic. Differences in trade distances are growing and becoming more heterogeneous and hierarchical; at the same time as they define natural trade communities—not fully consistent with PTAs. Countries are becoming more interconnected and clustered into hierarchical trade blocs than ever before.

Please see my related posts:

Networks and Hierarchies

Increasing Returns, Path Dependence, Circular and Cumulative Causation in Economics

Relational Turn in Economic Geography

Boundaries and Networks

Multilevel Approach to Research in Organizations

Regional Trading Blocs and Economic Integration

Increasing Returns and Path Dependence in Economics

Growth and Form in Nature: Power Laws and Fractals

Key Sources of Research:

 

The hidden hyperbolic geometry of international trade: World Trade Atlas 1870–2013

Guillermo García-Pérez  Marián Boguñá, Antoine Allard & M. Ángeles Serrano

2016

Click to access srep33441.pdf

 

 

Uncovering the hidden geometry behind metabolic networks

 

Molecular BioSystems · March 2012

 

Click to access 1109.1934.pdf

 

 

The hidden geometry of complex networks

M. ÁNGELES SERRANO

 

Click to access s1_to_pdf.pdf

Click to access Curs_Intro_networks.pdf

 

 

 

Deciphering the global organization of clustering in real complex networks

Pol Colomer-de-Simo ́n1, M. A ́ ngeles Serrano1, Mariano G. Beiro ́2, J. Ignacio Alvarez-Hamelin2 & Maria ́n Bogun ̃a ́1

 

Click to access srep02517.pdf

 

 

 

 

 

Hidden geometric correlations in real multiplex networks

 

Kaj-KoljaKleineberg,1,∗ Mari ́anBogun ̃ ́a,1 M.A ́ngelesSerrano,2,1 andFragkiskosPapadopoulos

Click to access 1601.04071.pdf

 

 

 

 

 

Emergent Hyperbolic Network Geometry

Ginestra Bianconi1 & Christoph Rahmede

 

Click to access srep41974.pdf

 

 

 

 

The geometric nature of weights in real complex networks

 

Antoine Allard1,2, M. A ́ngeles Serrano1,2,3, Guillermo Garc ́ıa-Pe ́rez1,2 & Maria ́n Bogun ̃a ́

Click to access ncomms14103.pdf

 

 

 

Network Geometry and Complexity

Daan Mulder · Ginestra Bianconi

 

Click to access 1711.06290.pdf

 

 

 

Multiscale unfolding of real networks by geometric renormalization

 

Guillermo Garc ́ıa-P ́erez,1,2 Mari ́an Bogun ̃ ́a,1,2 and M. A ́ngeles Serrano

 

Click to access 1706.00394.pdf

 

 

 

Topology of the World Trade Web

Ma A ́ngeles Serrano and Mari ́an Bogun ̃a ́

 

Click to access 0301015.pdf

 

 

Patterns of dominant flows in the world trade web

 

M. A ́ngeles Serrano,1 Mari ́an Bogun ̃ ́a,2 and Alessandro Vespignani3,4

 

Click to access 0704.1225.pdf

 

 

 

 

Clustering and the hyperbolic geometry of complex networks

Elisabetta Candellero and Nikolaos Fountoulakis

 

Click to access paper8waw14.pdf

 

 

 

 

Hyperbolic Geometry of Complex Networks

 

Dmitri Krioukov, Fragkiskos Papadopoulos, Maksim Kitsak, Amin Vahdat, and Mari ́an Boguna

Click to access hyperbolic_geometry_complex.pdf

 

 

 

 

 

On Hyperbolic Geometry Structure of Complex Networks

Wenjie Fang

 

Click to access 531c6644768ad78e86843e297fed442769cb.pdf

 

USA and China: What are Trade in Value Added (TiVA) Balances

USA and China: What are Trade in Value Added (TiVA) Balances

 

Changes in Global Trade

  • Global Value Chains
  • Production Fragmentation
  • Vertical Specialization
  • Value added content of Trade

 

FROM INTERCONNECTED ECONOMIES : BENEFITING FROM INDUSTRY GLOBALISATION

TIVA4TIVA5

 

From Domestic Value Added in Chinese Exports

 

TIVA12

 

From Measurement and Determinants of Trade in Value Added

 

TIVA11

 

From OECD WTO TIVA

TIVA13

 

Ongoing TiVA Projects

  • OECD TIVA Initiative
  • EU FIGARO Initiative
  • NA TIVA Initiative
  • APEC TiVA Initiative

 

There is also OECD TiVA – MNE Project which incorporates Intra Firm trade of MNEs.

 

From An Overview on the Construction of North American Regional Supply-Use and Input-Output Tables and their Applications in Policy Analysis

Introduction

Trade-in-Value Added (TiVA) is a statistical approach used to measure the interconnectivity and marginal contribution in production of participating economies in global value chains (GVCs) (Degain and Maurer, 2015). The advantage of TiVA over traditional trade statistics is that TiVA measures trade flows consistent with internationally, vertically integrated global production networks, often called GVCs. TiVA statistics allow us to better analyze three aspects of international trade: measuring the contribution of domestic versus foreign intermediates in the exports, tracing production across countries to their final destination, and finally quantifying how individual industries contribute to producing exports (Lewis, 2013).

TiVA statistics allow us to map and quantify the interdependencies between industries and economies, and help us develop better estimates of the contribution from each country in the production processes and, consequently, better measure the impact from GVC engagement for domestic economies. However, it is necessary to highlight the underlying compilation methodology of TiVA in order to better understand the characteristics, scope and interpretation of TiVA. Hence, it is important to remember that TiVA statistics are estimated statistics that are derived, in part, from official statistics. TiVA statistics are meant to complement but not to replace official statistics.

Measuring trade flows in value added as opposed to gross value of trade flows has become increasingly important as the influence that GVCs has on international trade continues to rise. (Johnson, 2014; Ahmad and Ribarsky, 2014). The proliferation of GVCs means that production has become increasingly fragmented and vertically integrated across countries (Jones and Kierzkowski, 1988; Hummels, Ishii, and Yi, 2001; OECD, 2013). At the micro level, this means that many firms in disparate countries are interconnected. Across international borders, these firms take part in particular stages of the production process, together forming a global supply chain. As a result, intermediate inputs may cross international borders several times before being used to produce final consumable goods. This matters for several reasons. First, when goods cross multiple borders multiple times, they are exposed to more trade costs, which accumulate and compound before the goods are sold for final consumption. Additionally, traditional gross trade flows are overstated because gross trade flows may count intermediates multiple times. Relatedly, gross trade flows obscure the marginal contributions of countries along GVCs. TiVA measures the flows related to the value that is added at each stage of production by each country and maps from where value is created, where it is exported, and how it is used, as final consumption or as an input for future exports. How we understand gains from trade from trade flows is fundamental, and value-added approaches lead to better understanding of GVCs and their role in international trade.

There are two ways to capture TiVA. The first method is a direct approach, which decomposes existing data on trade statistics. Johnson (2012) introduce a TiVA indicator using value-added to output ratios from the source country to compute the value-added associated with the implicit output transfer to each destination. Koopman, Wang, and Wei (2014) build on the literature in vertical specialization (e.g. Hummels, Ishii, and Yi 2001) and the literature on TiVA (e.g. Johnson and Noguera, 2012; Daudin, Rifflart, and Schweisguth, 2011) to implement a complete decomposition of a country’s gross exports by value added components. This work has evolved into a second, indirect method of capturing TiVA. The indirect method is employed in the regional North American supply-use table (NASUT) and the regional North American inter-country input-output table (NAIOT). Estimating TiVA this way relies on national and international input-output tables as well as bilateral trade statistics to derive the international intermediate and final supply-demand matrices. These matrices reveal the origin and use of goods and services produced and exchanged among the countries and industries within the table domain. Other major international input-output tables include the Asian International Input-Output (AIO) Tables published by the Institute of Developing Economies Japan External Trade Organization (IDE-JETRO), the Inter-Country Input-Output (ICIO) Tables published by the OECD, the World Input-Output Tables (WIOT) published by the World Input-Output Database (WIOD) project, and the Eora Multi-region Input-Output Database (Eora MRIO).

The studies based on the above two approaches have revealed a trend of rising foreign value-added content in international trade flows and the resulting implications for trade policies. Johnson and Noguera (2016) find that value-added exports are falling relative to gross exports, which means that double-counting is increasingly more common in trade flows. This is consistent with increased GVC activity. Hummels, Ishii, and Yi (2001) show that vertical specialization has grown about 30 percent and accounts for about one-third of the growth in trade from about 1970 to 1990.

In recent years, more than half of global manufacturing imports are intermediate goods and more than 70 percent of global services imports are intermediate services (OECD, 2013). This is relevant because tariffs (and other trade costs) have a higher impact on the cost of GVC activity. Each time an intermediate input crosses an international border as part of the production process, the input incurs trade costs. As first observed by Yi (2003), trade costs are compounded when intermediate goods cross borders multiple times to complete the production process. Rouzet and Miroudot (2013) demonstrate that small tariffs can add up to a significant sum by the time a finished product reaches its consumers. Other trade costs such as non-tariff measures also have such accumulative effect on downstream products.

What the literature indicates the trends in GVCs mean for trade flows, generally, are two-fold. First, with the growth of GVC activity, gross value of trade flows will continue to be larger than the value of final goods that cross borders. Second, trade policy designed with respect to gross trade flows could have the potential to be overly restrictive or even impose costs indirectly on domestic production. Trade-in-Value Added thus provides a supplementary, relevant reference for evaluating the economic effect of trade policies.

In this paper, we introduce the North American Trade-in-Value Added (NA-TiVA) project, a trilateral, multiyear initiative that aims to produce a regional TiVA database that maps the value chains connecting Canada, the United States, and Mexico. Furthermore, we introduce and discuss the project’s deliverables, the agencies involved, how the NA-TiVA project complements other ongoing TiVA initiatives around the world, the technical framework for producing a regional inter-country input-output table for the NA region, and the value of this work to resolving open policy questions within international trade.

Ongoing TiVA Initiatives

Currently there are three major ongoing global and regional TiVA projects that are related to the North America TiVA project. They are the World Input-Output database (WIOD), OECD-WTO TiVA, and APEC TiVA initiatives.

The World Input-Output database (WIOD): The official WIOD project ran from May 1, 2009 to May 1, 2012, as a joint effort of eleven European research institutions. It was funded by the European Commission. Under the official WIOD project, the accounting framework and methodologies of constructing the TiVA databases, as well as the first version of the World Input-Output database were developed. The database was officially launched in April 2012. Since then, two additional versions of WIOD databases, namely the 2013 and 2016 Releases, were published. The 2016 Released database covers 28 EU countries and 15 other major economies in the world for years 2000-2014 with 56 industries.

The OECD-WTO TiVA database: The Organization for Economic Cooperate and Development (OECD) and World Trade Organization (WTO) undertook a joint initiative on TiVA in 2013. Since then, two versions of TiVA databases have been released (2013 and 2015 release). The 2015 release of OECD-WTO TiVA database covers 61 countries and 13 regions, with 34 industries, for years 1995, 2000, 2005, 2008-2011.

APEC TiVA initiative: In 2014, APEC economic leaders endorsed the APEC TiVA database initiative, a four-year project co-led by China and the United States. Under this project, an APEC TiVA database would be constructed by the end of 2018, covering 21 APEC economies.

Each of these three major global and regional TiVA initiatives include Canada, Mexico, and the United States. In the light of this, why is there still a need for constructing the NA TiVA database? What kind of additional value can the NA TiVA project bring to this global and regional network of TiVA initiatives?

The NA-TiVA project was motivated by regional statistical developments and continuous improvements in compiling TiVA databases. The 2003 Mexican input-output table distinguishes trade flows by domestic producers and production undertaken in Maquiladoras, a tax-free, tariff-free special processing zone, which allowed the estimates of separate production coefficients and thus TiVA measures for these two distinctive zones in Mexico (Koopman, Powers, Wang, and Wei, 2010; De la Cruz, Koopman, Wang, and Wei, 2011). The government of Canada further highlighted the importance and relevance of global value chains in the publication of a book assessing the impact and implication of GVCs (Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada, 2011); and as of the 2015 edition of the OECD’s ICIO tables, Mexico is broken out as Mexico Global Manufacturers and Mexico Non-Global Manufacturers. This NA TiVA project builds off of these developments.

Constructing inter-country input-output tables, or so called TiVA databases, requires the harmonization of national supply-use tables (SUTs) or input-output tables (IOTs) as well as bilateral trade statistics from different countries. However, the data produced by countries often vary greatly in the level of detail and differ in industry and product classifications. Thus, the more countries are included in a global or regional TiVA project, the higher level of aggregation would be required for the purpose of harmonization. With only three countries involved, it is feasible for the NA TiVA database to include more products and sectors than other global and regional TiVA projects.

Moreover, other factors, such as all three countries adopt the same industry and product classifications (e.g. using the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS)), and produce SUTS at similarly detailed levels, would ensure the compatibility of data components, and thus lead to better quality of the resulting NA TiVA database.

Finally, the NA TiVA project could synthesize the ongoing trilateral trade statistics reconciliation effort and produce better-quality balanced bilateral trade data to feed into other global and regional TiVA initiatives. One of the key inputs for constructing TiVA databases is balanced bilateral trade statistics. However, countries rarely report symmetric bilateral trade statisticsone country’s reported exports rarely equals its trading partner’s reported imports, and vice versa. To reconcile such asymmetries to produce balanced bilateral trade statistics, joint effort by both trading countries is warranted, including investigating the causes of asymmetries at detailed product level and making corresponding adjustment mechanically. However, global and regional TiVA initiatives often have to consider an incredible number of country pairs, making such an elaborate reconciliation practice rather infeasible. Thus, global and regional TiVA initiatives often turn to economic modelling to balance bilateral trade statistics which could be applied in a systematic way to all countries. Although such approach can be mathematically sound, the resulting data often require additional scrutiny, validation, and adjustment, as they do not always reflect the reality accurately. Canada, Mexico, and the United States have ongoing bilateral trade reconciliation. This NA TiVA project provides additional motivation and framework for this effort.

The History, Scope, and Major Objectives of the NA TiVA Initiative

In October 2014, the representatives from the United States, Canada, and Mexico met and kicked off the idea of constructing the NA TiVA database at a UN conference in Mexico. The main objective of this project is to construct the NA TiVA database by 2021 covering three NA countries with more detailed industry and firm information, and to improve the quality of TiVA measures for the value chains in the NA region.

The NA-TiVA project involves eight government agencies across the three NA countries: for Canada, Statistics Canada (STATCAN) and Global Affairs Canada; for Mexico, Instituto Nacional de Estadística y Geografía (INEGI) and Banco de Mexico; and for the United States, the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA), the U.S. Census Bureau (CENSUS), the U.S. International Trade Commission (USITC), and the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR).

In addition, because the resulting NA-TiVA database would be eventually integrated into the OECD-WTO TiVA database to improve the quality of information on the North American region, participants of the NA-TiVA project regularly meet with OECD representatives to harmonize TiVA database compilation methodologies, exchange data to synthesize the effort and ensure consistency across countries, and discuss best practices. Other international organizations, such as United Nations Statistics Division (UNSD), and WTO, are often consulted as well for national account and trade statistics related issues.

Under the NA-TiVA initiative, three parallel work streams have been established: The trade in goods and services reconciliation team, which is tasked to produce balanced bilateral trade statistics for goods and services; the SUT team, whose goal is to harmonize the national SUTs and compile the regional NASUTs and NAIOTs; and the White Paper team, the goal of which is to produce documentation that outlines the conceptual methodology, identifies major technical issues, describes policy applications of a NA-TiVA initiative, and details project outputs as well as future work.

FROM INTERCONNECTED ECONOMIES :BENEFITING FROM INDUSTRY GLOBALISATION

 

TIVA6

 

 

From Supply-Use Tables, Trade-in-Value-Added Initiatives, and their Applications

TIVATIVA2TIVA3

Please see my related posts:

Understanding Global Value Chains – G20/OECD/WB Initiative

The Collapse of Global Trade during Global Financial Crisis of 2008-2009

Development of Global Trade and Production Accounts: UN SEIGA Initiative

Trends in Intra Firm Trade of USA

Understanding Trade in Intermediate Goods

Intra Industry Trade and International Production and Distribution Networks

Production Chain Length and Boundary Crossings in Global Value Chains

 

Key Sources of Research:

The U.S.-China Bilateral Balance In Trade In Value Added

2017

https://seekingalpha.com/article/4048166-u-s-china-bilateral-balance-trade-value-added

 

 

 

 

Understanding the US-China Trade Relationship

Prepared for the US-China Business Council By Oxford Economics

January 2017

 

Click to access OE%20US%20Jobs%20and%20China%20Trade%20Report.pdf

 

 

 

Implications and Interpretations of Value-Added Trade Balances

John B. Benedetto

2012

 

Click to access implicationsand.pdf

 

 

The U.S.–China trade deficit—a value-added perspective

Demetrio Scopelliti

BLS

2013

Click to access u-s-china-trade-deficit.pdf

 

 

 

The value-added content of trade

Robert Johnson, Guillermo Noguera

07 June 2011

 

https://voxeu.org/article/value-added-content-trade-new-insights-us-china-imbalance

 

 

 

Trade in Value-Added

December 3, 2013

Logan Lewis

 

https://www.federalreserve.gov/econresdata/notes/ifdp-notes/2013/trade-in-value-added-20131203.html

 

 

 

 

China-U.S. Trade Issues

Wayne M. Morrison

Specialist in Asian Trade and Finance
April 2, 2018

FAS

Click to access RL33536.pdf

 

 

 

The China Shock revisited: Insights from value added trade flows

Adam Jakubiky Victor Kummritzz

June 30, 2017

Click to access jk_draft.pdf

 

 

 

 

Measurement and Determinants of Trade in Value Added

Nakgyoon Choi

2013

https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2317706

 

 

 

 

OECD-WTO: Statistics on Trade in Value Added

OECD

https://www.oecd-ilibrary.org/trade/data/oecd-wto-statistics-on-trade-in-value-added_data-00648-en

 

 

 

 

NAFTA, VALUE ADDED AND TRADE-IN-TASKS

Antonio Rodriguez-Lopez

Click to access nafta-essays-rodriguez-lopez.pdf

 

 

 

Trade in Value Added and the Value Added in Trade

Robert Stehrer

Click to access Stehrer_background_2.pdf

 

 

 

 

US Trade Wars with Emerging Countries in the 21st Century: Make America and Its Partners Lose Again

Antoine Bouët (International Food Policy Research Institute, Washington, D.C., and Groupe de Recherche en Économie Théorique et Appliquée [GREThA], University of Bordeaux, France)
David Laborde (International Food Policy Research Institute)

2017

Click to access article_us_tradewars_bouet_laborde_2017.pdf

 

 

 

Measuring Value Added in the People’s Republic of China’s Exports: A Direct Approach.

