USA and China: What are Trade in Value Added (TiVA) Balances

USA and China: What are Trade in Value Added (TiVA) Balances

 

Changes in Global Trade

  • Global Value Chains
  • Production Fragmentation
  • Vertical Specialization
  • Value added content of Trade

 

FROM INTERCONNECTED ECONOMIES : BENEFITING FROM INDUSTRY GLOBALISATION

TIVA4TIVA5

 

From Domestic Value Added in Chinese Exports

 

TIVA12

 

From Measurement and Determinants of Trade in Value Added

 

TIVA11

 

From OECD WTO TIVA

TIVA13

 

Ongoing TiVA Projects

  • OECD TIVA Initiative
  • EU FIGARO Initiative
  • NA TIVA Initiative
  • APEC TiVA Initiative

 

There is also OECD TiVA – MNE Project which incorporates Intra Firm trade of MNEs.

 

From An Overview on the Construction of North American Regional Supply-Use and Input-Output Tables and their Applications in Policy Analysis

Introduction

Trade-in-Value Added (TiVA) is a statistical approach used to measure the interconnectivity and marginal contribution in production of participating economies in global value chains (GVCs) (Degain and Maurer, 2015). The advantage of TiVA over traditional trade statistics is that TiVA measures trade flows consistent with internationally, vertically integrated global production networks, often called GVCs. TiVA statistics allow us to better analyze three aspects of international trade: measuring the contribution of domestic versus foreign intermediates in the exports, tracing production across countries to their final destination, and finally quantifying how individual industries contribute to producing exports (Lewis, 2013).

TiVA statistics allow us to map and quantify the interdependencies between industries and economies, and help us develop better estimates of the contribution from each country in the production processes and, consequently, better measure the impact from GVC engagement for domestic economies. However, it is necessary to highlight the underlying compilation methodology of TiVA in order to better understand the characteristics, scope and interpretation of TiVA. Hence, it is important to remember that TiVA statistics are estimated statistics that are derived, in part, from official statistics. TiVA statistics are meant to complement but not to replace official statistics.

Measuring trade flows in value added as opposed to gross value of trade flows has become increasingly important as the influence that GVCs has on international trade continues to rise. (Johnson, 2014; Ahmad and Ribarsky, 2014). The proliferation of GVCs means that production has become increasingly fragmented and vertically integrated across countries (Jones and Kierzkowski, 1988; Hummels, Ishii, and Yi, 2001; OECD, 2013). At the micro level, this means that many firms in disparate countries are interconnected. Across international borders, these firms take part in particular stages of the production process, together forming a global supply chain. As a result, intermediate inputs may cross international borders several times before being used to produce final consumable goods. This matters for several reasons. First, when goods cross multiple borders multiple times, they are exposed to more trade costs, which accumulate and compound before the goods are sold for final consumption. Additionally, traditional gross trade flows are overstated because gross trade flows may count intermediates multiple times. Relatedly, gross trade flows obscure the marginal contributions of countries along GVCs. TiVA measures the flows related to the value that is added at each stage of production by each country and maps from where value is created, where it is exported, and how it is used, as final consumption or as an input for future exports. How we understand gains from trade from trade flows is fundamental, and value-added approaches lead to better understanding of GVCs and their role in international trade.

There are two ways to capture TiVA. The first method is a direct approach, which decomposes existing data on trade statistics. Johnson (2012) introduce a TiVA indicator using value-added to output ratios from the source country to compute the value-added associated with the implicit output transfer to each destination. Koopman, Wang, and Wei (2014) build on the literature in vertical specialization (e.g. Hummels, Ishii, and Yi 2001) and the literature on TiVA (e.g. Johnson and Noguera, 2012; Daudin, Rifflart, and Schweisguth, 2011) to implement a complete decomposition of a country’s gross exports by value added components. This work has evolved into a second, indirect method of capturing TiVA. The indirect method is employed in the regional North American supply-use table (NASUT) and the regional North American inter-country input-output table (NAIOT). Estimating TiVA this way relies on national and international input-output tables as well as bilateral trade statistics to derive the international intermediate and final supply-demand matrices. These matrices reveal the origin and use of goods and services produced and exchanged among the countries and industries within the table domain. Other major international input-output tables include the Asian International Input-Output (AIO) Tables published by the Institute of Developing Economies Japan External Trade Organization (IDE-JETRO), the Inter-Country Input-Output (ICIO) Tables published by the OECD, the World Input-Output Tables (WIOT) published by the World Input-Output Database (WIOD) project, and the Eora Multi-region Input-Output Database (Eora MRIO).

The studies based on the above two approaches have revealed a trend of rising foreign value-added content in international trade flows and the resulting implications for trade policies. Johnson and Noguera (2016) find that value-added exports are falling relative to gross exports, which means that double-counting is increasingly more common in trade flows. This is consistent with increased GVC activity. Hummels, Ishii, and Yi (2001) show that vertical specialization has grown about 30 percent and accounts for about one-third of the growth in trade from about 1970 to 1990.

In recent years, more than half of global manufacturing imports are intermediate goods and more than 70 percent of global services imports are intermediate services (OECD, 2013). This is relevant because tariffs (and other trade costs) have a higher impact on the cost of GVC activity. Each time an intermediate input crosses an international border as part of the production process, the input incurs trade costs. As first observed by Yi (2003), trade costs are compounded when intermediate goods cross borders multiple times to complete the production process. Rouzet and Miroudot (2013) demonstrate that small tariffs can add up to a significant sum by the time a finished product reaches its consumers. Other trade costs such as non-tariff measures also have such accumulative effect on downstream products.

What the literature indicates the trends in GVCs mean for trade flows, generally, are two-fold. First, with the growth of GVC activity, gross value of trade flows will continue to be larger than the value of final goods that cross borders. Second, trade policy designed with respect to gross trade flows could have the potential to be overly restrictive or even impose costs indirectly on domestic production. Trade-in-Value Added thus provides a supplementary, relevant reference for evaluating the economic effect of trade policies.

In this paper, we introduce the North American Trade-in-Value Added (NA-TiVA) project, a trilateral, multiyear initiative that aims to produce a regional TiVA database that maps the value chains connecting Canada, the United States, and Mexico. Furthermore, we introduce and discuss the project’s deliverables, the agencies involved, how the NA-TiVA project complements other ongoing TiVA initiatives around the world, the technical framework for producing a regional inter-country input-output table for the NA region, and the value of this work to resolving open policy questions within international trade.

Ongoing TiVA Initiatives

Currently there are three major ongoing global and regional TiVA projects that are related to the North America TiVA project. They are the World Input-Output database (WIOD), OECD-WTO TiVA, and APEC TiVA initiatives.

The World Input-Output database (WIOD): The official WIOD project ran from May 1, 2009 to May 1, 2012, as a joint effort of eleven European research institutions. It was funded by the European Commission. Under the official WIOD project, the accounting framework and methodologies of constructing the TiVA databases, as well as the first version of the World Input-Output database were developed. The database was officially launched in April 2012. Since then, two additional versions of WIOD databases, namely the 2013 and 2016 Releases, were published. The 2016 Released database covers 28 EU countries and 15 other major economies in the world for years 2000-2014 with 56 industries.

The OECD-WTO TiVA database: The Organization for Economic Cooperate and Development (OECD) and World Trade Organization (WTO) undertook a joint initiative on TiVA in 2013. Since then, two versions of TiVA databases have been released (2013 and 2015 release). The 2015 release of OECD-WTO TiVA database covers 61 countries and 13 regions, with 34 industries, for years 1995, 2000, 2005, 2008-2011.

APEC TiVA initiative: In 2014, APEC economic leaders endorsed the APEC TiVA database initiative, a four-year project co-led by China and the United States. Under this project, an APEC TiVA database would be constructed by the end of 2018, covering 21 APEC economies.

Each of these three major global and regional TiVA initiatives include Canada, Mexico, and the United States. In the light of this, why is there still a need for constructing the NA TiVA database? What kind of additional value can the NA TiVA project bring to this global and regional network of TiVA initiatives?

The NA-TiVA project was motivated by regional statistical developments and continuous improvements in compiling TiVA databases. The 2003 Mexican input-output table distinguishes trade flows by domestic producers and production undertaken in Maquiladoras, a tax-free, tariff-free special processing zone, which allowed the estimates of separate production coefficients and thus TiVA measures for these two distinctive zones in Mexico (Koopman, Powers, Wang, and Wei, 2010; De la Cruz, Koopman, Wang, and Wei, 2011). The government of Canada further highlighted the importance and relevance of global value chains in the publication of a book assessing the impact and implication of GVCs (Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada, 2011); and as of the 2015 edition of the OECD’s ICIO tables, Mexico is broken out as Mexico Global Manufacturers and Mexico Non-Global Manufacturers. This NA TiVA project builds off of these developments.

Constructing inter-country input-output tables, or so called TiVA databases, requires the harmonization of national supply-use tables (SUTs) or input-output tables (IOTs) as well as bilateral trade statistics from different countries. However, the data produced by countries often vary greatly in the level of detail and differ in industry and product classifications. Thus, the more countries are included in a global or regional TiVA project, the higher level of aggregation would be required for the purpose of harmonization. With only three countries involved, it is feasible for the NA TiVA database to include more products and sectors than other global and regional TiVA projects.

Moreover, other factors, such as all three countries adopt the same industry and product classifications (e.g. using the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS)), and produce SUTS at similarly detailed levels, would ensure the compatibility of data components, and thus lead to better quality of the resulting NA TiVA database.

Finally, the NA TiVA project could synthesize the ongoing trilateral trade statistics reconciliation effort and produce better-quality balanced bilateral trade data to feed into other global and regional TiVA initiatives. One of the key inputs for constructing TiVA databases is balanced bilateral trade statistics. However, countries rarely report symmetric bilateral trade statisticsone country’s reported exports rarely equals its trading partner’s reported imports, and vice versa. To reconcile such asymmetries to produce balanced bilateral trade statistics, joint effort by both trading countries is warranted, including investigating the causes of asymmetries at detailed product level and making corresponding adjustment mechanically. However, global and regional TiVA initiatives often have to consider an incredible number of country pairs, making such an elaborate reconciliation practice rather infeasible. Thus, global and regional TiVA initiatives often turn to economic modelling to balance bilateral trade statistics which could be applied in a systematic way to all countries. Although such approach can be mathematically sound, the resulting data often require additional scrutiny, validation, and adjustment, as they do not always reflect the reality accurately. Canada, Mexico, and the United States have ongoing bilateral trade reconciliation. This NA TiVA project provides additional motivation and framework for this effort.

The History, Scope, and Major Objectives of the NA TiVA Initiative

In October 2014, the representatives from the United States, Canada, and Mexico met and kicked off the idea of constructing the NA TiVA database at a UN conference in Mexico. The main objective of this project is to construct the NA TiVA database by 2021 covering three NA countries with more detailed industry and firm information, and to improve the quality of TiVA measures for the value chains in the NA region.

The NA-TiVA project involves eight government agencies across the three NA countries: for Canada, Statistics Canada (STATCAN) and Global Affairs Canada; for Mexico, Instituto Nacional de Estadística y Geografía (INEGI) and Banco de Mexico; and for the United States, the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA), the U.S. Census Bureau (CENSUS), the U.S. International Trade Commission (USITC), and the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR).

In addition, because the resulting NA-TiVA database would be eventually integrated into the OECD-WTO TiVA database to improve the quality of information on the North American region, participants of the NA-TiVA project regularly meet with OECD representatives to harmonize TiVA database compilation methodologies, exchange data to synthesize the effort and ensure consistency across countries, and discuss best practices. Other international organizations, such as United Nations Statistics Division (UNSD), and WTO, are often consulted as well for national account and trade statistics related issues.