Xing, Y.

2014.

ADBI Working Paper 493. Tokyo: Asian Development Bank Institute

Click to access adbi-wp493.pdf

 

 

 

 

International Trade Costs, Global Supply Chains and Value-added Trade in
Australia

Gerard Kelly and Gianni La Cava
RDP 2014-07

 

Click to access rdp2014-07.pdf

 

 

 

Trade in Value Added Revisited: A Comment on R. Johnson and G. Noguera,
Accounting for Intermediates: Production Sharing and Trade in Value Added

 

Masaaki Kuboniwa
January, 2014

 

Click to access DP598.pdf

 

 

 

 

How iPhone Widens the US Trade Deficits with PRC

Yuqing Xing
And
Neal Detert

Nov 2010

Click to access 10-21.pdf

 

 

 

 

Trade in value added (TIVA)

2012

Click to access trade-in-value-added-2012.pdf

 

 

Global Value Chains (GVCs)

OECD

http://www.oecd.org/sti/ind/global-value-chains.htm

 

 

 

INTERCONNECTED ECONOMIES: BENEFITING FROM GLOBAL VALUE CHAINS

SYNTHESIS REPORT

OECD

Click to access interconnected-economies-GVCs-synthesis.pdf

 

 

 

TRACING THE VALUE ADDED IN GLOBAL VALUE CHAINS:
PRODUCT-LEVEL CASE STUDIES IN CHINA

UNCTAD

Click to access ditctncd2015d1_en.pdf

 

 

 

 

The Growth of Chinese Exports:
An Examination of the Detailed Trade Data

Brett Berger
Robert F. Martin

US Federal Reserve

Click to access ifdp1033.pdf

 

 

 

 

Comparing Trade Performance of China and India

Sarah Y TONG

Click to access Vol1No1_SarahTong.pdf

 

 

 

 

Trade in Value Added : China

OECD WTO

2015

Click to access CN_2015_China.pdf

 

 

 

Value-Added Trade and Its Implications for International Trade Policy

Kemal Derviş, Joshua P. Meltzer, and Karim Foda

https://www.brookings.edu/opinions/value-added-trade-and-its-implications-for-international-trade-policy/

 

 

 

 

Bilateral Trade Balances with China: A Matter of Accounting

Submitted by Dana Vorisek

co-authors: Tianli Zhao

On Thu, 02/05/2015

http://blogs.worldbank.org/prospects/bilateral-trade-balances-china-matter-accounting

 

 

 

Value-Added Exports and U.S. Local Labor Markets:
Does China Really Matter?

Leilei Sheny
Peri Silvaz

WTO

August 2017

Click to access silva_e.pdf

 

 

 

HOW MUCH OF CHINESE EXPORTS IS REALLY MADE IN CHINA? ASSESSING
DOMESTIC VALUE-ADDED WHEN PROCESSING TRADE IS PERVASIVE

 

Robert Koopman
Zhi Wang
Shang-Jin Wei

NBER

June 2008

Click to access w14109.pdf

 

 

 

 

GIVE CREDIT WHERE CREDIT IS DUE:
TRACING VALUE ADDED IN GLOBAL PRODUCTION CHAINS

Robert Koopman
William Powers
Zhi Wang
Shang-Jin Wei

September 2010

Click to access w16426.pdf

 

 

 

SPIDERS AND SNAKES:
OFFSHORING AND AGGLOMERATION IN THE GLOBAL ECONOMY

Richard Baldwin
Anthony Venables

December 2010

Click to access w16611.pdf

 

 

 

TRADING TASKS: A SIMPLE THEORY OF OFFSHORING

Gene M. Grossman
Esteban Rossi-Hansberg

December 2006

http://www.nber.org/papers/w12721

 

 

 

 

PRODUCTION CHAINS

David K. Levine

December 2010

Click to access w16571.pdf

 

 

 

AN ELEMENTARY THEORY OF GLOBAL SUPPLY CHAINS

Arnaud Costinot
Jonathan Vogel
Su Wang

April 2011

Click to access w16936.pdf

 

 

 

TRADE-IN-GOODS AND TRADE-IN-TASKS:
AN INTEGRATING FRAMEWORK

Richard Baldwin
Frédéric Robert-Nicoud

April 2010

Click to access w15882.pdf

 

 

Measurement of Trade in Value-Added: using Chinese Input-output Tables
Capturing Processing Trade

Yang Cuihong1, Chen Xikang1, Duan Yuwan1, Jiang Xuemei1, Pei Jiansuo3, Xu Jian2,
Yang Lianling1, Zhu Kunfu1

 

Click to access STS024-P3-S.pdf

 

 

 

Adjusted China-US Trade Balance

Lawrence J. Lau, Xikang Chen and Yanyan Xiong

March 2017

Click to access igef%20working%20paper%20no.%2054%20english%20version.pdf

 

 

 

Domestic Value Added in Chinese Exports

Hiau Looi Kee and Heiwai Tang

World Bank and Tufts University
December 2011

Click to access session2-tang-presentation.pdf

 

 

 

NETWORKS OF VALUE ADDED TRADE

2015
João Amador | Sónia Cabral

Bank of Portugal

Click to access wp201516.pdf

 

 

 

 

Processing Trade, Exchange Rates and China’s Bilateral Trade Balances

Yuqing Xing

Jan 2011

 

Click to access 10-30.pdf

 

 

 

Trade in Value Added
WTO TiVA Profiles

Regional Workshop on
International Merchandise Trade Statistics
11-13 September 2017
Suzhou, China

UNSD

Click to access Agenda%20item%2019%20(c)%20-%20WTO.pdf

 

 

 

 

FRAGMENTATION AND TRADE IN VALUE ADDED OVER FOUR DECADES

Robert C. Johnson
Guillermo Noguera

June 2012

Click to access w18186.pdf

 

 

 

 

TRACING VALUE-ADDED AND DOUBLE COUNTING IN GROSS EXPORTS

Robert Koopman
Zhi Wang
Shang-Jin Wei

November 2012

Click to access w18579.pdf

 

 

 

 

ORGANIZING THE GLOBAL VALUE CHAIN

Pol Antràs
Davin Chor

June 2012

 

Click to access w18163.pdf

 

 

 

 

OFFSHORING: GENERAL EQUILIBRIUM EFFECTS ON WAGES, PRODUCTION
AND TRADE

Richard Baldwin
Frederic Robert-Nicoud

March 2007

 

Click to access w12991.pdf

 

 

 

 

TRADING TASKS: A SIMPLE THEORY OF OFFSHORING

Gene M. Grossman
Esteban Rossi-Hansberg

December 2006

Click to access w12721.pdf

 

 

 

 

Trade in Value Added: Developing New Measures of Cross-Border Trade

World Bank

2013

Click to access 786210PUB0REPL00Box377348B00PUBLIC0.pdf

 

 

 

 

Trade in Value Added

Maria Borga Jiemin Guo

BEA Advisory Committee

May 10, 2013

 

Click to access 0613_borga_guo_trade_in_value.pdf

 

 

 

 

Trade in value added Concepts, applications and challenges

Training Workshop on Trade in Services Negotiations for AU-CFTA Negotiators
Nairobi, Kenya

WTO

Click to access ditc-ted-Nairobi-24082015-WTO-liberatore-2.pdf

 

 

 

Trade in Value-Added: I-O approach and the domestic content of exports

UNSD

 

https://unstats.un.org/unsd/trade/globalforum/trade-value-added.asp

 

 

 

 

TRADE IN VALUE-ADDED: WTO-OECD DATABASE

Courtesy of Sébastien Miroudot (OECD)

UNESCAP

Click to access cbtr9-sebastien.pdf

 

 

 

 

TRADE IN VALUE-ADDED: CONCEPTS, METHODOLOGIES AND CHALLENGES
(JOINT OECD-WTO NOTE)

OECD WTO

Click to access 49894138.pdf

 

 

 

 

Trade in Value Added and the Value Added in Trade

WIOD

Working Paper Number: 8
Author: Robert Stehrer

Click to access wiod8.pdf

 

 

 

Measuring Trade in Value-Added

Draft Chapter 9

Meeting of Group of Experts on National Accounts –
Interim meeting on Global Production
Geneva, 3-4 April 2013

Click to access Working_Paper_9.pdf

 

 

 

Trade in Value Added: The Challenge of International Trade Statistics
With an Empirical Study on Trade in Norway and the Netherlands 2000-2012

Ida Helene Berg

https://www.duo.uio.no/bitstream/handle/10852/40975/BergIdaHelene.pdf?sequence=9

 

 

 

Trade in Value-Added and Comparative Advantage

DrRadford Schantz

25thINFORUM Conference
Riga

August 28-September 2, 2017

Click to access usa_schantz_2017_slides.pdf

 

 

 

Trade in Value Added: An East Asian Perspective.

Inomata, S.

2013.

ADBI Working Paper 451. Tokyo: Asian Development Bank Institute.

Click to access adbi-wp451.pdf

 

 

 

 

Global Value Chains and Trade in Value-Added: New Insights, Better Policies

Ken Ash

March 2013

 

https://www.worldeconomics.com/papers/Global%20Value%20Chains%20and%20Trade%20in%20ValueAdded_f7fe83a3-ec02-4180-9b02-04d1d85bb59a.paper

 

 

 

OECD WORK ON GLOBAL VALUE CHAINS AND TRADE IN VALUE ADDED

Koen De Backer

2013

Click to access 130627_de_backer.pdf

 

 

 

 

The Value-added Structure of Gross Exports and Global Production Network

Robert Koopman and Zhi Wang
United States International Trade Commission

Shang-Jin Wei, Columbia University, CEPR and NBER

Click to access 5839.pdf

 

 

 

Singapore’s Trade in Value Added:
Importance and Implication of Information from the OCED-WTO TiVA Database

Mun–Heng TOH

 

Click to access 2582_20160412091_Singapore_TiVA.pdf

 

 

 

 

Value added and participation in Global Value Chains:
the case of Spain

Marta Solaz
Universitat de Valencia

Fourth World KLEMS Conference, 23-24 May 2016

Click to access worldklems2016_Solaz_slides.pdf

 

 

 

 

Trade in Value Added (TiVA): December 2016

OECD

https://stats.oecd.org/index.aspx?queryid=75537

 

 

 

 

An Overview on the Construction of North American Regional Supply-Use and Input-Output Tables and their Applications in Policy Analysis

Statistics Canada
Anthony Peluso
U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis
Gabriel Medeiros
Jeffrey Young
U.S. International Trade Commission
Ross J. Hallren
Lin Jones
Richard Nugent
Heather Wickramarachi

ECONOMICS WORKING PAPER SERIES
Working Paper 2017-12-A

Click to access ecwp-2017-12-a-12-12-17-as-pdf_0.pdf

 

 

 

 

C. The rise of global value chains

World Trade Report

2014

Click to access wtr14-2c_e.pdf

 

 

 

 

MEASURING VALUE IN GLOBAL VALUE CHAINS

Rashmi Banga

UNCTAD
May 2013

Click to access ecidc2013misc1_bp8.pdf

 

 

 

 

Highlights and Challenges of Measuring Global Production

Tom Howells
Federal Economic Statistics Advisory Committee
Suitland Federal Center

June 9, 2017

Click to access Howells-Presentation.pdf

 

 

 

 

Value added trade: A tale of two concepts

Robert Stehrer

The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies (wiiw)
Version: 2012-12-09

December 10-11, 2012 – CompNet workshop
ECB Frankfurt, Germany.

 

http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.361.9428&rep=rep1&type=pdf

 

 

 

Summary Report of the Fifth Meeting of
APEC Technical Group of Measurement on TiVA under GVCs

August 2017

Click to access 20170901142536597.pdf

 

 

 

 

Trade in value added: do we need new measures of competitiveness?

Kirsten Lommatzsch, Maria Silgoner and Paul Ramskogler

2016

https://www.ecb.europa.eu/pub/pdf/scpwps/ecbwp1936.en.pdf?54d5d8210e9e26ed5bf65d4279223622

 

 

 

 

Who Faces the Risk of Collateral Damage from U.S. Tariffs?

wells Fargo

March 2018

Click to access collateral-damage-20180326.pdf

 

 

 

 

Supply-Use Tables, Trade-in-Value-Added Initiatives, and their Applications

William Powers

ADB Supply and Use Tables Validation Workshop

Bangkok, Thailand
30 June, 2016

https://wpqr4.adb.org/dm/atom/library/_Psut_RMain/document/_Psut_RPageLibrary48257E1F0010578E_D0819CE5DCD76117148257FE2002C81CC_ATiVA_5f2016_5fPowers.pdf/media

 

 

 

 

CHAPTER 13. APPLICATIONS OF EXTENDED SUPPLY AND USE TABLES:
CONSTRUCTING GLOBAL SUPPLY AND USE AND INPUT-OUTPUT TABLES

UNSD

 

Click to access Chapter%2013%20-%20Applications%20for%20Global%20Tables.pdf

 

 

 

 

APEC: Trade in Value Added under Global Value Chains

Erich H. Strassner

2ndStatistics Conference “Measuring the Economy in a Globalized World”
Santiago, Chile
3-4 October 2017

http://www.bcentral.cl/documents/20143/926189/4.2.%28Strassner%29.pdf/d18bab8d-2331-3af2-fcc5-e877c1722880

 

 

 

CURRENT DEVELOPMENTS AND FUTURE EXPANSIONS OF
TRADE IN VALUE-ADDED PROJECT IN OECD

Norihiko YAMANO

2016

Click to access current_developments_trade_valueadded_yamano.pdf

 

 

 

 

Estimating Extended Supply-Use Tables in Basic Prices with Firm Heterogeneity for the United States:A Proof of Concept

Lin Z. Jones and ZhiWang (USITC)
James J. Fetzer, Thomas F. Howells III, Erich H. Strassner (BEA)

The Fourth World KLEMS Conference
Madrid, Spain
May 23-24, 2016

Click to access worldklems2016_Strassner_slides.pdf

 

 

 

 

 

Work Plan for the Technical Group for the Measurement of APEC TiVA Under GVCs
Purpose: Information

Submitted by: China, United States
First Committee on Trade and Investment Meeting
Clark, Philippines
3-4 February 2015

Click to access CONTENT50694276526.pdf

 

 

 

 

APEC in 2014

Click to access NewDirections-05apec.pdf

 

 

 

Global value chains and trade in value added

EUROSTAT

http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/statistics-explained/index.php/Global_value_chains_and_trade_in_value_added

 

 

 

Services and Manufacturing : Patterns of Linkages

Expert Group Meeting on “Global Value Chains, Regional Integration and Sustainable Development: Asia-Pacific Perspectives”

12 Dec 2014 – UNESCAP, Bangkok

Click to access EGM-Session%203-Andre%20Wirjo.pdf

 

 

 

The 3rd Capacity Building Workshop on Strategic Framework on Measurement of APEC TiVA under GVCs and its Action Plan

APEC

2017

https://aimp2.apec.org/sites/PDB/Lists/Proposals/DispForm.aspx?ID=2012

 

 

 

 

Capacity Building Workshop on Strategic Framework on Measurement of APEC TiVA under GVCs and its Action Plan

APEC

2016

https://aimp2.apec.org/sites/PDB/Lists/Proposals/DispForm.aspx?ID=1831

 

 

 

 

Enhancing Value Chains An Agenda for APEC

CSIS

2013

Click to access EnhancingValueChains%20Report.pdf

 

 

 

Changing Patterns of Trade and Global Value Chains in Postcrisis Asia

Ganeshan Wignaraja

Juzhong Zhuang

Mahinthan J. Mariasingham

Madeline Dumaua-Cabauatan

2017

Click to access changing-patterns-trade-gvc.pdf

 

 

 

Global value chains in a changing world

Edited by Deborah K. Elms and Patrick Low

WTO

Click to access aid4tradeglobalvalue13_e.pdf

 

 

 

 

Trade in value added: Concepts, estimation and analysis,

Javorsek, Marko; Camacho, Ignacio

(2015) :

ARTNeT Working Paper Series, No. 150

Click to access 826594735.pdf

 

 

 

India’s Future in Asia: The APEC Opportunity

By Harsha V. Singh and Anubhav Gupta

 

Click to access ASPI_APEC_fullreport_online.pdf

 

 

 

Update on New Measurements of the Impacts of Globalization

James J. Fetzer and Thomas F. Howells III

Advisory Committee Meeting
Washington, DC
November 13, 2015

 

Click to access update-on-new-measurements-of-the-impacts-of-globalization.pdf

 

 

 

 

ASIA-PACIFIC
TRADE AND INVESTMENT REPORT 2016
Recent Trends and Developments

Shamshad Akhtar

Hongjoo Hahm

Susan F. Stone

Copyright © United Nations 2016

Click to access aptir-2016-full.pdf

 

 

 

 

Asia’s Rise in the
New World Trade Order
The Effects of Mega-Regional Trade Agreements on Asian Countries
Part 2 of the GED Study Series:
Effects of Mega-Regional Trade Agreements

 

Click to access NW_Asia_s_Rise_in_the_New_World_Trade_Order.pdf

 

 

 

The role of different types of firms in GVCs

GGDC 25th Anniversary Conference

 

Stephen Chong, Rutger Hoekstra, Oscar Lemmers, Ilke Van Beveren, Marcel van den Berg, Ron van der Wal, Piet Verbiest

Click to access presentation_lemmers.pdf

 

 

 

GLOBAL VALUE CHAINS AND SOUTH-SOUTH TRADE

UNCTAD

Click to access gdsecidc2015d1_en.pdf

 

 

 

 

Annex 5: Strategic Framework on Measurement of
APEC TiVA Under GVCs

APEC

Click to access 14_som2_049anx05.pdf

 

 

 

 

Estimating Extended Supply-Use Tables in Basic Prices with Firm Heterogeneity for the United States: A Proof of Concept

James J. Fetzer, Thomas F. Howells III, Lin Z. Jones, Erich H. Strassner, and Zhi Wang1

The Fourth World KLEMS Conference
Madrid, Spain
May 23-24, 2016

Click to access worldklems2016_Strassner.pdf

 

 

 

 “Participation of Developing Countries in Global Value Chains: Implications for Trade and Trade-Related Policies”

Kowalski, P. et al.

(2015),

OECD Trade Policy Papers, No. 179,
OECD Publishing, Paris

Click to access OECD_Trade_Policy_Papers_179.pdf

 

 

 

 

Complex Network Analysis for Characterizing Global Value Chains in Equipment Manufacturing.

Xiao H, Sun T, Meng B, Cheng L

(2017)

PLoS ONE 12(1):

Click to access pone.0169549.pdf

 

 

 

A Network of Networks Perspective on Global Trade.

Maluck J, Donner RV

(2015)

PLoS ONE 10(7)

Click to access pone.0133310.pdf

 

 

 

Trends of the World Input and Output Network of Global Trade.

del RõÂo-Chanona RM, Grujić J, Jeldtoft Jensen H

(2017)

PLoS ONE 12(1):

Click to access pone.0170817.pdf

 

 

 

World Input-Output Network.

Cerina F, Zhu Z, Chessa A, Riccaboni M

(2015)

PLoS ONE 10(7):

Click to access pone.0134025.pdf

 

 

 

FAQ on GVCs: some answers from the Global I-O tables approach

Rita Cappariello,

 

Click to access Rita-Cappariello.pdf

 

 

 

 

 

A Markovian model of evolving world input-output network.

Moosavi V, Isacchini G

(2017)

PLoS ONE 12(10):

Click to access pone.0186746.pdf

 

 

 

 

Hierarchicality of Trade Flow Networks Reveals Complexity of Products.

Shi P, Zhang J, Yang B, Luo J

(2014)

PLoS ONE 9(6):

Click to access pone.0098247.pdf

 

 

 

International Trade Modelling Using Open Flow Networks: A Flow-Distance Based Analysis.

Shen B, Zhang J, Li Y, Zheng Q, Li X
(2015)

PLoS ONE 10(11):

Click to access pone.0142936.pdf

 

 

 

THE EVOLVING GEOGRAPHY OF PRODUCTION HUBS AND REGIONAL VALUE CHAINS ACROSS EAST ASIA: TRADE IN VALUE-ADDED

G. Suder (Melbourne Business School), P. Liesch (UQ), S. Inomata (JETRO- IDE), I. Jormanainen (Aalto University) and B. Meng (JETRO- IDE and OECD),

For: Journal of World Business

 

https://minerva-access.unimelb.edu.au/bitstream/handle/11343/159095/The%20evolving%20geography%20of%20production%20hubs%20and%20regional%20value%20chains%20across%20East%20Asia-%20Trade%20in%20value-added.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y

 

 

 

 

AN ICIO SPLIT ACCORDING TO DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN OWNERSHIP:
THE OECD TIVA-MNE PROJECT

Charles Cadestin, Koen De Backer, Isabelle Desnoyers-James,
Sébastien Miroudot, Davide Rigo and Ming Ye

OECD

2017

Click to access 2757_20170515071_Cadestin_et_al_2017_ICIO_split_ownership.pdf

 

 

 

 

THE FIGARO PROJECT: THE EU INTER-COUNTRY SUPPLY, USE AND INPUT-OUTPUT TABLES

 

Click to access 2504_20160519071_Item10-12_FIGAROproject.pdf

 

 

Identifying Heterogeneity in the Production Components of Globally Engaged Business Enterprises in the United States

James Fetzer and Erich H. Strassner

June 10, 2015

US BEA

 

Click to access identifying-heterogeneity-in-the-production-components-of-globally-engaged-business-enterprises-in-the-united-states.pdf

 

 

The EU Inter-country Supply, Use and Input-Output Tables (FIGARO Project): Recent progress

Prepared by Eurostat

2017

Click to access 3_-_FIGARO_project.pdf

 

 

Tracing value-added and double counting in sales of foreign affiliates and domestic-owned companies

Sebastien Miroudot and ming ye

Trade and Agriculture Directorate, OECD, Trade and Agriculture Directorate, OECD

14 March 2018

Click to access MPRA_paper_85723.pdf

 

Identifying Heterogeneity in the Production Components of Globally Engaged Business Enterprises in the United States

Prepared by Bureau of Economic Analysis, U.S. Department of Commerce

2015

 

Click to access 11_Identifying_Heterogeneity__US_.pdf

 

 

 

 

Estimating Extended Supply-Use Tables in Basic Prices with Firm Heterogeneity for the United States: A Proof of Concept (Draft)

Prepared by the United States

2017

 

Click to access 7_-_Estimating_Extended_Supply-Use_Tables_in_Basic_Prices.pdf

 

 

TIVA: CONSTRUCTING THE ICIO TABLE AND FUTURE WORK

 

Fabienne Fortanier (Head of Trade Statistics, OECD) Christophe Degain (Senior Statistician, WTO)

OECD

Click to access Session%2012_WTO-OECD%20SUT%20and%20ICIOT%20-%20Training%20module%20(ECA)%20-%20English%20Final.pdf

 

 

 

 

FIGARO
Full International and Global Accounts for Research in Input-
Output analysis
The EU Inter-country Supply, Use and Input-Output Tables

José M. Rueda-Cantuche

Isabelle Rémond-Tiedrez

Item 4, NAWG Meeting, Luxembourg, 11 May 2016

Click to access Item_4d_FIGARO_UNECE_new.pdf

 

 

 

OECD-WTO Trade in Value Added (TiVA) data: introduction

OECD

 

Click to access Session%2011_WTO-OECD%20TiVA%20intro%20-%20Training%20module%20(ECA)%20-%20English%20FINAL.pdf

 

 

 

Trade and Investment Linkages in Global Value Chains: Insights from the new TiVA-MNE Dataset

OECD

2016

 

Click to access trade-investment-linkages-in-gvc.pdf

 

 

INTERCONNECTED ECONOMIES:
BENEFITING FROM INDUSTRY GLOBALISATION

Dirk Pilat,

Global Industry and Economy Forum 2013:
Fostering Industrial Innovation through
Creativity
Seoul, 24 June 2013

 

 

Calculating Trade in Value Added

Prepared by Aqib Aslam, Natalija Novta, and Fabiano Rodrigues-Bastos1

July 2017

IMF

https://www.imf.org/~/media/Files/Publications/WP/2017/wp17178.ashx

 

Measuring Globalization: Global Multi Region Input Output Data Bases (G-MRIO)

Measuring Globalization: Global Multi Region Input Output Data Bases (G-MRIO)

 

A special issue of Economic Systems Research published in 2013 discussed currently available GMRIO data bases.  There are two strands of research in development and use of these databases:

  • Trade flows and global supply chains
  • Environmental Impacts of Economic Growth, Trade and Globalization

 

G-MRIO

  • IDE JETRO Asian IO Tables
  • EORA
  • OECD Inter-Country Input-Output (ICIO) tables
  • GRAM (Global Resource Accounting Model )
  • World Input-Output Database (WIOD).
  • Global Trade Analysis Project (GTAP)
  • EXIOPOL (EXIOBASE)

 

Another recent development is development of Trade in Value added databases analyzing trade flows of intermediate goods and fragmented global supply chains and production networks.  These projects are currently underway at the time of writing of this post.

TIVA Databases

  • NA TiVA Project
  • The OECD-WTO TiVA database
  • APEC TiVA initiative

 

There are also EE- GMRIO (Environmentally extended GMRIO) discussed else where in a related post.

 

GMRIO Databases

 

GRAM

The Global Resource Accounting Model (GRAM) is a multi-regional input-output model (MRIO), which currently distinguishes between 62 countries and one ‘rest of the world’ region and 48 industrial sectors per country or region. The heart of the model is made up of OECD data on bilateral trade flows and input-output tables for 1995 to 2010. Combined with additional data sets, such as CO2 emissions and material extraction, the model enables production-related variables to be attributed to end consumption.

 

 

GLOBAL MULTIREGIONAL INPUT–OUTPUT FRAMEWORKS: AN INTRODUCTION AND OUTLOOK

Arnold Tukker & Erik Dietzenbacher
Published online: 21 Mar 2013
This review is the introduction to a special issue of Economic Systems Research on the topic of global multi regional input–output (GMRIO) tables, models, and analysis. It provides a short historical context of GMRIO development and its applications (many of which deal with environmental extensions) and presents the rationale for the major database projects presented in this special issue. Then the six papers are briefly introduced. This is followed by a concluding comparison of the characteristics of the main GMRIO databases developed thus far and an outlook of potential further developments.

 

COMPILATION AND APPLICATIONS OF IDE-JETRO’S INTERNATIONAL INPUT–OUTPUT TABLES

Bo Meng , Yaxiong Zhang & Satoshi Inomata
Published online: 21 Mar 2013
International input–output (IO) tables are among the most useful tools for economic analysis. Since these tables provide detailed information about international production networks, they have recently attracted considerable attention in research on spatial economics, global value chains, and issues relating to trade in value added. The Institute of Developing Economies at the Japan External Trade Organization (IDE-JETRO) has more than 40 years of experience in the construction and analysis of international IO tables. This paper explains the development of IDE-JETRO’s multi-regional IO projects including the construction of the Asian International Input–Output table and the Transnational Inter regional Input–Output table between China and Japan. To help users understand the features of the tables, this paper also gives examples of their application.

 

 

EXIOPOL – DEVELOPMENT AND ILLUSTRATIVE ANALYSES OF A DETAILED GLOBAL MR EE SUT/IOT

Arnold Tukker , Arjan de Koning , Richard Wood , Troy Hawkins , Stephan Lutter , Jose
Published online: 21 Mar 2013
EXIOPOL (A New Environmental Accounting Framework Using Externality Data and Input–Output Tools for Policy Analysis) was a European Union (EU)-funded project creating a detailed, global, multi regional environmentally extended Supply and Use table (MR EE SUT) of 43 countries, 129 sectors, 80 resources, and 40 emissions. We sourced primary SUT and input–output tables from Eurostat and non-EU statistical offices. We harmonized and detailed them using auxiliary national accounts data and co-efficient matrices. Imports were allocated to countries of exports using United Nations Commodity Trade Statistics Database trade shares. Optimization procedures removed imbalances in these detailing and trade linking steps. Environmental extensions were added from various sources. We calculated the EU footprint of final consumption with resulting MR EE SUT. EU policies focus mainly on energy and carbon footprints. We show that the EU land, water, and material footprint abroad is much more relevant, and should be prioritized in the EU’s environmental product and trade policies.

 

 

A MULTI-REGION INPUT–OUTPUT TABLE BASED ON THE GLOBAL TRADE ANALYSIS PROJECT DATABASE (GTAP-MRIO)

Robbie M. Andrew & Glen P. Peters
Published online: 21 Mar 2013
Understanding the drivers of many environmental problems requires enumerating the global supply chain. Multi-region input–output analysis (MRIOA) is a well-established technique for this purpose, but constructing a multi-region input–output table (MRIOT) can be a formidable challenge. We constructed a large MRIOT using the Global Trade Analysis Project (GTAP) database of harmonised economic, IO, and trade data. We discuss the historical development of the GTAP-MRIO and describe its efficient construction. We provide updated carbon footprint estimates and analyse several issues relevant for MRIO construction and applications. We demonstrate that differences in environmental satellite accounts may be more important than differences in MRIOTs when calculating national carbon footprints. The GTAP-MRIO is a robust global MRIOT and, given its easy availability and implementation, it should allow the widespread application of global MRIOA by a variety of users.

 

 

THE CONSTRUCTION OF WORLD INPUT–OUTPUT TABLES IN THE WIOD PROJECT

Erik Dietzenbacher , Bart Los , Robert Stehrer , Marcel Timmer & Gaaitzen de Vries
Published online: 21 Mar 2013
This article describes the construction of the World Input–Output Tables (WIOTs) that constitute the core of the World Input–Output Database. WIOTs are available for the period 1995–2009 and give the values of transactions among 35 industries in 40 countries plus the ‘Rest of the World’ and from these industries to households, governments and users of capital goods in the same set of countries. The article describes how information from the National Accounts, Supply and Use Tables and International Trade Statistics have been harmonized, reconciled and used for estimation procedures to arrive at a consistent time series of WIOTs.

 

 

BUILDING EORA: A GLOBAL MULTI-REGION INPUT–OUTPUT DATABASE AT HIGH COUNTRY AND SECTOR RESOLUTION

Manfred Lenzen , Daniel Moran , Keiichiro Kanemoto & Arne Geschke
Published online: 21 Mar 2013
There are a number of initiatives aimed at compiling large-scale global multi-region input–output (MRIO) tables complemented with non-monetary information such as on resource flows and environmental burdens. Depending on purpose or application, MRIO construction and usage has been hampered by a lack of geographical and sectoral detail; at the time of writing, the most advanced initiatives opt for a breakdown into at most 129 regions and 120 sectors. Not all existing global MRIO frameworks feature continuous time series, margins and tax sheets, and information on reliability and uncertainty. Despite these potential limitations, constructing a large MRIO requires significant manual labour and many years of time. This paper describes the results from a project aimed at creating an MRIO account that represents all countries at a detailed sectoral level, allows continuous updating, provides information on data reliability, contains table sheets expressed in basic prices as well as all margins and taxes, and contains a historical time series. We achieve these goals through a high level of procedural standardisation, automation, and data organisation.

 

 

POLICY-RELEVANT APPLICATIONS OF ENVIRONMENTALLY EXTENDED MRIO DATABASES – EXPERIENCES FROM THE UK

Thomas Wiedmann & John Barrett
Published online: 21 Mar 2013
The impressive development in global multi-region input–output (IO) databases is accompanied by an increase in applications published in the scientific literature. However, it is not obvious whether the insights gained from these studies have indeed been used in political decision-making. We ask whether and to what extent there is policy uptake of results from environmentally extended multi-region IO (EE-MRIO) models and how it may be improved. We identify unique characteristics of such models not inherent to other approaches. We then present evidence from the UK showing that a policy process around consumption-based accounting for greenhouse gas emissions and resource use has evolved that is based on results from EE-MRIO modelling. This suggests that specific, policy-relevant information that would be impossible to obtain otherwise can be generated with the help of EE-MRIO models. Our analysis is limited to environmental applications of global MRIO models and to government policies in the UK.

 

From GLOBAL MULTIREGIONAL INPUT–OUTPUT FRAMEWORKS: AN INTRODUCTION AND OUTLOOK

GMRIO

 

From POLICY-RELEVANT APPLICATIONS OF ENVIRONMENTALLY EXTENDED MRIO  DATABASES – EXPERIENCES FROM THE UK

GMRIO2

From Economic Systems Research

Volume 26, 2014 – Issue 3: A Comparative Evaluation of Multi-Regional Input-Output Databases

CONVERGENCE BETWEEN THE EORA, WIOD, EXIOBASE, AND OPENEU’S CONSUMPTION-BASED CARBON ACCOUNTS

Daniel Moran & Richard Wood
Published online: 14 Jul 2014

In this paper, we take an overview of several of the biggest independently constructed global multi-regional input–output (MRIO) databases and ask how reliable and consonant these databases are. The key question is whether MRIO accounts are robust enough for setting environmental policies. This paper compares the results of four global MRIOs: Eora, WIOD, EXIOBASE, and the GTAP-based OpenEU databases, and investigates how much each diverges from the multi-model mean. We also use Monte Carlo analysis to conduct sensitivity analysis of the robustness of each accounts’ results and we test to see how much variation in the environmental satellite account, rather than the economic structure itself, causes divergence in results. After harmonising the satellite account, we found that carbon footprint results for most major economies disagree by<10% between MRIOs. Confidence estimates are necessary if MRIO methods and consumption-based accounting are to be used in environmental policy-making at the national level.

COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF MRIO DATABASES

Satoshi Inomata & Anne Owen

Published online: 11 Aug 2014

This editorial is the introduction to a special issue of Economics Systems Research on the topic of intercomparison of multi-regional input–output (MRIO) databases and analyses. It explains the rationale for dedicating an issue of this journal to this area of research. Then the six papers chosen for this issue are introduced. This is followed by a concluding section outlining future directions for developers and users of MRIO databases.