Under the NA-TiVA initiative, three parallel work streams have been established: The trade in goods and services reconciliation team, which is tasked to produce balanced bilateral trade statistics for goods and services; the SUT team, whose goal is to harmonize the national SUTs and compile the regional NASUTs and NAIOTs; and the White Paper team, the goal of which is to produce documentation that outlines the conceptual methodology, identifies major technical issues, describes policy applications of a NA-TiVA initiative, and details project outputs as well as future work.

FROM INTERCONNECTED ECONOMIES :BENEFITING FROM INDUSTRY GLOBALISATION

 

TIVA6

 

 

From Supply-Use Tables, Trade-in-Value-Added Initiatives, and their Applications

TIVATIVA2TIVA3

Please see my related posts:

Understanding Global Value Chains – G20/OECD/WB Initiative

The Collapse of Global Trade during Global Financial Crisis of 2008-2009

Development of Global Trade and Production Accounts: UN SEIGA Initiative

Trends in Intra Firm Trade of USA

Understanding Trade in Intermediate Goods

Intra Industry Trade and International Production and Distribution Networks

Production Chain Length and Boundary Crossings in Global Value Chains

 

Key Sources of Research:

The U.S.-China Bilateral Balance In Trade In Value Added

2017

https://seekingalpha.com/article/4048166-u-s-china-bilateral-balance-trade-value-added

 

 

 

 

Understanding the US-China Trade Relationship

Prepared for the US-China Business Council By Oxford Economics

January 2017

 

Click to access OE%20US%20Jobs%20and%20China%20Trade%20Report.pdf

 

 

 

Implications and Interpretations of Value-Added Trade Balances

John B. Benedetto

2012

 

Click to access implicationsand.pdf

 

 

The U.S.–China trade deficit—a value-added perspective

Demetrio Scopelliti

BLS

2013

Click to access u-s-china-trade-deficit.pdf

 

 

 

The value-added content of trade

Robert Johnson, Guillermo Noguera

07 June 2011

 

https://voxeu.org/article/value-added-content-trade-new-insights-us-china-imbalance

 

 

 

Trade in Value-Added

December 3, 2013

Logan Lewis

 

https://www.federalreserve.gov/econresdata/notes/ifdp-notes/2013/trade-in-value-added-20131203.html

 

 

 

 

China-U.S. Trade Issues

Wayne M. Morrison

Specialist in Asian Trade and Finance
April 2, 2018

FAS

Click to access RL33536.pdf

 

 

 

The China Shock revisited: Insights from value added trade flows

Adam Jakubiky Victor Kummritzz

June 30, 2017

Click to access jk_draft.pdf

 

 

 

 

Measurement and Determinants of Trade in Value Added

Nakgyoon Choi

2013

https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2317706

 

 

 

 

OECD-WTO: Statistics on Trade in Value Added

OECD

https://www.oecd-ilibrary.org/trade/data/oecd-wto-statistics-on-trade-in-value-added_data-00648-en

 

 

 

 

NAFTA, VALUE ADDED AND TRADE-IN-TASKS

Antonio Rodriguez-Lopez

Click to access nafta-essays-rodriguez-lopez.pdf

 

 

 

Trade in Value Added and the Value Added in Trade

Robert Stehrer

Click to access Stehrer_background_2.pdf

 

 

 

 

US Trade Wars with Emerging Countries in the 21st Century: Make America and Its Partners Lose Again

Antoine Bouët (International Food Policy Research Institute, Washington, D.C., and Groupe de Recherche en Économie Théorique et Appliquée [GREThA], University of Bordeaux, France)
David Laborde (International Food Policy Research Institute)

2017

Click to access article_us_tradewars_bouet_laborde_2017.pdf

 

 

 

Measuring Value Added in the People’s Republic of China’s Exports: A Direct Approach.

Xing, Y.

2014.

ADBI Working Paper 493. Tokyo: Asian Development Bank Institute

Click to access adbi-wp493.pdf

 

 

 

 

International Trade Costs, Global Supply Chains and Value-added Trade in
Australia

Gerard Kelly and Gianni La Cava
RDP 2014-07

 

Click to access rdp2014-07.pdf

 

 

 

Trade in Value Added Revisited: A Comment on R. Johnson and G. Noguera,
Accounting for Intermediates: Production Sharing and Trade in Value Added

 

Masaaki Kuboniwa
January, 2014

 

Click to access DP598.pdf

 

 

 

 

How iPhone Widens the US Trade Deficits with PRC

Yuqing Xing
And
Neal Detert

Nov 2010

Click to access 10-21.pdf

 

 

 

 

Trade in value added (TIVA)

2012

Click to access trade-in-value-added-2012.pdf

 

 

Global Value Chains (GVCs)

OECD

http://www.oecd.org/sti/ind/global-value-chains.htm

 

 

 

INTERCONNECTED ECONOMIES: BENEFITING FROM GLOBAL VALUE CHAINS

SYNTHESIS REPORT

OECD

Click to access interconnected-economies-GVCs-synthesis.pdf

 

 

 

TRACING THE VALUE ADDED IN GLOBAL VALUE CHAINS:
PRODUCT-LEVEL CASE STUDIES IN CHINA

UNCTAD

Click to access ditctncd2015d1_en.pdf

 

 

 

 

The Growth of Chinese Exports:
An Examination of the Detailed Trade Data

Brett Berger
Robert F. Martin

US Federal Reserve

Click to access ifdp1033.pdf

 

 

 

 

Comparing Trade Performance of China and India

Sarah Y TONG

Click to access Vol1No1_SarahTong.pdf

 

 

 

 

Trade in Value Added : China

OECD WTO

2015

Click to access CN_2015_China.pdf

 

 

 

Value-Added Trade and Its Implications for International Trade Policy

Kemal Derviş, Joshua P. Meltzer, and Karim Foda

https://www.brookings.edu/opinions/value-added-trade-and-its-implications-for-international-trade-policy/

 

 

 

 

Bilateral Trade Balances with China: A Matter of Accounting

Submitted by Dana Vorisek

co-authors: Tianli Zhao

On Thu, 02/05/2015

http://blogs.worldbank.org/prospects/bilateral-trade-balances-china-matter-accounting

 

 

 

Value-Added Exports and U.S. Local Labor Markets:
Does China Really Matter?