 

Please see my related posts:

Accounting For Global Carbon Emission Chains

Development of Global Trade and Production Accounts: UN SEIGA Initiative

Stock Flow Consistent Models for Ecological Economics

 

 

Key Sources of Research:

 

The World Input‐Output Database (WIOD): Contents, Sources and Methods

Edited by Marcel Timmer (University of Groningen)

With contributions from:
Abdul A. Erumban, Reitze Gouma, Bart Los, Umed Temurshoev and
Gaaitzen J. de Vries (University of Groningen)
Iñaki Arto, Valeria Andreoni Aurélien Genty, Frederik Neuwahl, José
M. Rueda‐Cantuche and Alejandro Villanueva (IPTS)
Joe Francois, Olga Pindyuk, Johannes Pöschl and Robert Stehrer
(WIIW), Gerhard Streicher (WIFO)

April 2012, Version 0.9

Click to access WIOD_sources.pdf

 

 

 

Analyzing Global Value Chains using the World Input-Output
Database

Bart Los (University of Groningen)
with Marcel Timmer (Groningen), Gaaitzen de Vries
(Groningen) and Robert Stehrer (wiiw Vienna)

BBVA Foundation – Ivie Workshop, October 30, 2017, Valencia

Click to access B.-Los.pdf

 

An Overview on the Construction of North American Regional Supply-Use and Input-Output Tables and their Applications in Policy Analysis

Statistics Canada
Anthony Peluso
U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis
Gabriel Medeiros
Jeffrey Young
U.S. International Trade Commission
Ross J. Hallren
Lin Jones
Richard Nugent
Heather Wickramarachi

ECONOMICS WORKING PAPER SERIES
Working Paper 2017-12-A

Click to access na-tiva_white_paper_for_posting_revised_02-20.pdf

 

 

 

 

The Global MRIO Lab – charting the world economy,

Manfred Lenzen, Arne Geschke, Muhammad Daaniyall Abd Rahman, Yanyan
Xiao, Jacob Fry, Rachel Reyes, Erik Dietzenbacher, Satoshi Inomata, Keiichiro Kanemoto, Bart Los, Daniel Moran, Hagen Schulte in den Bäumen, Arnold Tukker, Terrie Walmsley, Thomas Wiedmann, Richard Wood & Norihiko Yamano

(2017)

Economic Systems Research, 29:2, 158-186

Click to access Lenzen%20et%20al._2017_Economic%20Systems%20Research_The%20Global%20MRIO%20Lab–charting%20the%20world%20economy.pdf

 

 

 

 

INPUT–OUTPUT ANALYSIS: THE NEXT 25 YEARS,

Erik Dietzenbacher, Manfred Lenzen, Bart Los, Dabo Guan, Michael L. Lahr,
Ferran Sancho, Sangwon Suh & Cuihong Yang

(2013)

Economic Systems Research, 25:4, 369-389

Click to access Guan-ESR-2013-IO%20next%2025%20years.pdf

 

 

 

OECD Inter-Country Input-Output (ICIO) Tables, 2016 edition

http://www.oecd.org/sti/ind/inter-country-input-output-tables.htm

 

 

Trade in Value Added

OECD

http://www.oecd.org/sti/ind/measuringtradeinvalue-addedanoecd-wtojointinitiative.htm

 

 

 

The Global Resource Accounting Model (GRAM)
a methodological concept paper

Stefan Giljum a, Christian Lutz b, Ariane Jungnitz b

a Sustainable Europe Research Institute (SERI), Vienna, Austria
b Institute for Economic Structures Research (GWS), Osnabrück, Germany

April 2008

Click to access Giljum_et_al_GRAM_concept_paper_final.pdf

 

 

 

POLICY-RELEVANT APPLICATIONS OF
ENVIRONMENTALLY EXTENDED MRIO DATABASES – EXPERIENCES FROM THE UK,

Thomas Wiedmann & John Barrett

(2013):

Economic Systems Research, 25:1, 143-156

Click to access Wiedmann__Barrett_-_2013_-_Policy-relevant_applications_of_evironmentally_extended_MRIO_databases_-_experiences_from_the_UK.pdf

 

 

THE CONSTRUCTION OF WORLD INPUT–OUTPUT TABLES IN THE WIOD PROJECT,

Erik Dietzenbacher , Bart Los , Robert Stehrer , Marcel Timmer & Gaaitzen de
Vries

(2013)

Economic Systems Research, 25:1, 71-98,

Click to access WIOD%20construction.pdf

 

 

System of Environmental-Economic Accounting 2012— Applications and Extensions

http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/documents/3859598/7789413/KS-01-15-797-EN-N.pdf/9404d9b0-5c2d-48c8-b1e9-2632800162e7

 

 

Calculating Trade in Value Added

IMF

Prepared by Aqib Aslam, Natalija Novta, and Fabiano Rodrigues-Bastos1

July 2017

https://www.imf.org/~/media/Files/Publications/WP/2017/wp17178.ashx

 

 

World Input-Output Network

Federica Cerina, Zhen Zhu, Alessandro Chessa and Massimo Riccaboni

July 1, 2015

Click to access 336.pdf

 

 

 

Making Global Value Chain Research More Accessible

Lin Jones, William Powers, and Ravinder Ubee1

U.S. International Trade Commission, Office of Economics

October 21, 2013

Click to access ec201310a.pdf

 

On the Measurement of Upstreamness and Downstreamness in
Global Value Chains

Pol Antras
Harvard University and NBER
Davin Chor
National University of Singapore

October 30, 2017

Click to access upstream_ac_oct30_2017_withtables.pdf

 

 

 

THE OECD INPUT-OUTPUT DATABASE: 2006 EDITION

STI WORKING PAPER 2006/8

Norihiko Yamano and Nadim Ahmad

Click to access OECD%20Input-Output%20Database.pdf

 

 

 

GLOBAL MULTI REGIONAL INPUT–OUTPUT FRAMEWORKS: AN INTRODUCTION AND OUTLOOK,

Arnold Tukker & Erik Dietzenbacher

(2013)

Econ omic Systems Research, 25:1,1-19

Click to access UNSD%20-%20Tukker%20-%20Overview%20on%20International%20IO%20Tables%20-%202013.pdf

 

THE CONSTRUCTION OF WORLD INPUT–OUTPUT TABLES IN THE WIOD PROJECT,

Erik Dietzenbacher , Bart Los , Robert Stehrer , Marcel Timmer & Gaaitzen de
Vries

(2013)

Economic Systems Research, 25:1, 71-98

Click to access WIOD%20construction.pdf

 

 

 

A review of recent multi-region input–output models used for consumption-based
emission and resource accounting

Thomas Wiedmann

2009

http://wedocs.unep.org/bitstream/handle/20.500.11822/19433/a_review.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y

 

 

World Input-Output Network

Federica Cerina, Zhen Zhu, Alessandro Chessa, Massimo Riccaboni

2015

Click to access pone.0134025.pdf

 

 

A Network of Networks Perspective on Global Trade

Julian Maluck, Reik V. Donner

Click to access pone.0133310.pdf

 

 

 

THE ‘REST OF THE WORLD’ – ESTIMATING THE ECONOMIC STRUCTURE OF MISSING REGIONS IN GLOBAL MULTI-REGIONAL INPUT–OUTPUT TABLES,

Konstantin Stadler, Kjartan Steen-Olsen & Richard Wood

(2014)

Economic Systems Research, 26:3, 303-326

Click to access Stadler,%20Steen-olsen,%20Wood_2015_Unknown_the%20‘%20Rest%20of%20the%20World%20’%20–%20Estimating%20the%20Economic%20Structure%20of%20Missing%20Regions%20in%20Global%20Multi.pdf

 

 

“Trade, Environment, and Growth: Advanced topics in Input-Output Analysis”*

Professor: Erik Dietzenbacher (U. Groningen)

March 9-13, 2015

Click to access outline___trade_growth_and_the_environment_.pdf

 

 

 

 

Wassily Leontief and the discovery of the input-output approach

Click to access memo-18-2016-versjon-2.pdf

 

 

Networks of value added trade,

Amador, João; Cabral, Sónia

(2016)

ECB Working Paper, No. 1931, ISBN 978-92-899-2179-4,

Click to access ecbwp1931.pdf

 

EXIOPOL – DEVELOPMENT AND ILLUSTRATIVE ANALYSES OF A DETAILED GLOBAL MR EE SUT/IOT,

Arnold Tukker , Arjan de Koning , Richard Wood , Troy Hawkins , Stephan
Lutter , Jose Acosta , Jose M. Rueda Cantuche , Maaike Bouwmeester , Jan Oosterhaven ,
Thomas Drosdowski & Jeroen Kuenen

(2013)

Economic Systems Research, 25:1,50-70

Click to access Tukker%20et%20al._2013_Economic%20Systems%20Research_Exiopol%20–%20Development%20and%20Illustrative%20Analyses%20of%20a%20Detailed%20Global%20Mr%20Ee%20SutIot.pdf

 

 

 

The World Input-Output Database (WIOD) project

Robert Stehrer

OECD-WPTSG meeting

November 18, 2009 – OECD, Paris

Click to access 44197850.pdf

 

 

The World Input-Output Database (WIOD): Construction, Challenges and Applications

Abdul Azeez Erumbana, Reitze Goumaa, Bart Losa,b, Robert Stehrerc, Umed
Temurshoevb, Marcel Timmer a,b,*, Gaaitzen de Vries

Paper prepared for World Bank workshop
“The Fragmentation of Global Production and Trade in Value Added”,
June 9-10, 2011.

Click to access PAPER_13_Erumban_Gouma_Los_Stehrer_Temurshoev_Timmer_deVries.pdf

 

The World Input-Output Database: Content, Concepts and Applications.

Timmer, M. P., Dietzenbacher, E., Los, B., Stehrer, R., & de Vries, G. J.

(2014).

GGDC Working Papers; Vol. GD-144).

Click to access gd144.pdf

 

 

Measuring Global Value Chains with the WIOD (World Input-Output Database)

Marcel Timmer

Groningen Growth and Development Centre
University of Groningen
(presentation at OECD conference,
Paris, 21 September, 2010)

Click to access 1-3_Timmer.pdf

 

 

 

Global value chains, trade, jobs, and environment: The new WIOD database

Hubert Escaith, Marcel Timmer

13 May 2012

https://voxeu.org/article/new-world-input-output-database

 

Wassily Leontief and the discovery of the input-output approach

Olav Bjerkholt

2016

Click to access 877412162.pdf

 

 

 

WHO PRODUCES FOR WHOM IN THE WORLD ECONOMY?

Guillaume Daudin (Lille-I (EQUIPPE) & Sciences Po (OFCE), Christine Rifflart, Danielle
Schweisguth (Sciences Po (OFCE))1

This version: July 2009

Click to access WP2009-18.pdf

 

 

 

An Anatomy of the Global Trade Slowdown based on the WIOD 2016 Release

Marcel P. Timmer, Bart Los,
Robert Stehrer, and Gaaitzen J. de Vries

December 2016

Click to access gd162.pdf

Credit Chains and Production Networks

Credit Chains and Production Networks

There are three kind of flows in a Supply Chain

  • Goods
  • Information
  • Financial

 

Credit Terms in a Supplier Buyer contracts determine payment delays which accumulate in current accounts of a Firm.

  • Account Receivables
  • Account Payables

 

Credit Relations

  • Bank to Bank
  • Bank to Firm
  • Firm to Firm

Dyad of Credit Relations

  • Supplier – Buyer

 

Triad of Credit Relations

  • Supplier – Bank – Buyer

Sources of Systemic Risk

  • Failure of a Firm and its impact on Suppliers and Customers (Flow of Goods)
  • Failure of a Bank and its impact on Trade Credit
  • Credit Contraction due to de-risking by the Banks
  • Decline in Correspondent Banking relations and its impact on Trade Finance

 

From Credit Chains and Sectoral Co-movement: Does the Use of Trade
Credit Amplify Sectoral Shocks?

Trade credit is an important source of short-term financing for firms, not only in the U.S., as documented by Petersen and Rajan (1997), but also around the World. For instance, accounts payables are larger than short-term debt in 60 percent of the countries covered by Worldscope. Also, across the world most firms simultaneously receive credit from their suppliers and grant it to their customers, which tend to be concentrated on specific sectors.  These characteristics of trade credit financing have led some authors to propose it as a mechanism for the propagation and amplification of idiosyncratic shocks. The intuition behind the mechanism is straightforward; a firm that faces a default by its customers may run into liquidity problems that force it to default to its own suppliers. Therefore, in a network of firms that borrow from each other, a temporary shock to the liquidity of some firms may cause a chain reaction in which other firms also get in financial difficulties, thus resulting in a large and persistent decline in aggregate activity. This idea was first formalized by Kiyotaki and Moore (1997) in a partial equilibrium setting, and has been recently extended to a general equilibrium environment by Cardoso-Lecourtois (2004), and Boissay (2006) who have also provided evidence of the potential quantitative importance of the mechanism by calibrating their models to the cases of Mexico and the U.S., respectively.

From Ontology of Bankruptcy Diffusion through Trade Credit
Channel

A supply network is a network of entities interacting to transform raw material into finished product for customers. Since interdependencies among supply network members on material, information, and finance are becoming increasingly intensive, financial status of one firm not only depends on its own management, but also on the performance and behaviours of other members. Therefore, understanding the financial flows variability and the material interactions is a key to quantify the risk of a firm. Due to the complex structure and dynamic interactions of modern supply networks, there are some difficulties faced by pure analysis approaches in analyzing financial status of the supply network members and the high degree of nonlinear interactions between them. Mathematical and operation research models usually do not function very well for this kind of financial decision making. These models always start with many assumptions and have difficulties modeling such complex systems that include many entities, relationships, features, parameters, and constraints. In addition, traditional modeling and analysis tools lack the ability to predict the impact of a specific event on the performance of the entire supply network.  Current financial data analysis with large volumes of structure data cannot offer the full picture and intrinsic insights into the risk nature of a company. Motivated by the literature gap in risk monitoring in investment background and limitations of analysis approaches for handling bankruptcy contagion phenomenon, we propose an ontological approach to present a formal, shared conceptualization of this domain knowledge.

From Inter-Firm Trade Finance in Times of Crisis

The severe recession that is hitting the global economy, with very low or even negative growth rates, has caused widespread contractions in international trade, both in developed and developing countries. World Trade Organization (WTO) has forecast that exports will decline by roughly 9% in volume terms in 2009 due to the collapse in global demand brought on by the biggest economic downturn in decades. The contraction in developed countries will be particularly severe with exports falling by 10%. In developing countries, which account for one-third of world trade, exports will shrink by some 2% to 3% in 2009.

The contraction in international trade has been accompanied by a sharp decline in the availability of trade finance. This decline is only partly explained by the contraction in demand: according to a BAFT (Banker’s Association for Trade and Finance) and International Monetary Fund (IMF) joint survey (2009), flows of trade finance to developed countries have fallen by 6% relative to the previous year, more than the reduction in trade flows, suggesting that part of the fall reflects a disruption of financial intermediation. The contraction in value of trade finance has also been accompanied by a sharp increase in its price. Fear that the decline in trade finance and the increase in its cost would accelerate the slowdown of world trade has triggered a number of government initiatives in support of trade finance (Chauffour and Farole,2009).

The situation is especially worrisome for firms operating in developing countries which rely heavily on trade finance to support both their exports and imports.1 With a restricted access to financing and an increased cost of financing, these firms may find difficulties in maintaining their production and trade activities.

 

Please see my related posts:

Supply Chain Finance (SCF) / Financial Supply Chain Management (F-SCM)

Production Chain Length and Boundary Crossings in Global Value Chains

Intra Industry Trade and International Production and Distribution Networks

Understanding Trade in Intermediate Goods

Trends in Intra Firm Trade of USA

Production and Distribution Planning : Strategic, Global, and Integrated

Development of Global Trade and Production Accounts: UN SEIGA Initiative

The Dollar Shortage, Again! in International Wholesale Money Markets

FDI vs Outsourcing: Extending Boundaries or Extending Network Chains of Firms

The Collapse of Global Trade during Global Financial Crisis of 2008-2009

Understanding Global Value Chains – G20/OECD/WB Initiative

Economics of Trade Finance

Balance Sheets, Financial Interconnectedness, and Financial Stability – G20 Data Gaps Initiative

Oscillations and Amplifications in Demand-Supply Network Chains

Contagion in Financial (Balance sheets) Networks

 

Key Sources of Research:

 

LIQUIDITY, BUSINESS CYCLES, AND MONETARY POLICY

Nobuhiro Kiyotaki
London School of Economics

John Moore
Edinburgh University and London School of Economics

27 November 2001

Click to access kimo.pdf

 

 

Credit Cycles

Nobuhiro Kiyotaki; John Moore

The Journal of Political Economy, Vol. 105, No. 2.

(Apr., 1997),

Click to access km.pdf

 

Credit chains

Nobuhiro Kiyotaki (Princeton University)

John Moore (University of Edinburgh)

Date January 1997

Click to access id118_esedps.pdf

Click to access Kiyotaki_CreditChains.pdf

 

 

Credit and Business Cycles

N Kiyotaki

1998

Click to access Credit-and-BusinessCycles.pdf

 

 

Inter-Enterprise Credit and Adjustment  During Financial Crises: The Role of Firm Size

Fabrizio Coricelli

Marco Frigerio

July, 2 2016

Click to access Coricelli%2C%20Fabrizio%20paper.pdf

 

 

Credit chains and bankruptcy propagation in production networks

Stefano Battiston, Domenico Delli Gatti, Mauro Gallegati,
Bruce Greenwald, Joseph E. Stiglitz

2007

Click to access 2007_Credit_Chains.pdf

 

 

Trade Finance in Crisis : Market Adjustment or Market Failure ?

Jean-Pierre Chauffour

Thomas Farole

Date Written: July 1, 2009

https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1437955

Resaleable debt and systemic risk

Jason Roderick Donaldson , Eva Micheler

2018

Click to access Donaldson-Micheler-Resaleable_Debt.pdf

 

Supply chains and credit-market shocks: Some implications for emerging markets,

Jinjarak, Yothin (2013)

ADBI Working Paper Series, No. 443

Click to access 770887406.pdf

 

 

Financial Amplification Mechanisms and the Federal Reserve’s Supply of Liquidity during the Crisis

Asani Sarkar
Jeffrey Shrader

Staff Report no. 431
February 2010

Click to access sr431.pdf

 

 

Aggregate Fluctuations and the Role of Trade Credit

Lin Shao

2017

Click to access swp2017-37.pdf

 

 

Supply Chain Disruptions and Trade Credit

LU Yi OGURA Yoshiaki

TODO Yasuyuki ZHU Lianming

2017

Click to access 17e054.pdf

 

 

Credit Shocks and Aggregate Fluctuations in  an Economy with Production Heterogeneity

Aubhik Khan

Julia K. Thomas

September 2013

Click to access KhanThomasDCTsept2013.pdf

 

 

Financial Frictions in Production Networks

Saki Bigio

Jennifer La’O

February 7, 2013

Click to access FinancialFrictionsNetworks.pdf

 

Working Paper No. 67, April 2016

Click to access WP-67.pdf

 

 

The Origins of Aggregate Fluctuations in a Credit Network Economy

Levent Altinoglu

October 16, 2016

Click to access Altinoglu_JMP_CurrentVersion.pdf

September 30, 2015

Click to access fcb800d01a5b8dce9ed13a4a200bf51f6fed.pdf

 

Consolidated Bibliography

WTO

Click to access aid4tradesupplychain13_biblio_e.pdf

 

 

Propagation of Financial Shocks in an Input-Output Economy with Trade and Financial Linkages of Firms

Shaowen Luo

December 4, 2015

Click to access Luo.pdf

 

FDI, Trade Credit, and Transmission of Global Liquidity Shocks:
Evidence from Chinese Manufacturing Firms

Shu Lin and Haichun Ye

Click to access Lin–Ye_paper.pdf

 

 

Trade Credit, Financing Structure and Growth

Junjie Xia

October 27, 2016

Click to access jmp_oct16.pdf

 

The impact of corporate distress along the supply chain: evidences from United
States

Lucia Gibilaro

Gianluca Mattarocci

Click to access EFMA2017_0526_fullpaper.pdf

 

 

Does credit crunch investments down?
New evidence on the real eects of the bank-lending channel

Federico Cinganoz Francesco Manaresix Enrico Settex

December 2013

Click to access Credit_crunch_investments.pdf

 

Interwoven Lending, Uncertainty, and Liquidity Hoarding

Adam Zawadowski

December 13, 2017

Click to access credit.pdf

 

 

Trade credit: Elusive insurance of rm growth

DENNIS BAMS, JAAP BOS and MAGDALENA PISA*

October 5, 2016

Click to access Trade%20credit%20Elusive%20insurance%20of%20firm%20growth%202016.pdf

 

 

Chain Reactions, Trade Credit and the Business Cycle

Miguel Cardoso-Lecourtois

Click to access up.4593.1075462930.pdf

 

From production networks to geographical economics.

Gérard Weisbuch, Stefano Battiston.

Journal ofEconomic Behavior and Organization, Elsevier, 2007, 64 (3- 4), pp.448

https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-00531863/document

 

 

Production networks and failure avalanches

Gerard Weisbuch
Stefano Battiston

March 5, 2018

Click to access 0507101.pdf

 

 

Self-organised patterns in production networks

Gerard Weisbuch

October 10, 2005

Click to access gwcomplexus.pdf

 

 

Networks : Propagation of Shocks over Economic Networks

Daron Acemoglu

July 22, 2014.

https://economics.mit.edu/files/9790

 

 

Debt-Rank Analysis of Financial Distress Propagation on a Production Network in Japan

FUJIWARA Yoshi
University of Hyogo
TERAI Masaaki
RIKEN
FUJITA Yuji
Turnstone Research Institute, Inc.
SOUMA Wataru
Nihon University

Click to access 16e046.pdf

 

 

Operational causes of bankruptcy propagation in supply chain

Zhongsheng Hua ⁎, Yanhong Sun 1, Xiaoyan Xu

2011

Click to access 48280.pdf

 

 

Propagation of Financial Shocks in an Input-Output Economy with Trade and Financial Linkages of Firms

Shaowen Luo
September 20, 2015

Click to access 10-02-15Luo.pdf

 

 

From Micro to Macro via Production Networks

Vasco M. Carvalho

Click to access carvalho_from_micro.pdf

 

 

Trade Credit and the  Propagation of Corporate Failure: An Empirical
Analysis

Tor Jacobson and Erik von Schedvin
August 2012

Click to access 723939764.pdf

 

CREDIT MARKET DISRUPTIONS AND LIQUIDITY SPILLOVER EFFECTS IN THE SUPPLY CHAIN

Anna M. Costello

August 8, 2017

Click to access costello-anna-acctgcamp2017_0.pdf

 

Modeling defaults of companies in multi-stage supply chain networks

Kamil J.Mizgier, StephanM.Wagner,, JanuszA.Holyst

2010

Click to access Mizgier_etal_InPress_Modeling_defaults_of.pdf

 

 

 

The origins of scale-free production networks

Stanislao Gualdizand Antoine Mandelx

June 28, 2015

Click to access Gualdi.pdf

 

 

Optimization of order policies in supply networks

S. GÄottlich¤ M. Hertyy C. Ringhoferz

August 18, 2008

Click to access FRG-2008-Ringhofer-Christian.FRG_Ringhofer_Orders080814.pdf

 

Financial Instability after Minsky: Heterogeneity, Agent Based Models and Credit
Networks

Domenico Delli Gatti

April 10, 2012

Click to access delli-gatti-domenico-berlin-paper.pdf

 

Measuring the Systemic Risk in Inter firm Transaction Networks

Makoto Hazama
And
Iichiro Uesugi

Click to access wp066.pdf

 

Systemic Risk Assessment in Complex Supply Networks

Anna Ledwoch, Alexandra Brintrup, J¨orn Mehnen, Ashutosh Tiwari

Click to access Ledwoch_etal_SJ_2016_Systemic_risk_assessment_in_complex_supply_networks.pdf

 

TRADE CREDIT DEFAULTS AND LIQUIDITY PROVISION BY FIRMS

Reint Gropp
Frédéric Boissay

2007

Click to access ecbwp753.pdf

 

The future of agent-based modelling.

Matteo Richiardi

Institute for New Economic Thinking and Nuffield College, Oxford, United Kingdom
Collegio Carlo Alberto, Moncalieri, Italy

This draft: June 2015

Click to access abmfuture-v12.pdf

 

 

Financially Constrained Fluctuations in an Evolving Network Economy

Domenico Delli Gatti
Mauro Gallegati
Bruce Greenwald
Alberto Russo
Joseph E. Stiglitz

Click to access DelliGatti%28presentation%29_ABM.pdf

 

 

Credit Chains and Sectoral Comovement: Does the Use of Trade Credit Amplify Sectoral Shocks?

Claudio Raddatz

The World Bank
March, 2007

Click to access Credit_chains_051707_withtables.pdf

 

 

Linkages and spillovers in global production networks: firm-level analysis of the Czech automotive industry

Petr Pavlinek

Pavla Žížalová

https://digitalcommons.unomaha.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1039&context=geoggeolfacpub

 

Ontology of Bankruptcy Diffusion through Trade Credit
Channel

Lin Cheng

Huaiqing Wang

Huaping Chen

Click to access JRPIT44.4.401.pdf

 

OPTIMAL ORDER AND DISTRIBUTION STRATEGIES IN PRODUCTION NETWORKS

Simone Gottlich, Michael Herty, and Christian Ringhofer

Click to access SpringerOpt10.pdf

 

Profitability, Trade Credit and Institutional Structure of Production

Michael Gofman
December 9, 2013

Click to access Supplier-Customer%20Network.pdf

 

The Economics of Information and Financial
Networks

Stefano Battiston
July 22, 2016

Click to access battiston2016information.pdf

 

Supply Chain Perspectives and Issues: A Literature Review

Albert Park
Gaurav Nayyar
Patrick Low

Click to access supply-chain-perspectives-and-issues.pdf

 

 

LIAISONS DANGEREUSES: INCREASING CONNECTIVITY, RISK SHARING, AND SYSTEMIC RISK

Stefano Battiston
Domenico Delli Gatti
Mauro Gallegati
Bruce C. Greenwald
Joseph E. Stiglitz

Click to access w15611.pdf

 

 

Inter-Firm Trade Finance in Times of Crisis

Anna Maria C. Menichini

Click to access WPS5112.pdf

 

 

Reducing the Probability of Bankruptcy Through Supply Chain Coordination

Xiaoyan Xu, Yanhong Sun, and Zhongsheng Hua

2010

Click to access 573eac9d08ae298602e6e77a.pdf

 

 

Pathways towards instability in financial networks

Marco Bardoscia, Stefano Battiston Fabio Caccioli & Guido Caldarelli

2017

Click to access bardoscia2017pathways-1.pdf

 

 

International Credit Supply Shocks

Ambrogio Cesa-Bianchiy Andrea Ferreroz Alessandro Rebuccix

June 16, 2017

https://www.bostonfed.org/-/media/Documents/events/2017/boston-policy-workshop/AlessandroRebucci.pdf?la=en

 

Risk Propagation through Payment Distortion in Supply Chains

Alejandro Serrano

Rogelio Oliva

Santiago Kraiselburd

Click to access 0e6d7dc9d4b4f6bcada884b71562791404ed.pdf

 

 

Payment Defaults and Interfirm Liquidity Provision

https://academic.oup.com/rof/article-abstract/17/6/1853/1591419

 

SYSTEMIC RISK: A SURVEY

BY OLIVIER DE BANDT
AND PHILIPP HARTMANN

November 2000

Click to access ecbwp0035.pdf

 

 

Risk Propagation in Supply Chains

Alejandro Serrano

Rogelio Oliva

Santiago Kraiselburd

Click to access f3278ab2a75ff11b0142fba19a4cf223805a.pdf

 

 

How Inventory Is (Should Be) Financed: Trade Credit in Supply Chains with Demand
Uncertainty and Costs of Financial Distress

Song (Alex) Yang, John R. Birge

Click to access YangBirge_trade%20credit.pdf

https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2746645

https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1734682

 

 

The Supply Chain Effects of Bankruptcy

S. Alex Yang

John R. Birge, Rodney P. Parker

Click to access 86a8667f24af2c6a5cd7eb52bbd12b39697b.pdf

http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.715.5812&rep=rep1&type=pdf

 

Supply Chain Management: Supplier Financing Schemes and Inventory Strategies

Min Wang

Click to access Min_Wang_Dissertation.pdf

 

Foreign Investment and Supply Chains in Emerging Markets: Recurring Problems and Demonstrated Solutions

Theodore H. Moran

PIIE

2014

Click to access wp14-12.pdf

 

Improving cash flow using credit management
The outline case

Click to access cid_improving_cashflow_using_credit_mgm_Apr09.pdf.pdf

 

CREDIT CHAINS AND THE PROPAGATION OF
FINANCIAL DISTRESS

2006

by Frederic Boissay

Click to access ecbwp573.pdf

 

Exposure to international crises: trade vs. financial contagion

Everett Grant

2016

https://www.esrb.europa.eu/pub/pdf/wp/esrbwp30.en.pdf?7b7cc950c1a2286d395ed8489bfde5c7

 

 

Credit Contagion and Trade Credit Supply:
Evidence from Small Business Data in Japan

TSURUTA Daisuke

Click to access 07e043.pdf

 

 

The Price of Complexity in Financial Networks

Joseph Stiglitz

2017

Click to access The%20Price%20of%20Complexity%20in%20Financial%20Networks.pdf

 

 

The Price of Complexity in Financial Networks

S. Battiston

2017

Click to access 160913_slides_battison.pdf

 

 

 

Supply Chain Finance (SCF) / Financial Supply Chain Management (F-SCM)

Supply Chain Finance (SCF) / Financial Supply Chain Management (F-SCM)

 

 

From STANDARD DEFINITIONS FOR TECHNIQUES OF SUPPLY CHAIN FINANCE

fscm8

There are two Areas where FSCM/SCF names are used but in different contexts.

  • Inter firm FSCM
  • Intra firm FSCM

 

Inter firm F-SCM

  • Trade Finance
  • Supply Chain Finance (SCF)
  • Value Chain Finance
  • Supplier Finance
  • Inter firm Finance
  • Reverse Factoring
  • Collaborative  Cash to Cash Cycles Management

During 2008 global financial crisis, the trade financing dried up resulting in decline in trade of goods and services.

Since the crisis, Financial De-globalization and Decline of Correspondent Banking has also made availability of financial credit harder.

Cash flow and working capital management is helped by inter firm collaboration among Suppliers and Buyers.

Financial Institutions which provide trade credit also benefit from inter firm collaboration.

 From SUPPLY CHAIN FINANCE FUNDAMENTALS: What It Is, What It’s Not and How it Works

What Supply Chain Finance is Not

The world of trade finance is complex and varied. There are numerous ways to increase business capital on hand and, in many cases, the differences are slightly nuanced. Given this landscape, it’s not just important to understand what supply chain finance is; it’s also important to understand what it is not.

It is not a loan. Supply chain finance is an extension of the buyer’s accounts payable and is not considered financial debt. For the supplier, it represents a non-recourse, true sale of receivables. There is no lending on either side of the buyer/supplier equation, which means there is no impact to balance sheets.

It is not dynamic discounting or an early payment program. Early payment programs, such as dynamic discounting, are buyer-initiated programs where buyers offer suppliers earlier payments in return for discounts on their invoices. Unlike supply chain finance, buyers are seeking to lower their cost of goods, not to improve their cash flow. Dynamic discounting and early payment programs often turn out to be expensive for both suppliers (who are getting paid less than agreed upon) and buyers who tie up their own cash to fund the programs.

It is not factoring. Factoring enables a supplier to sell its invoices to a factoring agent (in most cases, a financial institution) in return for earlier, but partial, payment. Suppliers initiate the arrangement without the buyer’s involvement. Thus factoring is typically much more expensive than buyer-initiated supply chain finance. Also, suppliers trade “all or nothing” meaning they have no choice to participate from month-to-month to the degree that their cash flow needs dictate. Finally, most factoring programs are recourse loans, meaning if a supplier has received payment against an invoice that the buyer subsequently does not pay, the lender has recourse to claw back the funds.

 

From Mckinsey on Payments

fscm10

 

From Financial Supply Chain Management

financial-supply-chain-management-4-728

 

From Best Practices in Cash Flow Management and Reporting

46_-3571_20

 

From STANDARD DEFINITIONS FOR TECHNIQUES OF SUPPLY CHAIN FINANCE

fscm9

 

From Financing GPNs through inter-firm collaboration?
Insights from the automotive industry in Germany and Brazil

fscm 3

 

Intra Firm F-SCM

  • Working Capital Management
  • Cash Flow Management
  • Liquidity Management
  • Cash to Cash Conversion Cycle Management (C2C Cycle/CCC)
  • Financial Supply Chain Management (F-SCM) in Manufacturing companies
  • Financial Supply chain management in financial institutions
  • Supply Chain Finance
  • Accounts Payable Optimization
  • Accounts Receivable Optimization
  • Operations and Finance Interfaces
  • Current Asset Management (Current Ratio Analysis)

This is not a new subject.  Corporate Finance, Financial Controls, and working capital management have been active business issues.  Benefits of Supply chain management include increase in inventory turnover and decline in current assets.

There are many world class companies who manage their supply chains well and work with minimal working capital.  Lean Manufacturing, Agile Manufacturing, JIT manufacturing are related concepts.  Just-In-Time manufacturing developed in Toyota Corp. reduces inventory portion of C2C cycle.  Other examples include

  • Apple
  • Walmart
  • Dell

Currently, most of the Supply Chain analytics efforts unfortunately do not integrate analysis of financial benefits of operating decisions.

There are many studies recently which suggest that Cash to Cash Conversion Cycle is a better determinant of corporate liquidity.  C2C Cycle is a dynamic liquidity indicator and Current Assets is a static indicator of liquidity.  I would like to point out that none of the studies relate C2C cycle with Current Ratio.  Current Ratio is based on balance sheet positions of current assets and current liabilities.  C2C cycle is based on flows in supply chains.  Accumulation of flow results in Current assets (Stock).  To make it Stock-Flow Consistent, more work is required.

 

From Supply Chain Finance: some conceptual insights.

fscm2

From Financial Supply Chain Management

financial-supply-chain-management-5-728

 

From The Interface of Operations and Finance in Global Supply Chains

fscm4

 

From SUPPLY CHAIN-ORIENTED APPROACH OF WORKING CAPITAL MANAGEMENT

ifscm5

 

From IMPROVING FIRM PERFORMANCE THROUGH VALUE-DRIVEN SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT: A CASH CONVERSION CYCLE APPROACH

fscm6

 

From IMPROVING FIRM PERFORMANCE THROUGH VALUE-DRIVEN SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT: A CASH CONVERSION CYCLE APPROACH

fscm7

 

From THE CYCLE TIMES OF WORKING CAPITAL: FINANCIAL VALUE CHAIN ANALYSIS METHOD

fscm12

 

Call for papers: Supply Chain Finance

Call for papers for Special Topic Forum in Journal of Purchasing and Supply Management (Manuscript Submission:  March 31, 2017)

Supply chain finance is a concept that lacks definition and conceptual foundation.  However, the recent economic downturn forced corporates to face a series of financial and economic difficulties that strongly increased supply chain financial risk, including bankruptcy or over-leveraging of debt.  The mitigation and management of supply chain financial risk is becoming an increasingly important topic for both practitioners and academics leading to a developing area of study known as supply chain finance.  There are two major perspectives related to the idea of managing finance across the supply chain.  The first is a relatively short-term solution that serves as more of a “bridge” and that is provided by financial institutions, focused on accounts payables and receivables.  The second is more of a supply chain oriented perspective – which may or may not involve a financial institution, focused on working capital optimization in terms of accounts payable, receivable, inventory, and asset management.  These longer-term solutions focus on strategically managing financial implications across the supply chain.