Leilei Sheny
Peri Silvaz

WTO

August 2017

Click to access silva_e.pdf

 

 

 

HOW MUCH OF CHINESE EXPORTS IS REALLY MADE IN CHINA? ASSESSING
DOMESTIC VALUE-ADDED WHEN PROCESSING TRADE IS PERVASIVE

 

Robert Koopman
Zhi Wang
Shang-Jin Wei

NBER

June 2008

Click to access w14109.pdf

 

 

 

 

GIVE CREDIT WHERE CREDIT IS DUE:
TRACING VALUE ADDED IN GLOBAL PRODUCTION CHAINS

Robert Koopman
William Powers
Zhi Wang
Shang-Jin Wei

September 2010

Click to access w16426.pdf

 

 

 

SPIDERS AND SNAKES:
OFFSHORING AND AGGLOMERATION IN THE GLOBAL ECONOMY

Richard Baldwin
Anthony Venables

December 2010

Click to access w16611.pdf

 

 

 

TRADING TASKS: A SIMPLE THEORY OF OFFSHORING

Gene M. Grossman
Esteban Rossi-Hansberg

December 2006

http://www.nber.org/papers/w12721

 

 

 

 

PRODUCTION CHAINS

David K. Levine

December 2010

Click to access w16571.pdf

 

 

 

AN ELEMENTARY THEORY OF GLOBAL SUPPLY CHAINS

Arnaud Costinot
Jonathan Vogel
Su Wang

April 2011

Click to access w16936.pdf

 

 

 

TRADE-IN-GOODS AND TRADE-IN-TASKS:
AN INTEGRATING FRAMEWORK

Richard Baldwin
Frédéric Robert-Nicoud

April 2010

Click to access w15882.pdf

 

 

Measurement of Trade in Value-Added: using Chinese Input-output Tables
Capturing Processing Trade

Yang Cuihong1, Chen Xikang1, Duan Yuwan1, Jiang Xuemei1, Pei Jiansuo3, Xu Jian2,
Yang Lianling1, Zhu Kunfu1

 

Click to access STS024-P3-S.pdf

 

 

 

Adjusted China-US Trade Balance

Lawrence J. Lau, Xikang Chen and Yanyan Xiong

March 2017

Click to access igef%20working%20paper%20no.%2054%20english%20version.pdf

 

 

 

Domestic Value Added in Chinese Exports

Hiau Looi Kee and Heiwai Tang

World Bank and Tufts University
December 2011

Click to access session2-tang-presentation.pdf

 

 

 

NETWORKS OF VALUE ADDED TRADE

2015
João Amador | Sónia Cabral

Bank of Portugal

Click to access wp201516.pdf

 

 

 

 

Processing Trade, Exchange Rates and China’s Bilateral Trade Balances

Yuqing Xing

Jan 2011

 

Click to access 10-30.pdf

 

 

 

Trade in Value Added
WTO TiVA Profiles

Regional Workshop on
International Merchandise Trade Statistics
11-13 September 2017
Suzhou, China

UNSD

Click to access Agenda%20item%2019%20(c)%20-%20WTO.pdf

 

 

 

 

FRAGMENTATION AND TRADE IN VALUE ADDED OVER FOUR DECADES

Robert C. Johnson
Guillermo Noguera

June 2012

Click to access w18186.pdf

 

 

 

 

TRACING VALUE-ADDED AND DOUBLE COUNTING IN GROSS EXPORTS

Robert Koopman
Zhi Wang
Shang-Jin Wei

November 2012

Click to access w18579.pdf

 

 

 

 

ORGANIZING THE GLOBAL VALUE CHAIN

Pol Antràs
Davin Chor

June 2012

 

Click to access w18163.pdf

 

 

 

 

OFFSHORING: GENERAL EQUILIBRIUM EFFECTS ON WAGES, PRODUCTION
AND TRADE

Richard Baldwin
Frederic Robert-Nicoud

March 2007

 

Click to access w12991.pdf

 

 

 

 

TRADING TASKS: A SIMPLE THEORY OF OFFSHORING

Gene M. Grossman
Esteban Rossi-Hansberg

December 2006

Click to access w12721.pdf

 

 

 

 

Trade in Value Added: Developing New Measures of Cross-Border Trade

World Bank

2013

Click to access 786210PUB0REPL00Box377348B00PUBLIC0.pdf

 

 

 

 

Trade in Value Added

Maria Borga Jiemin Guo

BEA Advisory Committee

May 10, 2013

 

Click to access 0613_borga_guo_trade_in_value.pdf

 

 

 

 

Trade in value added Concepts, applications and challenges

Training Workshop on Trade in Services Negotiations for AU-CFTA Negotiators
Nairobi, Kenya

WTO

Click to access ditc-ted-Nairobi-24082015-WTO-liberatore-2.pdf

 

 

 

Trade in Value-Added: I-O approach and the domestic content of exports

UNSD

 

https://unstats.un.org/unsd/trade/globalforum/trade-value-added.asp

 

 

 

 

TRADE IN VALUE-ADDED: WTO-OECD DATABASE

Courtesy of Sébastien Miroudot (OECD)

UNESCAP

Click to access cbtr9-sebastien.pdf

 

 

 

 

TRADE IN VALUE-ADDED: CONCEPTS, METHODOLOGIES AND CHALLENGES
(JOINT OECD-WTO NOTE)

OECD WTO

Click to access 49894138.pdf

 

 

 

 

Trade in Value Added and the Value Added in Trade

WIOD

Working Paper Number: 8
Author: Robert Stehrer

Click to access wiod8.pdf

 

 

 

Measuring Trade in Value-Added

Draft Chapter 9

Meeting of Group of Experts on National Accounts –
Interim meeting on Global Production
Geneva, 3-4 April 2013

Click to access Working_Paper_9.pdf

 

 

 

Trade in Value Added: The Challenge of International Trade Statistics
With an Empirical Study on Trade in Norway and the Netherlands 2000-2012

Ida Helene Berg

https://www.duo.uio.no/bitstream/handle/10852/40975/BergIdaHelene.pdf?sequence=9

 

 

 

Trade in Value-Added and Comparative Advantage

DrRadford Schantz

25thINFORUM Conference
Riga

August 28-September 2, 2017

Click to access usa_schantz_2017_slides.pdf

 

 

 

Trade in Value Added: An East Asian Perspective.