Recent years have seen a considerable reduction in the granting of new loans, with a significant increase in the cost of corporate borrowing (Ivashina and Scharfstein, 2010). Such collapse of the asset and mortgage-backed markets dried up liquidity from industries (Cornett et al., 2011). In such difficult times, firms (especially those with stronger bargaining power) forced suppliers to extend trade credit in order to supplement the reduction in other forms of financing (Coulibaly et al., 2013; Garcia-Appendini and Montoriol-Garriga, 2013). The general lack of liquidity, in particular for SMEs, has directly affected companies’ ability to stay in the market, reflecting on the stability of entire supply chains. There are many other factors influencing liquidity and financial health that are critical to assess.

These trends and the continued growth of outsourced spend have contributed considerably to the need for and spread of solutions and programs that help to mitigate and better manage financial risk within and across the supply chain.  One of the most important approaches is what is being termed Supply Chain Finance (SCF) (Gelsomino et al., 2016; Pfohl and Gomm, 2009; Wuttke et al., 2013a). SCF is an approach for two or more organizations in a supply chain, including external service provides, to jointly create value through means of planning, steering, and controlling the flow of financial resources on an inter-organizational level (Hofmann, 2005; Wuttke et al., 2013b).  It involves the inter-company optimization of financial flows with customers, suppliers and service providers to increase the value of the supply chain members  (Pfohl and Gomm, 2009).  According to Lamoureux and Evans (2011) supply chain financial solutions, processes, methods are designed to improve the effectiveness of financial supply chains by preventing detrimental cost shifting and improving the visibility, availability, delivery and cost of cash for all global value chain partners.  The benefits of the SCF approach include reduction of working capital, access to more funding at lower costs, risk reduction, as well as increase of trust, commitment, and profitability through the chain (Randall and Farris II, 2009).

Literature on SCF is still underdeveloped and a multidisciplinary approach to research is needed in this area. In order to better harmonize contributions of a more financial nature with ones coming from the perspective of purchasing & supply chain, there is a need of developing theory on SCF, starting with a comprehensive definition of those instruments or solutions that constitute the SCF landscape. SCF has been neglected in the Purchasing & Supply Management (PSM) literature, although PSM plays a critical role in managing finance within the supply chain.  PSM uses many of the processes and tools that are part of a comprehensive supply chain financial program to better manage the supply base, in terms of relationships, total cost of ownership, cost strategies and pricing volatility (see for example Shank and Govindarajan 1992). Reverse factoring is a technique which is also widely used to manage the supply base (Wuttke et al, 2013a) as is supplier development and investment in suppliers.

Research on SCF from a PSM perspective needs further development. In particular, empirical evidence would prove useful for testing existing models and hypotheses, addressing the more innovative schemes and investigating the adoption level and the state of the art of different solutions. Research is also needed for the development of a general theory of supply chain finance.  There is also limited research that focuses on the link between supply chain financial tools and supply chain financial performance.  Finally, considering the plurality of solutions that shape the SCF landscape, literature should move towards the definition of holistic instruments to choose the best SCF strategy for a supply chain, considering its financial performance and the contextual variables (e.g. structure, bargaining power) that characterize it.

Potential topics

The purpose of this special topic forum is to publish high-quality, theoretical and empirical papers addressing advances on Supply Chain Finance. Original, high quality contributions that are neither published nor currently under review by any other journals are sought. Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Theory development, concept and definition of SCF
  • Taxonomy of SCF solutions
  • Strategic cost management across the supply chain
  • Total cost of ownership
  • Life cycle assessment and analysis
  • Commodity risk and pricing volatility
  • Supply chain financial metrics and measures
  • Cost-benefit analysis
  • Relationship implications of supply chain finance
  • Tax and transfer pricing in the supply chain
  • Foreign exchange and global currency and financing risk
  • Financial network design and financial supply chain flows
  • The organizational perspective on SCF and the implementation process
  • Role of innovative technologies to support SCF ( (e.g. block chain, internet of things)
  • Supply chain collaboration for improved supply chain financial solutions
  • SCF adoption models, enablers and barriers
  • SCF from different party perspectives (especially suppliers and providers)
  • SCF and risk mitigation and management

Manuscript preparation and submission

Before submission, authors should carefully read the Journal’s “Instructions for Authors”. The review process will follow the Journal’s normal practice. Prospective authors should submit an electronic copy of their complete manuscript via Elsevier’s manuscript submission system (https://ees.elsevier.com/jpsm) selecting “STF Supply Chain Finance” as submission category and specifying the Supply Chain Finance topic in the accompanying letter. Manuscripts are due March 31, 2017 with expected publication in June of 2018.

FOR COMMENTS OR QUESTIONS PLEASE CONTACT THE GUEST EDITORS:

Federico Caniato, Politecnico di Milano, School of Management, federico.caniato@polimi.it

Michael Henke, TU Dortmund and Fraunhofer IML, Michael.Henke@iml.fraunhofer.de

George A. Zsidisin, Virginia Commonwealth University, gazsidisin@vcu.edu

References

Cornett, M.M., McNutt, J.J., Strahan, P.E., Tehranian, H., 2011. Liquidity risk management and credit supply in the financial crisis. J. financ. econ. 101, 297–312.

Coulibaly, B., Sapriza, H., Zlate, A., 2013. Financial frictions, trade credit, and the 2008–09 global financial crisis. Int. Rev. Econ. Financ. 26, 25–38.

Garcia-Appendini, E., Montoriol-Garriga, J., 2013. Firms as liquidity providers: Evidence from the 2007–2008 financial crisis. J. financ. econ. 109, 272–291.

Gelsomino, L.M., Mangiaracina, R., Perego, A., Tumino, A., 2016. Supply Chain Finance: a literature review. Int. J. Phys. Distrib. Logist. Manag. 46, 1–19.

Govindarajan, Vijay, and John K. Shank. “Strategic cost management: tailoring controls to strategies.” Journal of Cost Management 6.3 (1992): 14-25.

Wuttke, D. A., Blome, C., Foerstl, K., & Henke, M. (2013a). Managing the innovation adoption of supply chain finance—Empirical evidence from six European case studies. Journal of Business Logistics, 34(2), 148-166.

Wuttke, D. A., Blome, C., & Henke, M. (2013b). Focusing the financial flow of supply chains: An empirical investigation of financial supply chain management. International journal of production economics, 145(2), 773-789.

Hofmann, E., 2005. Supply Chain Finance: some conceptual insights. Logistik Manag. Innov. Logistikkonzepte. Wiesbad. Dtsch. Univ. 203–214.

Ivashina, V., Scharfstein, D., 2010. Bank lending during the financial crisis of 2008. J. financ. econ. 97, 319–338.

Lamoureux, J.-F., Evans, T.A., 2011. Supply Chain Finance: A New Means to Support the Competitiveness and Resilience of Global Value Chains. Social Science Research Network, Rochester, NY.

Lekkakos, S.D., Serrano, A., 2016. Supply chain finance for small and medium sized enterprises: the case of reverse factoring. Int. J. Phys. Distrib. Logist. Manag.

Pfohl, H.C., Gomm, M., 2009. Supply chain finance: optimizing financial flows in supply chains. Logist. Res. 1, 149–161.

Randall, W., Farris II, T., 2009. Supply chain financing: using cash-to-cash variables to strengthen the supply chain. Int. J. Phys. Distrib. Logist. Manag. 39, 669–689.

 

 

Please see my Related Posts.

The Collapse of Global Trade during Global Financial Crisis of 2008-2009

The Dollar Shortage, Again! in International Wholesale Money Markets

Economics of Trade Finance

Hierarchical Planning: Integration of Strategy, Planning, Scheduling, and Execution

Production and Distribution Planning : Strategic, Global, and Integrated

Integrated Macroeconomic Accounts, NIPAs, and Financial Accounts

Key Sources of Research:

 

SUPPLY CHAIN FINANCE FUNDAMENTALS: What It Is, What It’s Not and How it Works

Click to access supplychainFundamentals.pdf

Call for papers: Supply Chain Finance

Call for papers for Special Topic Forum in Journal of Purchasing and Supply Management (Manuscript Submission:  March 31, 2017)

https://www.journals.elsevier.com/journal-of-purchasing-and-supply-management/call-for-papers/call-for-papers-supply-chain-finance

 

FINANCIAL SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT – CHALLENGES AND OBSTACLES

Peter Kristofik, Jenny Kok, Sybren de Vries, Jenny van Sten-van’t Hoff

2012

Click to access 201202h.pdf

 

 

Supply chain finance: optimizing financial flows in supply chains

Hans-Christian Pfohl • Moritz Gomm

2009

Click to access 5576960408ae75363751afb1.pdf

 

 

Supply Chain Finance: some conceptual insights.

Hofmann, E. (2005)

In: Lasch, R./ Janker, C.G. (Hrsg.): Logistik Management – Innovative Logistikkonzepte, Wiesbaden
2005, S. 203-214.

Click to access Supply%20Chain%20Finance.pdf

 

 

Financial Supply Chain Management – A review

Georgios Vousinas

2017

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/320196808_Financial_Supply_Chain_Management_-_A_review

 

 

Basic areas of management of finance flow in supply chains

Marlena Grabowska1

Częstochowa University of Technology

https://www.czasopismologistyka.pl/artykuly-naukowe/send/301-artykuly-drukowane/4621-artykul

 

THE FLOW OF FINANCIAL RESOURCES:AN INEVITABLE PART OF SUPPLY CHAIN
DESIGN ACTIVITIES

ERIK HOFMANN

Click to access Hofmann_The%20flow%20of%20financial%20resources%20-%20An%20inevitable%20part%20of%20supply%20chain%20design%20activities.pdf

 

Motorola’s global financial supply chain strategy

Ian D. Blackman

Christopher P. Holland

Timothy Westcott

Click to access Motorolas-global-financial-supply-chain-strategy.pdf

A SUPPLY CHAIN-ORIENTED APPROACH OF WORKING CAPITAL MANAGEMENT

 

Erik Hofmann

Herbert Kotzab

2010

 

Click to access Hofmann_et_al-2010-Journal_of_Business_Logistics.pdf

Financial Supply Chain Management – Neue Herausforderungen für die Finanz- und Logistikwelt.

Pfohl, H.-Chr./ Hofmann, E./ Elbert, R. (2003):

In: Logistik Management 5 (2003) 4, S. 10-26

Click to access Financial%20Supply%20Chain%20Management.pdf

 

Financing GPNs through inter-firm collaboration?
Insights from the automotive industry in Germany and Brazil

Christian Baumeister
Hans-Martin Zademach

Click to access MDW_21__2013__Financing_GPNs.pdf

 

 

Die Financial Chain im Supply Chain Management: Konzeptionelle Einordnung und Identifikation von Werttreibern.

Franke, J./ Pfaff, D./ Elbert, R./ Gomm, M./ Hofmann, E. (2005):

In: Ferstel, O. K./ Sinz, E. J./ Eckert, S./ Isselhorst, T. (Hrsg.): Wirtschaftsinformatik 2005. eEcono‐my, eGovernment, eSociety. Heidelberg 2005, S. 567‐584

Click to access 8858fcdb171db931b3c033bb1cdf55ea7683.pdf

 

 

Financial-Chain-Management
Ein generisches Modell zur Identifikation von Verbesserungspotenzialen

Donovan Pfaff
Bernd Skiera
TimWeitzel

Click to access wi2004_2_107-117.pdf

 

 

The Effects of Cross-Functional Integration on Profitability, Process
Efficiency, and Asset Productivity

Morgan Swink and Tobias Schoenherr

Click to access 2016%20-%20Research%20-%20JBL%20-%20The%20Effects%20of%20Cross-Functional%20Integration%20on%20Profitability,%20Process%20Efficiency.pdf

 

 

Quantifying and setting off network performance

Erik Hofmann

2006

Click to access Quantifying%20Network%20Performance_final%20version.pdf

 

 

Developing and discussing a supply chain-oriented model of collaborative working capital management

by
Erik Hofmann, University of St.Gallen, Switzerland
& Herbert Kotzab, Copenhagen Business School, Denmark

2006

 

Click to access Developing_and_discussing_a_supply_chain20151106-23047-gve831.pdf

 

 

The link between Purchasing and Supply Management maturity
models and the financial performance of international firms

Fábio Pollice
Afonso Fleury

 

Click to access The%20link%20between%20purchasing%20and%20supply%20management%20maturity%20models%20and%20the%20financial%20performance%20of%20international%20firms.pdf

 

 

SUPPLY CHAIN FINANCE
A Buyer-Centric Supplier Payables Financing Initiative

Martin Jemdahl
Lund, 2015

http://lup.lub.lu.se/luur/download?func=downloadFile&recordOId=8870575&fileOId=8870576

 

 

Supply Chain Finance: Optimal Introduction and Adoption Decisions

David A. Wuttke, Constantin Blome, H. Sebastian Heese and Margarita
Protopappa-Sieke

Click to access __smbhome.uscs.susx.ac.uk_qlfd7_Desktop_Supply%20Chain%20Finance%20Blome.pdf

 

 

The Value of Supply Chain Finance

Xiangfeng Chen and Chenxi Hu

Click to access 17676.pdf

 

Supply Chain Finance “Is SCF ready to be applied in SMEs?”

Jan H Jansen

Click to access 578cb87508ae5c86c9a6355b.pdf

 

 

Win-win and no-win situations in supply chain finance: The case of accounts receivable programs

Erik Hoffman

Click to access Triple-win-situations%20in%20supply%20chain%20finance_final.pdf

 

Introducing a financial perspective in Supply Chain Management: a literature review on Supply Chain Finance

Luca M. Gelsomino, Riccardo Mangiaracina,
Alessandro Perego, Angela Tumino

Click to access gelsomino_et_al.pdf

 

 

Towards A Theory Of Supply Chain And Finance Using Evidence From A Scottish Focus Group

R. de Boer, R. Dekkers, L. M. Gelsomino, C. de Goeij, M. Steeman Q. Zhou,
S. Sinclair, V. Souter

2017

Click to access Towards-A-Theory-Of-Supply-Chain-And-Finance-Using-Evidence-From-A-Scottish-Focus-Group.pdf

 

 

WORKING CAPITAL MANAGEMENT IN SUPPLY CHAINS

Nataliia G. Silaeva

2016

Click to access Master_thesis_Silaeva_Nataliya.pdf

 

 

Blockchain-driven supply chain finance: Towards a conceptual framework from a buyer perspective

Yaghoob Omrana, Michael Henkeb, Roger Heinesc, Erik Hofmann

Click to access WP29-Blockchain-driven%20supply%20chain%20finance%20Towards%20a%20conceptual%20framework%20from%20a%20buyer%20perspective.pdf

 

 

Selecting financial service providers for supply chains: How cross-functional collaboration can improve effectiveness and efficiency

Judith Martin

Prof. Dr. Erik Hofmann

Click to access Paper%20Full%20Version_Selecting%20financial%20service%20providers%20for%20supply%20chains.pdf

 

 

Supply chain finance as a value added service offered by a lead logistics provider

Careaga Franco, V.G.
Award date:
2016

Click to access 840401-1.pdf

 

 

B2B PAYMENTS, SUPPLY CHAIN FINANCE & E-INVOICING MARKET

Mirela Amariei
Tiberiu Avram
Ionela Barbuta
Simona Cristea
Sebastian Lupu
Mihaela Mihaila
Andreea Nita
Adriana Screpnic

2015

Click to access B2B_Payments_Supply_Chain_Finance__E-invoicing_Market_Guide_2015.pdf

 

 

Linking corporate strategy and supply chain management

Erik Hofmann

Click to access 1860230.pdf

 

 

Concepts and Trade-Offs in Supply Chain Finance

Kasper van der Vliet

Click to access 792140.pdf

 

 

Supply Chain Finance as a Value Added Service offered by a Lead Logistics Provider

by
Victor Gerardo Careaga Franco

Click to access Careaga_Franco_2016.pdf

 

Value Chain Finance: How Banks can Leverage Growth Opportunities for SME Banking Customers

Qamar Saleem, Global SME Banking and Value Chain Specialist, IFC

Dr. Eugenio Cavenaghi, Managing Director -Trade, Export & Supply Chain Finance, Banco Santander

Click to access Value%20Chain%20Finance_Qamar%20Saleem.pdf

 

 

 

Supply-chain finance: The emergence of a new competitive landscape

McKinsey

https://www.mckinsey.com/~/media/McKinsey/Industries/Financial%20Services/Our%20Insights/Supply%20chain%20finance%20The%20emergence%20of%20a%20new%20competitive%20landscape/MoP22_Supply_chain_finance_Emergence_of_a_new_competitive_landscape_2015.ashx

 

 

Fintechs and the Financial Side of Global Value Chains— The Changing Trade-Financing Environment

IMF

2017

Click to access 17-21.pdf

 

 

Global Supply Chain Management: Front and Center for Treasurers
Delivering Innovative Solutions that Integrate Financial and Physical Supply Chains

JP Morgan

https://www.jpmorgan.com/pdfdoc/jpmorgan/cash/pdf/global_supply_chain_front_and_center_for_treasurers

 

 

 

Supply Chain Finance

Aberdeen Group

2011

Click to access SCF%20Gaining%20Control%200258-6833-RA-SCFinance-SP-10-NSP.pdf

 

 

 

Supply chain financing: Using cash-to-cash variables to strengthen the supply chain

Wesley S. Randall

M. Theodore Farris II

2009

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/235317652_Supply_chain_financing_Using_cash-to-cash_variables_to_strengthen_the_supply_chain

 

 

 

Supply Chain Finance: ANew Means to Support the Competitiveness and Resilience of Global Value Chains

Jean-François Lamoureux and Todd Evans

Click to access 12_Lamoureux_and_Evans_e_FINAL.pdf

 

 

 

Maximising the value of supply chain finance

van der Vliet, K.; Reindorp, M.J.; Fransoo, J.C.