Inomata, S.

2013.

ADBI Working Paper 451. Tokyo: Asian Development Bank Institute.

Click to access adbi-wp451.pdf

 

 

 

 

Global Value Chains and Trade in Value-Added: New Insights, Better Policies

Ken Ash

March 2013

 

https://www.worldeconomics.com/papers/Global%20Value%20Chains%20and%20Trade%20in%20ValueAdded_f7fe83a3-ec02-4180-9b02-04d1d85bb59a.paper

 

 

 

OECD WORK ON GLOBAL VALUE CHAINS AND TRADE IN VALUE ADDED

Koen De Backer

2013

Click to access 130627_de_backer.pdf

 

 

 

 

The Value-added Structure of Gross Exports and Global Production Network

Robert Koopman and Zhi Wang
United States International Trade Commission

Shang-Jin Wei, Columbia University, CEPR and NBER

Click to access 5839.pdf

 

 

 

Singapore’s Trade in Value Added:
Importance and Implication of Information from the OCED-WTO TiVA Database

Mun–Heng TOH

 

Click to access 2582_20160412091_Singapore_TiVA.pdf

 

 

 

 

Value added and participation in Global Value Chains:
the case of Spain

Marta Solaz
Universitat de Valencia

Fourth World KLEMS Conference, 23-24 May 2016

Click to access worldklems2016_Solaz_slides.pdf

 

 

 

 

Trade in Value Added (TiVA): December 2016

OECD

https://stats.oecd.org/index.aspx?queryid=75537

 

 

 

 

An Overview on the Construction of North American Regional Supply-Use and Input-Output Tables and their Applications in Policy Analysis

Statistics Canada
Anthony Peluso
U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis
Gabriel Medeiros
Jeffrey Young
U.S. International Trade Commission
Ross J. Hallren
Lin Jones
Richard Nugent
Heather Wickramarachi

ECONOMICS WORKING PAPER SERIES
Working Paper 2017-12-A

Click to access ecwp-2017-12-a-12-12-17-as-pdf_0.pdf

 

 

 

 

C. The rise of global value chains

World Trade Report

2014

Click to access wtr14-2c_e.pdf

 

 

 

 

MEASURING VALUE IN GLOBAL VALUE CHAINS

Rashmi Banga

UNCTAD
May 2013

Click to access ecidc2013misc1_bp8.pdf

 

 

 

 

Highlights and Challenges of Measuring Global Production

Tom Howells
Federal Economic Statistics Advisory Committee
Suitland Federal Center

June 9, 2017

Click to access Howells-Presentation.pdf

 

 

 

 

Value added trade: A tale of two concepts

Robert Stehrer

The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies (wiiw)
Version: 2012-12-09

December 10-11, 2012 – CompNet workshop
ECB Frankfurt, Germany.

 

http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.361.9428&rep=rep1&type=pdf

 

 

 

Summary Report of the Fifth Meeting of
APEC Technical Group of Measurement on TiVA under GVCs

August 2017

Click to access 20170901142536597.pdf

 

 

 

 

Trade in value added: do we need new measures of competitiveness?

Kirsten Lommatzsch, Maria Silgoner and Paul Ramskogler

2016

https://www.ecb.europa.eu/pub/pdf/scpwps/ecbwp1936.en.pdf?54d5d8210e9e26ed5bf65d4279223622

 

 

 

 

Who Faces the Risk of Collateral Damage from U.S. Tariffs?

wells Fargo

March 2018

Click to access collateral-damage-20180326.pdf

 

 

 

 

Supply-Use Tables, Trade-in-Value-Added Initiatives, and their Applications

William Powers

ADB Supply and Use Tables Validation Workshop

Bangkok, Thailand
30 June, 2016

https://wpqr4.adb.org/dm/atom/library/_Psut_RMain/document/_Psut_RPageLibrary48257E1F0010578E_D0819CE5DCD76117148257FE2002C81CC_ATiVA_5f2016_5fPowers.pdf/media

 

 

 

 

CHAPTER 13. APPLICATIONS OF EXTENDED SUPPLY AND USE TABLES:
CONSTRUCTING GLOBAL SUPPLY AND USE AND INPUT-OUTPUT TABLES

UNSD

 

Click to access Chapter%2013%20-%20Applications%20for%20Global%20Tables.pdf

 

 

 

 

APEC: Trade in Value Added under Global Value Chains

Erich H. Strassner

2ndStatistics Conference “Measuring the Economy in a Globalized World”
Santiago, Chile
3-4 October 2017

http://www.bcentral.cl/documents/20143/926189/4.2.%28Strassner%29.pdf/d18bab8d-2331-3af2-fcc5-e877c1722880

 

 

 

CURRENT DEVELOPMENTS AND FUTURE EXPANSIONS OF
TRADE IN VALUE-ADDED PROJECT IN OECD

Norihiko YAMANO

2016

Click to access current_developments_trade_valueadded_yamano.pdf

 

 

 

 

Estimating Extended Supply-Use Tables in Basic Prices with Firm Heterogeneity for the United States:A Proof of Concept

Lin Z. Jones and ZhiWang (USITC)
James J. Fetzer, Thomas F. Howells III, Erich H. Strassner (BEA)

The Fourth World KLEMS Conference
Madrid, Spain
May 23-24, 2016

Click to access worldklems2016_Strassner_slides.pdf

 

 

 

 

 

Work Plan for the Technical Group for the Measurement of APEC TiVA Under GVCs
Purpose: Information

Submitted by: China, United States
First Committee on Trade and Investment Meeting
Clark, Philippines
3-4 February 2015

Click to access CONTENT50694276526.pdf

 

 

 

 

APEC in 2014

Click to access NewDirections-05apec.pdf

 

 

 

Global value chains and trade in value added

EUROSTAT

http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/statistics-explained/index.php/Global_value_chains_and_trade_in_value_added

 

 

 

Services and Manufacturing : Patterns of Linkages

Expert Group Meeting on “Global Value Chains, Regional Integration and Sustainable Development: Asia-Pacific Perspectives”

12 Dec 2014 – UNESCAP, Bangkok

Click to access EGM-Session%203-Andre%20Wirjo.pdf

 

 

 

The 3rd Capacity Building Workshop on Strategic Framework on Measurement of APEC TiVA under GVCs and its Action Plan

APEC

2017

https://aimp2.apec.org/sites/PDB/Lists/Proposals/DispForm.aspx?ID=2012

 

 

 

 

Capacity Building Workshop on Strategic Framework on Measurement of APEC TiVA under GVCs and its Action Plan

APEC

2016

https://aimp2.apec.org/sites/PDB/Lists/Proposals/DispForm.aspx?ID=1831

 

 

 

 

Enhancing Value Chains An Agenda for APEC

CSIS

2013

Click to access EnhancingValueChains%20Report.pdf

 

 

 

Changing Patterns of Trade and Global Value Chains in Postcrisis Asia

Ganeshan Wignaraja

Juzhong Zhuang

Mahinthan J. Mariasingham

Madeline Dumaua-Cabauatan

2017

Click to access changing-patterns-trade-gvc.pdf

 

 

 

Global value chains in a changing world

Edited by Deborah K. Elms and Patrick Low

WTO

Click to access aid4tradeglobalvalue13_e.pdf

 

 

 

 

Trade in value added: Concepts, estimation and analysis,

Javorsek, Marko; Camacho, Ignacio

(2015) :

ARTNeT Working Paper Series, No. 150

Click to access 826594735.pdf

 

 

 

India’s Future in Asia: The APEC Opportunity

By Harsha V. Singh and Anubhav Gupta

 

Click to access ASPI_APEC_fullreport_online.pdf

 

 

 

Update on New Measurements of the Impacts of Globalization

James J. Fetzer and Thomas F. Howells III

Advisory Committee Meeting
Washington, DC
November 13, 2015

 

Click to access update-on-new-measurements-of-the-impacts-of-globalization.pdf

 

 

 

 

ASIA-PACIFIC
TRADE AND INVESTMENT REPORT 2016
Recent Trends and Developments

Shamshad Akhtar

Hongjoo Hahm

Susan F. Stone

Copyright © United Nations 2016

Click to access aptir-2016-full.pdf

 

 

 

 

Asia’s Rise in the
New World Trade Order
The Effects of Mega-Regional Trade Agreements on Asian Countries
Part 2 of the GED Study Series:
Effects of Mega-Regional Trade Agreements

 

Click to access NW_Asia_s_Rise_in_the_New_World_Trade_Order.pdf

 

 

 

The role of different types of firms in GVCs

GGDC 25th Anniversary Conference

 

Stephen Chong, Rutger Hoekstra, Oscar Lemmers, Ilke Van Beveren, Marcel van den Berg, Ron van der Wal, Piet Verbiest

Click to access presentation_lemmers.pdf

 

 

 

GLOBAL VALUE CHAINS AND SOUTH-SOUTH TRADE

UNCTAD

Click to access gdsecidc2015d1_en.pdf

 

 

 

 

Annex 5: Strategic Framework on Measurement of
APEC TiVA Under GVCs

APEC

Click to access 14_som2_049anx05.pdf

 

 

 

 

Estimating Extended Supply-Use Tables in Basic Prices with Firm Heterogeneity for the United States: A Proof of Concept

James J. Fetzer, Thomas F. Howells III, Lin Z. Jones, Erich H. Strassner, and Zhi Wang1

The Fourth World KLEMS Conference
Madrid, Spain
May 23-24, 2016

Click to access worldklems2016_Strassner.pdf

 

 

 

 “Participation of Developing Countries in Global Value Chains: Implications for Trade and Trade-Related Policies”

Kowalski, P. et al.

(2015),

OECD Trade Policy Papers, No. 179,
OECD Publishing, Paris

Click to access OECD_Trade_Policy_Papers_179.pdf

 

 

 

 

Complex Network Analysis for Characterizing Global Value Chains in Equipment Manufacturing.

Xiao H, Sun T, Meng B, Cheng L

(2017)

PLoS ONE 12(1):

Click to access pone.0169549.pdf

 

 

 

A Network of Networks Perspective on Global Trade.

Maluck J, Donner RV

(2015)

PLoS ONE 10(7)

Click to access pone.0133310.pdf

 

 

 

Trends of the World Input and Output Network of Global Trade.

del RõÂo-Chanona RM, Grujić J, Jeldtoft Jensen H

(2017)

PLoS ONE 12(1):

Click to access pone.0170817.pdf

 

 

 

World Input-Output Network.

Cerina F, Zhu Z, Chessa A, Riccaboni M

(2015)

PLoS ONE 10(7):

Click to access pone.0134025.pdf

 

 

 

FAQ on GVCs: some answers from the Global I-O tables approach

Rita Cappariello,

 

Click to access Rita-Cappariello.pdf

 

 

 

 

 

A Markovian model of evolving world input-output network.

Moosavi V, Isacchini G

(2017)

PLoS ONE 12(10):

Click to access pone.0186746.pdf

 

 

 

 

Hierarchicality of Trade Flow Networks Reveals Complexity of Products.