2013

Click to access 387399093290135.pdf

 

 

 

The Interface of Operations and Finance in Global Supply Chains

by
Lima Zhao

2014

Click to access Zhao_Lima_WHU_Diss_2014.pdf

 

 

 

Supply Chain Finance A conceptual framework to advance research

Kasper van der Vliet, Matthew J. Reindorp, Jan C. Fransoo
Beta Working Paper series 418

Click to access 23232338094103.pdf

 

 

COORDINATING WORKING CAPITAL MANAGEMENT MODEL IN COLLABORATIVE
SUPPLY CHAINS

A. Ivakina, N. Zenkevich

# 9 (E) – 2017

Click to access WP_9%28E%29-2017_Ivakina_Zenkevich.pdf

 

 

A conceptual model for supply chain finance for SMEs at operational level ‘An essay on the Supply Chain Finance paradigm ….

Jan H Jansen

2017

Click to access A-conceptual-model-for-supply-chain-finance-for-SMEs-at-operational-level-An-essay-on-the-Supply-Chain-Finance-paradigm-Vestnik-Chelyabinsk-State-University-Version-2-18-April-2017.pdf

 

 

Cash Flow Management and Manufacturing Firm Financial Performance: A Longitudinal Perspective

James R. Kroes

Andrew S. Manikas

http://scholarworks.boisestate.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1040&context=itscm_facpubs

 

 

 

TOWARDS INTER-ORGANIZATIONAL WORKING CAPITAL MANAGEMENT

Sari Monto

2013

https://www.doria.fi/bitstream/handle/10024/90028/isbn9789522653840.pdf?sequence=2

 

 

 

THE CYCLE TIMES OF WORKING CAPITAL: FINANCIAL VALUE CHAIN ANALYSIS METHOD

Miia Pirttilä

2014

https://www.doria.fi/bitstream/handle/10024/102180/Pirttilä_A4.pdf?sequence=2

 

 

Impact of Cash Conversion Cycle on Working Capital through Profitability: Evidence from Cement Industry of Pakistan

Afaq Ahmed Khan1, Mohsin Ayaz2, Raja Muhammad Waseem3, Sardar Osama

Bin Haseeb Abbasi4, Moazzam Ijaz

2016

Click to access Q1803021124131.pdf

 

 

Cash Conversion Cycle and Firms’ Profitability – A Study of Listed Manufacturing Companies of Pakistan

1Raheem Anser, 2Qaisar Ali Malik

2013

Click to access 2a7cb44463d9b8d3b77e2b36e23466cde4ec.pdf

 

 

The Power of Supply Chain Finance

How companies can apply collaborative finance models in their supply chain to
mitigate risks and reduce costs

M. Steeman

Click to access thepowerofsupplychainfinance.pdf

 

 

Supply Chain Finance Payable and Receivable Solutions Guide

2012

JP Morgan

A Conceptual Model of Supply Chain Finance for SMEs at Operational Level

 Jan H Jansen

21 November 2017

 

Click to access A-conceptual-model-for-supply-chain-finance-for-SMEs-at-operational-level-An-essay-on-the-Supply-Chain-Finance-paradigm-Vestnik-Chelyabinsk-State-University-Version-2-18-April-2017.pdf

 

 

Cash-to-cash: The new supply chain management metric

M Theodore Farris II; Paul D Hutchison

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management; 2002

Click to access 02e7e5312767de88df000000.pdf

 

 

 

Integrating financial and physical supply chains: the role of banks in enabling supply chain integration

Rhian Silvestro

Paola Lustrato

2012

 

Click to access 552f9c840cf21cb2faf005c0.pdf

 

 

 

Integration of Finance and Supply Chain: Emerging Frontier in Growing Economies

(A Case Study of Exporting Companies)

Muhammad Ahmar Saeed

Xiaonan Lv

 

Click to access FULLTEXT01.pdf

 

Research at the Interface of Finance, Operations, and Risk Management (iFORM): Recent Contributions and Future Directions

Volodymyr Babich

Panos Kouvelis

2017

https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3054711

 

 

 

PROCEEDINGS

Interface of Finance, Operations, and Risk Management (iFORM) SIG

2011

Click to access 947ccbd42b1fe0e90f298ab96cfcef8f0448.pdf

 

 

 

Cash to Cash Cycle with a Supply Chain Perspective

Can Duman
Sawanee Sawathanon

2009

 

Click to access FULLTEXT01.pdf

 

DYNAMIC AND STATIC LIQUIDITY MEASURES IN WORKING CAPITAL STRATEGIES

Monika Bolek, PhD

 

http://eujournal.org/index.php/esj/article/viewFile/764/798

 

 

 

Does working capital management affect cost of capital?
A first empirical attempt to build up a theory for supply chain finance

Erik Hofmann, Judith Martin

2016

 

Click to access Final%20paper_working%20capital%20management.pdf

 

 

 

Principle of Accounting System Dynamics – Modeling Corporate Financial Statements –

Kaoru Yamaguchi

 

http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.615.6514&rep=rep1&type=pdf

 

 

 

Money and Macroeconomic Dynamics

Accounting System Dynamics Approach

Edition 3.2

 

Kaoru Yamaguchi Ph.D.

Japan Futures Research Center

 

Click to access Macro%20Dynamics.pdf

 

 

 

Working Capital Management Model in value chains

Timo Eskelinen

2014

 

http://www.doria.fi/bitstream/handle/10024/96733/Working%20Capital%20Management%20Model%20in%20value%20chains_Timo%20Eskelinen.pdf?sequence=2&isAllowed=y

 

 

 

STANDARD DEFINITIONS FOR TECHNIQUES OF SUPPLY CHAIN FINANCE

Global Supply Chain Finance Forum

2016

 

Click to access ICC-Standard-Definitions-for-Techniques-of-Supply-Chain-Finance-Global-SCF-Forum-2016.pdf

Click to access download-the-scf-definitions.pdf

 

 

IMPROVING FIRM PERFORMANCE THROUGH VALUE-DRIVEN SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT: A CASH CONVERSION CYCLE APPROACH

Pan Theo Große-Ruyken
Stephan M. Wagner
Wen-Fong Lee

Baltic Management Review

Volume 3 No 1

2008

 

 

 

Best Practices in Cash Flow Management and Reporting

Hans-Dieter Scheuermann

http://www.financepractitioner.com/cash-flow-management-best-practice/best-practices-in-cash-flow-management-and-reporting?full

Financial Supply Chain Management

 

Regional Trading Blocs and Economic Integration

Regional Trading Blocs and Economic Integration

 

 

From Asia’s Rise in the New World Trade Order

Asia Rising

RTA5

 

 

From What is Regional Trade Blocs or Free Trade Agreements?

As trade integration across countries is intensifying, we hear more and more about Free Trade Agreements (FTAs) and Regional Trade Blocs (RTBs). As their name suggests these RTBs/FTAs are arrangements aimed for faster trade liberalisation at regional levels.

Countries are convinced that trade is an engine of growth and they are searching for arrangements that promote trade.

The WTO that contains 162 countries is the most popular one; a truly multilateral forum for trade liberalisation. But the history of WTO led trade liberalisation shows that the organisation is facing difficulty in bringing further trade liberalisation because of conflicting interest among large number of countries.

This has led to interest in trade liberalisation within a limited number of countries that may be regionally close together. These regional trade promoting arrangements advocate more tariff cuts and removal of other restrictions within the group while maintaining restrictions against the rest of the world.

Though many regional trade agreements like the EU, NAFTA and ASEAN were established before or around the time of WTO’s formation, there is mushrooming of RTBs in recent years. Recently formed Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP) shows this increasing affinity towards RTBs. Many RTBs like the TPP would like to make advanced level trade liberalisation and hence they are not satisfied with the slow pace of trade liberalisation within the WTO.

What are Regional Trade Blocs (RTBs)?

Regional Trade Blocs or Regional Trade Agreements (or Free Trade Agreements) are a type of regional intergovernmental arrangement, where the participating countries agree to reduce or eliminate barriers to trade like tariffs and non-tariff barriers.  The RTBs are thus historically known for promoting trade within a region by reducing or eliminating tariff among the member countries.

Over the last few decades, international trade liberalisations are taking place in a serious manner through the formation of RTBs. They are getting wide attention because of many important international developments. First, now the world is trying hard to escape from the ongoing great recession phase. Second is the failure of the WTO to take further liberalisation measures on the trade liberalisation front.

The EU, NAFTA, ASEAN, SAFTA etc are all examples for regional integration. The triad of North America, Western Europe, and Asia Pacific have the most successful trade blocs. Recently signed Trans Pacific Partnership is a powerful RTB. Similarly, another one called RCEP is in negotiation round. India has signed an FTA with the ASEAN in 2009. Simultaneously, the country has signed many bilateral FTAs.

Different types of RTBs

All regional trade blocs don’t have the same degree of trade liberalisation. They may differ in terms of the extent of tariff cutting, coverage of goods and services, treatment of cross border investment among them, agreement on movement of labour etc.

The simple form of regional trade bloc is the Free Trade Area. The Free Trade Area is a type of trade bloc, a designated group of countries that have agreed to eliminate tariffs, quotas and preferences on most (if not all)goods and services traded between them.

From the lowest to the highest, regional trade integration may vary from just tariff reduction arrangement to adoption of a single currency. The most common type of regional trade bloc is the free trade agreement where the members abolish tariffs within the region. Following are the main types of regional economic integrations.

Classification of RTBs

Preferential trading union: Here, two or more countries form a trading club or a union and reduce tariffs on imports of each other ie, when they exchange tariff preferences and concessions.

Free trade union or association: Member countries abolish all tariffs within the union, but maintain their individual tariffs against the rest of the world.

Customs union: countries abolish all tariffs within and adopt a common external tariff against the rest of the world.

Common market: in addition to the customs union, unrestricted movement of all factors of production including labour between the member countries. In the case of European Common Market, once a visa is obtained one can get employed in France or Germany or in any other member country with limited restrictions.

Economic union: The Economic Union is the highest form of economic co-operation. In addition to the common market, there is common currency, common fiscal and monetary policies and exchange rate policies etc. European Union is the example for an Economic Union. Under the European Monetary Union, there is only one currency- the Euro.

At present, out of the total regional trade arrangements FTAs are the most common, accounting for nearly 90 per cent.

 

From Regionalism in a globalizing world: an Asia-Pacific perspective

RTA7

From Asia’s Rise in the New World Trade Order

RTA4

 

From The world’s free trade areas – and all you need to know about them

International trade is a driving force behind economic growth, and two so-called “mega-regional” trade deals are dominating public debate on the issue: the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) and the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP).

But there are around 420 regional trade agreements already in force around the world, according to the World Trade Organization. Although not all are free trade agreements (FTAs), they still shape global trade as we know it.

 Global exports and trade agreements

Image: The Economist

 

What exactly are free trade areas?

The OECD defines a free trade area as a group of “countries within which tariffs and non-tariff trade barriers between the members are generally abolished but with no common trade policy toward non-members”.

The free movement of goods and services, both in the sense of geography and price, is the foundation of these trading agreements. However, tariffs are not necessarily completely abolished for all products.

 

Which are the world’s major free trade areas?

 

The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA)

 

Free trade between the three member nations, Canada, the US and Mexico, has been in place since January 1994. Although tariffs weren’t fully abolished until 2008, by 2014 total trilateral merchandise trade exceeded US$1.12 trillion.

According to the US government, trade with Canada and Mexico supports more than 140,000 small and medium-size businesses and over 3 million jobs in the US. Gains in Canada are reportedly even higher, with 4.7 million new jobs added since 1993. The country is also the largest exporter of goods to the US.

 US Trade with NAFTA Partner 1993-2012

Image: Congressional Research Service

 

However, the Council on Foreign Relations suggests that the impact on Mexico is harder to assess. Per capita income has not risen as fast as expected; nor has it slowed Mexican emigration to the US. However, farm exports to the US have tripled since 1994, and the cost of goods in Mexico has declined. The cost of basic household goods has halved since NAFTA came into force, according to estimates by GEA, a Mexican economic consulting firm.

 

Association of Southeast Asian Nations Free Trade Area (AFTA)

 

The AFTA was signed in January 1992 in Singapore. The original members were Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore and Thailand. Four countries have subsequently joined: Vietnam, Laos, Myanmar and Cambodia.

The bloc has largely removed all export and import duties on items traded between the nations. It has also entered into agreements with a number of other nations, including China, eliminating tariffs on around 90% of imported goods.

 The ASEAN AFTA

Image: ASEAN Briefing

 

The AFTA nations had a combined GDP of US$2.3 trillion in 2012, and they’re home to 600 million people. The agreement has therefore helped to dramatically reduce the cost of trade for a huge number of businesses and people.

 

Southern Common Market (MERCOSUR)

 

Although MERCOSUR was envisaged as a Latin American single market, enabling the free movement of people, goods, capitals and services, this vision is yet to become reality. Internal disputes have slowed progress towards removing tariffs and the free movement of people and goods.

But MERCOSUR is still one of the world’s leading economic blocs, and has a major influence on South American trade and the global economy.

 

Common Market of Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA)

 

Formed in December 1994, the organization aims to develop natural and human resources to benefit the region’s population. Its primary focus, according to the United Nations, is to establish a large economic and unit to overcome barriers to trade.

With 19 member states, and an annual export bill in excess of $80 billion, the organization is a significant market place, both within Africa and globally.

 COMESA Member States

Image: United Nations

 

COMESA utlimately aims to remove all barriers to intra-regional trade, starting with preferential tariffs and working towards a tariff-free common market and economic union.

 

What about the European Union?

 

The EU is a single market, which is similar to a free trade area in that it has no tariffs, quotas or taxes on trade; but a single market allows the free movement of goods, services, capital and people.

The EU strives to remove non-tariff barriers to trade by applying the same rules and regulations to all of its member states. The region-wide regulations on everything from working hours to packaging are an attempt to create a level playing field. This is not necessarily the case in a free trade area.

 The European Union

Image: BBC

 

The creation of the single market was a slow process. In 1957, the Treaty of Rome established the European Economic Community (EEC) or Common Market. However, it was not until 1986 that the Single European Act was signed. This treaty formed the basis of the single market as we know it, as it aimed to establish the free-flow of trade across EU borders. By 1993 this process was largely complete, although work on a single market for services is still ongoing.

Today, the EU is the world’s largest economy, and the biggest exporter and importer. The EU itself has free trade agreements with other nations, including South Korea, Mexico and South Africa.

 The State of EU Trade

Image: European Union

 

What about the TPP and TTIP?

 

Once fully ratified, the Trans-Pacific Partnership is set to become the world’s largest trade agreement. The TPP already covers 40% of global GDP, and trade between member nations is already significant.

However, by removing tariffs and other barriers to trade, the agreement hopes to further develop economic ties and boost economic growth.

 The Trans-Pacific Trade Deal

Image: Reuters

 

The Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership is a deal currently being negotiated between the EU and the US. If reached, it would itself become the world’s largest trade agreement – covering 45% of global GDP.

Like the TPP, it aims to cut tariffs and regulatory barriers to trade. Among these is the removal of customs duties, according to the EU’s negotiation factsheet.

The Center for Economic Policy Research has estimated that the deal would be worth $134 billion a year for the EU and $107 billion for the US – although opponents have disputed these figures.

 Transatlantic Negotiations

Image: Brookings

As the World Economic Forum’s E15 Initiative has highlighted, effective global trade is central to economic growth and development. Trade agreements are an integral part of making this a reality.

From Regional Trade Agreements and the Multi-polar Global Order:
Implications for South Korea’s Economy

RTA2RTA3

From Regional Trade Agreements and the Multi-polar Global Order:
Implications for South Korea’s Economy

RTA

From Regional Trade Agreements: Promoting conflict or building peace?

RTA8

Key Terms:

  • Rising Powers
  • Global Economic Governance
  • Mega-Regionals
  • World Trade Organization (WTO)
  • Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP)
  • Transpacific Trade and Investment Partnership (TPP)
  • MFN (Most Favored Nation)
  • PTA (Preferred Trading Agreement)
  • FTA (Free Trade Agreement)
  • RTA (Regional Trade Agreement)
  • MTS (Multi Lateral Trade System)
  • BTA (Bilateral Trade Agreement)
  • Belt and Road Initiative
  • Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP)
  • ASEAN
  • AEC
  • APEC
  • BRICS
  • EU
  • SAARC
  • MERCOSUR
  • Free Trade Area of the Asia-Pacific (FTAAP)
  • NAFTA
  • ASEAN+3
  • ASEAN+6
  • Custom Unions
  • Common Markets
  • Economic Unions
  • GATT
  • WTO
  • SADC
  • COMESA
  • ECOWAS
  • ECCAS/CEEAC
  • SACU
  • AFTA
  • SAPTA/SAFTA

Key Sources of Research:

 

 

What is Regional Trade Blocs or Free Trade Agreements?

http://www.indianeconomy.net/splclassroom/107/what-is-regional-trade-blocs-or-free-trade-agreements/

 

 

 

The world’s free trade areas – and all you need to know about them

2016

WEF

https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2016/05/world-free-trade-areas-everything-you-need-to-know/

 

Regional trade agreements: Blessing or burden?

Caroline Freund, Emanuel Ornelas

02 June 2010

http://voxeu.org/article/regional-trade-agreements-blessing-or-burden

 

 

 

Regional Trade Agreements: Promoting conflict or building peace?

Oli Brown
Faisal Haq Shaheen
Shaheen Rafi Khan
Moeed Yusuf

October 2005

Click to access security_rta_conflict.pdf

 

 

 

Regional trade agreements

WTO

https://www.wto.org/english/tratop_e/region_e/region_e.htm

 

A COMPLETE GUIDE TO THE REGIONAL TRADE AGREEMENTS OF THE ASIA-PACIFIC

WRITTEN BY TIM MARTYN
MARCH 2001

Click to access martyn.pdf

 

 

 

Globalization and the Growth in Free Trade Agreements

SHUJIRO URATA

2002

Click to access Globalization_and_FTA.pdf

 

 

 

Regional trade agreements: blessing or burden?