Shi P, Zhang J, Yang B, Luo J

(2014)

PLoS ONE 9(6):

Click to access pone.0098247.pdf

 

 

 

International Trade Modelling Using Open Flow Networks: A Flow-Distance Based Analysis.

Shen B, Zhang J, Li Y, Zheng Q, Li X
(2015)

PLoS ONE 10(11):

Click to access pone.0142936.pdf

 

 

 

THE EVOLVING GEOGRAPHY OF PRODUCTION HUBS AND REGIONAL VALUE CHAINS ACROSS EAST ASIA: TRADE IN VALUE-ADDED

G. Suder (Melbourne Business School), P. Liesch (UQ), S. Inomata (JETRO- IDE), I. Jormanainen (Aalto University) and B. Meng (JETRO- IDE and OECD),

For: Journal of World Business

 

https://minerva-access.unimelb.edu.au/bitstream/handle/11343/159095/The%20evolving%20geography%20of%20production%20hubs%20and%20regional%20value%20chains%20across%20East%20Asia-%20Trade%20in%20value-added.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y

 

 

 

 

AN ICIO SPLIT ACCORDING TO DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN OWNERSHIP:
THE OECD TIVA-MNE PROJECT

Charles Cadestin, Koen De Backer, Isabelle Desnoyers-James,
Sébastien Miroudot, Davide Rigo and Ming Ye

OECD

2017

Click to access 2757_20170515071_Cadestin_et_al_2017_ICIO_split_ownership.pdf

 

 

 

 

THE FIGARO PROJECT: THE EU INTER-COUNTRY SUPPLY, USE AND INPUT-OUTPUT TABLES

 

Click to access 2504_20160519071_Item10-12_FIGAROproject.pdf

 

 

Identifying Heterogeneity in the Production Components of Globally Engaged Business Enterprises in the United States

James Fetzer and Erich H. Strassner

June 10, 2015

US BEA

 

Click to access identifying-heterogeneity-in-the-production-components-of-globally-engaged-business-enterprises-in-the-united-states.pdf

 

 

The EU Inter-country Supply, Use and Input-Output Tables (FIGARO Project): Recent progress

Prepared by Eurostat

2017

Click to access 3_-_FIGARO_project.pdf

 

 

Tracing value-added and double counting in sales of foreign affiliates and domestic-owned companies

Sebastien Miroudot and ming ye

Trade and Agriculture Directorate, OECD, Trade and Agriculture Directorate, OECD

14 March 2018

Click to access MPRA_paper_85723.pdf

 

Identifying Heterogeneity in the Production Components of Globally Engaged Business Enterprises in the United States

Prepared by Bureau of Economic Analysis, U.S. Department of Commerce

2015

 

Click to access 11_Identifying_Heterogeneity__US_.pdf

 

 

 

 

Estimating Extended Supply-Use Tables in Basic Prices with Firm Heterogeneity for the United States: A Proof of Concept (Draft)

Prepared by the United States

2017

 

Click to access 7_-_Estimating_Extended_Supply-Use_Tables_in_Basic_Prices.pdf

 

 

TIVA: CONSTRUCTING THE ICIO TABLE AND FUTURE WORK

 

Fabienne Fortanier (Head of Trade Statistics, OECD) Christophe Degain (Senior Statistician, WTO)

OECD

Click to access Session%2012_WTO-OECD%20SUT%20and%20ICIOT%20-%20Training%20module%20(ECA)%20-%20English%20Final.pdf

 

 

 

 

FIGARO
Full International and Global Accounts for Research in Input-
Output analysis
The EU Inter-country Supply, Use and Input-Output Tables

José M. Rueda-Cantuche

Isabelle Rémond-Tiedrez

Item 4, NAWG Meeting, Luxembourg, 11 May 2016

Click to access Item_4d_FIGARO_UNECE_new.pdf

 

 

 

OECD-WTO Trade in Value Added (TiVA) data: introduction

OECD

 

Click to access Session%2011_WTO-OECD%20TiVA%20intro%20-%20Training%20module%20(ECA)%20-%20English%20FINAL.pdf

 

 

 

Trade and Investment Linkages in Global Value Chains: Insights from the new TiVA-MNE Dataset

OECD

2016

 

Click to access trade-investment-linkages-in-gvc.pdf

 

 

INTERCONNECTED ECONOMIES:
BENEFITING FROM INDUSTRY GLOBALISATION

Dirk Pilat,

Global Industry and Economy Forum 2013:
Fostering Industrial Innovation through
Creativity
Seoul, 24 June 2013

 

 

Calculating Trade in Value Added

Prepared by Aqib Aslam, Natalija Novta, and Fabiano Rodrigues-Bastos1

July 2017

IMF

https://www.imf.org/~/media/Files/Publications/WP/2017/wp17178.ashx

 

Understanding Trade in Intermediate Goods

Understanding Trade in Intermediate Goods

 

One of the key source of International Trade statistics is a document published by the UNCTAD since 2013:

Key Statistics and Trends in International Trade

Please see references below to access reports for 2015 and 2016.

 

In 2014, out of USD 18.5 trillion in global trade, about USD 8 trillion was in intermediate goods.

 

From TRADE IN INTERMEDIATE GOODS AND SERVICES

Introduction: the international dimension of the exchange of intermediate inputs

1. Trade in intermediate inputs has been steadily growing over the last decade. However, despite the internationalisation of production and the increasing importance of outsourcing and foreign investment, some studies have found little rise in intermediate goods trade as a share of total trade1. More than half of goods trade is however made up of intermediate inputs and trade in services is even more of an intermediate type with about three quarters of trade flows being comprised of intermediate services. Trade in intermediate goods and services thus deserves special attention from trade policymakers and so far few studies have investigated how it differs from trade in consumption goods or services.