 

Click to access cp313.pdf

 

 

 

Mexico’s Free Trade Agreements

M. Angeles Villarreal
Specialist in International Trade and Finance

April 25, 2017

Click to access R40784.pdf

 

 

Regional Trade Agreements in a Multilateral Trade Regime: An Overview

Parthapratim Pal

Click to access survey_paper_RTA.pdf

 

 

 

REGIONAL TRADE INTEGRATIONS: A Comparative Study of African RTAs

Sannassee R., Boopendra S and Tandrayen Verena

Click to access 15.pdf

 

 

 

Trade Blocks and the Gravity Model: A Study of Economic Integration among Asian
Developing Countries

E. M. Ekanayake

Amit Mukherjee

Bala Veeramacheneni

Click to access 9180KU76078V3656.pdf

 

 

Free Trade Agreements, the World Trade Organization and Open Trade

Michael SUTTON

Click to access 04sutton.pdf

 

 

 

REGIONAL TRADE BLOCS THE WAY TO THE FUTURE?

ALEJANDRO FOXLEY

Click to access regional_trade_blocs.pdf

 

 

 

Regional Trade Agreements and the WTO

Ildikó Virág-Neumann

2009

Click to access 32_Neumann-Virag.pdf

 

 

 

PREFERENTIAL TRADE AGREEMENTS AND THE WTO: IMPETUS OR IMPEDIMENT?

Committee on International Trade

Principal Drafters:
Helena Sullivan, Chair
Stuart Shroff
Mark Du
Albert Bloomsbury

THE ASSOCIATION OF THE BAR OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK
42 WEST 44TH STREET, NEW YORK, NY 10036

Click to access 20071935-PreferentialTradeAgreementsandtheWTO.pdf

 

 

 

Regional Trade Agreements and the Multi-polar Global Order:
Implications for South Korea’s Economy

Dr. Mi Park

Click to access 84.full.pdf

 

 

 

Rising Powers in the Global Trading System – China and Mega-Regional Trade Negotiations

Clara Brandi

2016

Click to access vol1.1.Clara-Brandi.pdf

 

Asia’s Rise in the New World Trade Order

The Effects of Mega-Regional Trade Agreements on Asian Countries

Part 2 of the GED Study Series:

Effects of Mega-Regional Trade Agreements

Click to access NW_Asia_s_Rise_in_the_New_World_Trade_Order.pdf

 

 

 

 

Regional Trade Agreements: Development Challenges and Policy Options

By Antoni Estevadeordal, Kati Suominen, Christian Volpe Martinicus,
December 2013

 

http://e15initiative.org/publications/regional-trade-agreements-development-challenges-and-policy-options/

http://e15initiative.org/themes/regional-trade-agreements/

 

 

 

Regional Trade Agreements

https://ustr.gov/trade-agreements/wto-multilateral-affairs/wto-issues/regional-trade-agreements

 

 

 

What are mega-regional trade agreements?

WEF

https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2014/07/trade-what-are-megaregionals/

 

Regional trade agreements, integration and development

2017

 

Click to access ser_rp2017d1_en.pdf

 

Mega-Regional Trade Agreements and the Future of the WTO

Chad Brown
PIIE

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1758-5899.12391/epdf

https://piie.com/commentary/speeches-papers/mega-regional-trade-agreements-and-future-wto

 

 

CHINA’S NEW REGIONAL TRADE AGREEMENTS

Agata Antkiewicz

John Whalley

December 2004

 

Click to access w10992.pdf

 

 

CHINA’S REGIONAL AND BILATERAL TRADE AGREEMENTS

Chunding Li Jing

Wang John Whalley

January 2014

 

Click to access pt.pdf

 

 

Currency Unions and Regional Trade Agreements: EMU and EU Effects on Trade

Reuven Glick

Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco

October 2016

Click to access wp2016-27.pdf

 

Regionalism in a globalizing world: an Asia-Pacific perspective

Dilip Das

2001

http://wrap.warwick.ac.uk/2038/

 

Production Chain Length and Boundary Crossings in Global Value Chains

Production Chain Length and Boundary Crossings in Global Value Chains

 

From Structure and length of value chains

In a value chain, value is added in sequential production stages and is carried forward from one producer to the next in the form of intermediate inputs. Value chains driven by the fragmentation of production are not an entirely new economic phenomenon, but the increasing reliance on imported intermediate inputs makes value chains global.

According to a 2013 report by the OECD, WTO and UNCTAD for the G-20 Leaders Summit, “Value chains have become a dominant feature of the world economy” (OECD et al., 2013).

Obviously, this dominant feature of the world economy needs measuring and analyzing. Policy-relevant questions include, but are not limited to:

  • what is the contribution of global value chains to economy GDP and employment? how long and complex are value chains?
  • what is the involvement and position of individual industries in global value chains? do multiple border crossings in global value chains really matter?

These and related questions generated a considerable amount of investigations proposing new measures of exports and production to account for global value chains. Some of those were designed to re-calculate trade  flows in value added terms, whereas other provided an approximation of the average length of production process.

A relatively new stream of research focuses on a deep decomposition of value added or final demand ( rather than exports or imports ) into components with varied paths along global value chains and measurements of the length of the related production processes. Consider, for example, a petrochemical plant that generates some value added equal to its output less all intermediate inputs used. We would be interested to know which part of this value added, embodied in the petrochemicals, is used entirely within the domestic economy and which part is exported.

We would also inquire how much of the latter satisfies final demand in partner countries and how much is further used in production and, perhaps, in exports to third countries and so on. We would be interested, in particular, in counting the number of production stages the value added in these petrochemicals passes along the chain before reaching its final user.

 

From Structure and length of value chains

APL

 

 

From Structure and length of value chains

A natural question is whether this method can be applied to the real economy with myriads of products, industries and dozens of partner countries? It can surely be applied if the data on inter-industry transactions are organized in the form of input-output accounts, and the computations are performed in block matrix environment. In fact, the measurement of the number of production stages or the length of production chains has attracted the interest of many input-output economists. The idea of simultaneously counting and weighting the number of inter-industry transactions was formalized by Dietzenbacher et al. (2005). Their “average propagation length” (APL) is the average number of steps it takes an exogenous change in one industry to affect the value of production in another industry. It is the APL concept on which we build the count of the number of production stages from the petrochemical plant to its consumers in our simplified example above. The only difference is that Dietzenbacher et al. (2005), and many authors in the follow-up studies, neglect the completion stage. First applications of the APL concept to measure the length of cross-border production chains appear in Dietzenbacher and Romero (2007) and Inomata (2008), though Oosterhaven and Bouwmeester (2013) warn that the APL should only be used to compare pure interindustry linkages and not to compare different economies or different industries.

Fally (2011, 2012) proposes the recursive definitions of two indices that quantify the “average number of embodied production stages” and the “distance to final demand”.  Miller and Temurshoev (2015), by analogy with Antras et al. (2012), use the logic of the APL and derive the measures of “output upstreamness” and “input downstreamness” that indicate industry relative position with respect to the nal users of outputs and initial producers of inputs. They show that their measures are mathematically equivalent to those of Fally and the well known indicators of, respectively, total forward linkages and total backward linkages. Fally (2012) indicates that the average number of embodied production stages may be split to account for the stages taking place within the domestic economy and abroad. This approach was implemented in OECD (2012), De Backer and Miroudot (2013) and elaborated in Miroudot and Nordstrom (2015).

Ye et al. (2015) generalize previous length and distance indices and propose a consistent accounting system to measure the distance in production networks between producers and consumers at the country, industry and product levels from different economic perspectives. Their “value added propagation length” may be shown to be equal to Fally’s embodied production stages and Miller & Temurshoev’s input downstreamness when aggregated across producing industries.

Finally, Wang et al. (2016) develop a technique of additive decomposition of the average production length. Therefore, they are able to break the value chain into various components and measure the length of production along each component. Their production length index system includes indicators of the average number of domestic, cross-border and foreign production stages. They also propose new participation and production line position indices to clearly identify where a country or industry is in global value chains. Importantly, Wang et al. (2016) clearly distinguish between average production length and average propagation length, and between shallow and deep global value chains.

This paper builds on the technique and ideas of Wang et al. (2016) and the derivation of the weighted average number of border crossings by Muradov (2016). It re-invents a holistic system of analytical indicators of structure and length of value chains. As in Wang et al. (2016), global value chains are treated here within a wider economy context and are juxtaposed with domestic value chains. This enables developing new indices of orientation towards global value chains. The novel deliverables of this paper are believed to include the following. First, all measurements are developed with respect to output rather than value added or final product  flows. This is superior for interpretation and visualization purposes because a directly observable economic variable ( output ) is decomposed in both directions, forwards to the destination and backwards to the origin of value chain. It is also shown that at a disaggregate country-industry level, the measurement of production length is equivalent with respect to value added and output. Second, the decomposition of output builds on a factorization of the Leontief and Ghosh inverse matrices that allows for an explicit count of production stages within each detailed component. Third, the system builds on a refined classication of production stages, including final and primary production stages that are often neglected in similar studies. Fourth, the paper re-designs the average production line position index and proposes new indices of orientation towards global value chains that, hopefully, avoid overemphasizing the length of some unimportant cross-border value chains. Fifth, a new chart is proposed for the visualization of both structure and length of value chains. The chart provides an intuitive graphical interpretation of the GVC participation, orientation and position indices.

It is also worth noting that both Wang et al. (2016) and this paper propose similar methods to estimate the intensity of GVC-related production in partner countries and across borders. This is not possible with previous decomposition systems without explicitly counting the average number of production stages and border crossings.

 

 Key Terms:

  • Average Propagation Length
  • National Boundaries
  • Networks
  • Value Chains
  • Supply Chains
  • Upstreamness
  • Downstreamness
  • Structure of Chains
  • Smile Curves
  • Vertical Specialization
  • Fragmentation of Production
  • Shock Amplifiers
  • Shock Absorbers
  • Production Sharing
  • World Input Output Chains
  • WIOD
  • Counting Boundary Crossings
  • Production Staging
  • Slicing Up Value Chains
  • Mapping Value Chains
  • Geography of Value Chains
  • Spatial Economy

Key Sources of Research:

 

 

Characterizing Global Value Chains

Zhi Wang

Shang-Jin Wei

Xinding Yu and Kunfu Zhu

GLOBAL VALUE CHAIN DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2016
Background Paper Conference

Beijing, 17-18 March 2016

Click to access Characterizing_Global_Value_Chains.pdf

 

 

The Great Trade Collapse: Shock Amplifiers and Absorbers in Global Value Chains

Zhengqi Pan

2016

Click to access Zhengqi%20Pan_GPN2016_008.pdf

 

 

CHARACTERIZING GLOBAL VALUE CHAINS:PRODUCTION LENGTH AND UPSTREAMNESS

Zhi Wang
Shang-Jin Wei
Xinding Yu
Kunfu Zhu
March 2017

Click to access w23261.pdf

 

 

 

Characterizing Global Value Chains

Zhi Wang
Shang-Jin Wei,
Xinding Yu and Kunfu Zhu

September 2016

Click to access Wang,%20Zhi.pdf

Click to access 8178.pdf

 

 

MEASURING AND ANALYZING THE IMPACT OF GVCs ON ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

GLOBAL VALUE CHAIN DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2017

International Bank for Reconstruction and Development/The World Bank
2017

Click to access tcgp-17-01-china-gvcs-complete-for-web-0707.pdf

 

 

 

Global Value Chains

Click to access Lecture%20Global%20Value%20Chains.pdf

 

 

MAPPING GLOBAL VALUE CHAINS

4-5 December 2012
The OECD Conference Centre, Paris

Click to access MappingGlobalValueChains_web_usb.pdf

 

 

 

Structure and length of value chains

Kirill Muradov

Click to access IO-Workshop-2017_Muradov_abstract.pdf

Click to access IO-Workshop-2017_Muradov_ppt.pdf

https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3054155

 

Production Staging: Measurement and Facts

Thibault Fally

August 2012

http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.717.7092&rep=rep1&type=pdf

 

 

 

TRACING VALUE-ADDED AND DOUBLE COUNTING IN GROSS EXPORTS

Robert Koopman
Zhi Wang
Shang-Jin Wei

November 2012

Click to access w18579.pdf

 

 

 

GIVE CREDIT WHERE CREDIT IS DUE: TRACING VALUE ADDED IN GLOBAL PRODUCTION CHAINS

Robert Koopman
William Powers
Zhi Wang
Shang-Jin Wei

September 2010

Click to access NBER%20working%20paper_1.pdf

 

 

 

Measuring the Upstreamness of Production and Trade Flows

By Pol Antràs, Davin Chor, Thibault Fally, and Russell Hillberry

2012

Click to access acfh_published.pdf

Click to access w17819.pdf

 

 

 

Using Average Propagation Lengths to Identify Production Chains in the Andalusian Economy

 

https://idus.us.es/xmlui/bitstream/handle/11441/17372/file_1.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y

 

 

Production Chains in an Interregional Framework: Identification by Means of Average Propagation Lengths

 2007

 

http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0160017607305366

 

 

 

Vertical Integration and Input Flows

Enghin Atalay

Ali Hortaçsu

Chad Syverson

2013

Click to access verticalownership.pdf

 

 

 

The Rise of Vertical Specialization Trade

Benjamin Bridgman

January 2010

Click to access the_rise_of_vertical_specialization_trade_bridgman_benjamin.pdf

 

 

 

THE NATURE AND GROWTH OF VERTICAL SPECIALIZATION IN WORLD TRADE

David Hummels
Jun Ishii
Kei-Mu Yi*

March 1999

http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.475.3874&rep=rep1&type=pdf

 

 

Accounting for Intermediates: Production Sharing and Trade in Value Added

Robert C. Johnson

Guillermo Noguera

First Draft: July 2008
This Draft: June 2009

http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.211.9707&rep=rep1&type=pdf

First Draft: July 2008
This Draft: May 2011

Click to access PAPER_4_Johnson_Noguera.pdf

 

 

 

FRAGMENTATION AND TRADE IN VALUE ADDED OVER FOUR DECADES

Robert C. Johnson
Guillermo Noguera

June 2012

http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.679.6227&rep=rep1&type=pdf

 

 

 

Can Vertical Specialization Explain The Growth of World Trade

Kei-Mu Yi

1999

Click to access sr96.pdf

 

 

CAN MULTI-STAGE PRODUCTION EXPLAIN THE HOME BIAS IN TRADE?

Kei-Mu Yi

Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia
June 2008
This revision: November 2008

https://www.philadelphiafed.org/-/media/research-and-data/publications/working-papers/2008/wp08-12r.pdf?la=en

 

 

 

Global Value Chains: New Evidence for North Africa

D. Del Prete, G. Giovannetti, E. Marvasi

2016

Click to access wp07_2016.pdf

 

 

 

Slicing Up Global Value Chains

Marcel Timmera Abdul Erumbana Bart Losa
Robert Stehrerb Gaaitzen de Vriesa

Presentation at International Conference on Global Value Chains and
Structural Adjustments,

Tsinghua University, June 25, 2013

Click to access session4_timmer.pdf

 

 

 

On the Geography of Global Value Chains

Pol Antràs

Alonso de Gortari

May 24, 2017

Click to access gvc_ag_latest_draft.pdf

 

 

Counting Borders in Global Value Chains

Posted: 12 Jul 2016

Last revised: 29 Aug 2016

Kirill Muradov

 

https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2808130

 

 

Determinants of country positioning in global value chains

Kirill Muradov

May 2017

Click to access 2932_20170627121_Muradov2017_countrypositioninGVC_1.1.pdf

 

 

THE CONSTRUCTION OF WORLD INPUT–OUTPUT TABLES IN THE WIOD PROJECT

ERIK DIETZENBACHERa*, BART LOSa, ROBERT STEHRERb, MARCEL TIMMERa and GAAITZEN DE VRIES

2013

 

Click to access WIOD%20construction.pdf

 

 

 

 

On the fragmentation of production in the us

Thibault Fally

July 2011

Click to access Fally.pdf

http://voxeu.org/article/has-production-become-more-fragmented-international-vs-domestic-perspectives

A New Measurement for International Fragmentation of the Production Process: An International Input-Output Approach

Inomata, Satoshi

http://www.ide.go.jp/English/Publish/Download/Dp/175.html

Output Upstreamness and Input Downstreamness of Industries/Countries in World Production

Ronald E. Miller

Umed Temurshoev

 

Date Written: July 9, 2015

https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2700845

Input-Output Calculus of International Trade

Kirill Muradov

 

Date Written: June 1, 2015

Posted: 9 Sep 2015 Last revised: 5 Oct 2015

https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2643098

 

 

 

 Made in the World?

S. Miroudot

Hakan Nordstrom

Date Written: September 2015

https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2658562

 

 

 

The Average Propagation Length Conflicting Macro, Intra-industry, and Interindustry Conclusions

October 2013
Jan Oosterhaven

Maaike C. Bouwmeester

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/258142955_The_Average_Propagation_Length_Conflicting_Macro_Intra-industry_and_Interindustry_Conclusions

 

 

 

Accounting Relations in Bilateral Value Added Trade

Robert Stehrer

May 2013

Click to access accounting-relations-in-bilateral-value-added-trade-dlp-3021.pdf

Whither Panama? Constructing a Consistent and Balanced World SUT System including International Trade and Transport Margins

Robert Stehrer

Click to access whither-panama-constructing-a-consistent-and-balanced-world-sut-system-including-international-trade-and-transport-margins-dlp-2905.pdf


https://wiiw.ac.at/p-2905.html

Quantifying International Production Sharing at the Bilateral and Sector Levels

Zhi Wang, Shang-Jin Wei, Kunfu Zhu

NBER Working Paper No. 19677
Issued in November 2013, Revised in March 2014

http://www.nber.org/papers/w19677

Measuring Smile Curves in Global Value Chains

Ming YE, Bo MENG , and Shang-jin WEI

August 2015

http://www.ide.go.jp/English/Publish/Download/Dp/530.html

 

 

 

 FOLLOW THE VALUE ADDED: BILATERAL GROSS EXPORT ACCOUNTING

by Alessandro Borin and Michele Mancini

2015

 

Click to access en_tema_1026.pdf