2. An intermediate good can be defined as an input to the production process that has itself been produced and, unlike capital, is used up in production3. The difference between intermediate and capital goods lies in the latter entering as a fixed asset in the production process. Like any primary factor (such as labour, land, or natural resources) capital is used but not used up in the production process4. On the contrary, an intermediate good is used, often transformed, and incorporated in the final output. As an input, an intermediate good has itself been produced and is hence defined in contrast to a primary input. As an output, an intermediate good is used to produce other goods (or services) contrary to a final good which is consumed and can be referred to as a “consumption good”.

3. Intermediate inputs are not restricted to material goods; they can also consist of services. Thelatter can be potentially used as an input to any sector of the economy; that is for the production of the same, or other services, as well as manufacturing goods. Symmetrically, manufacturing goods can be potentially used to produce the same, or other manufacturing goods, as well as services.

4. An important question we can ask is how to identify inputs among all goods and services produced in an economy. Many types of goods can be easily distinguished as inputs, when their use excludes them from final consumption. Notable examples include chemical substances, construction materials, or business services. The exact same type of good used as an input to some production process can however be destined to consumption. For instance, oranges can be sold to households as a final good, as well as to a factory as an input for food preparation. Telecommunication services can be sold to individuals or to business services firms as an intermediate input for their output. The United Nations distinguish commodities in each basic heading on the basis of the main end-use (United Nations, 2007). It is however recognized that many commodities that are traded internationally may be put to a variety of uses. Other methodologies involve the use of input-output (I-O) tables to distinguish between intermediate and consumption goods.

5. The importance of intermediate goods and services in the economy and trade is associated with a number of developments in the last decades. Growth and increased sophistication of production has given birth to strategies involving fragmentation and reorganisation of firm’s activities, both in terms of ownership boundaries, as in terms of the location for production. In what follows, the international dimension of the exchange of intermediate goods and services is explored by clarifying terms and concepts as well as the links between trade in intermediate inputs and FDI.

From Key Statistics and Trends in International Trade 2015

inter8

 

From Key Statistics and Trends in International Trade 2015

inter2

 From Key Statistics and Trends in International Trade 2015

inter3

From Key Statistics and Trends in International Trade 2015

inter4

From Key Statistics and Trends in International Trade 2015

inter

From Key Statistics and Trends in International Trade 2015

inter5

From Key Statistics and Trends in International Trade 2015

inter6

From Key Statistics and Trends in International Trade 2015

inter7

From Key Statistics and Trends in International Trade 2015

Trade networks relating to global value chains have evolved during the last 10 years. In 2004, the East Asian production network was still in its infancy. Most trade flows of parts and components concerned the USA and the European Union, with a number of other countries loosely connected with these two main hubs. As of 2014 trade of parts and components was much more developed. The current state is characterized not only by the prominent role of China, but also by a much more tightly integrated network with a much larger number of countries many of which have multiple connections to different hubs.

From Mapping Global Value Chains: Intermediate Goods Trade and Structural Change in the World Economy

inter10inter11inter12

Key sources of Research:

 

TRADE IN INTERMEDIATE GOODS AND SERVICES

OECD Trade Policy Working Paper No. 93
by Sébastien Miroudot, Rainer Lanz and Alexandros Ragoussis

2009

Click to access 44056524.pdf

 

 

An Essay on Intra-Industry Trade in Intermediate Goods

Rosanna Pittiglio

2014

Click to access ME_2014051916452646.pdf

 

 

The Rise of International Supply Chains: Implications for Global Trade

Click to access GETR_Chapter1.2.pdf

 

 

 

Growing Trade in Intermediate Goods: Outsourcing, Global Sourcing or Increasing
Importance of MNE Networks?

by
Jörn Kleinert
October 2000

Click to access kap1006.pdf

 

 

 

Imported Inputs and the Gains from Trade

Ananth Ramanarayanan
University of Western Ontario
September, 2014

https://www.economics.utoronto.ca/index.php/index/research/downloadSeminarPaper/49816

 

 

 

Key Statistics and Trends in International Trade 2015

Division on International Trade in Goods and Services, and Commodities
United Nations Conference on Trade and Development

Click to access ditctab2015d1_en.pdf

 

 

 

Key Statistics and Trends in International Trade 2016

Division on International Trade in Goods and Services, and Commodities
United Nations Conference on Trade and Development

Click to access ditctab2016d3_en.pdf

 

 

Integration of Trade and Disintegration of Production in the Global Economy

Robert C. Feenstra
Revised, April 1998

http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.39.7178&rep=rep1&type=pdf

 

 

 

GLOBAL VALUE CHAINS: CHALLENGES, OPPORTUNITIES, AND IMPLICATIONS FOR POLICY

OECD, WTO and World Bank Group
Report prepared for submission to the G20 Trade Ministers Meeting Sydney, Australia, 19 July 2014

Click to access gvc_report_g20_july_2014.pdf

 

 

Trade in Value Added: Concepts, Estimation and Analysis

Marko Javorsek* and Ignacio Camacho

20015

Click to access AWP150Trade%20in%20Value%20Added.pdf

 

 

The Similarities and Differences among Three Major Inter-Country Input-Output Databases and their Implications for Trade in Value-Added Estimates

Lin Jones and Zhi Wang, United States International Trade Commission Li Xin, Beijing Normal University and Peking University Christophe Degain, World Trade Organization

December, 2014

Click to access ec201412b.pdf

 

 

Advanced Topics in Trade
Lecture 9 – Multinational Firms and Foreign Direct Investment

Heiwai Tang – SAIS
April 8, 2015

Click to access lecture_8_new.pdf

 

 

Efforts to Measure Trade in Value-Added and Map Global Value Chains: A Guide

Andrew Reamer

May 29, 2014

Click to access Reamer_ISA_Trade_in_Value_Added_05-29-2014.pdf

 

 

 

Global Value Chains for Value Added and Intermediate Goods in Asia

N Shrestha

20015

Click to access CESSA%20WP%202015-07.pdf

 

 

 

Global Value Chains: The New Reality of International Trade

Sherry Stephenson
December 2013

Click to access E15-GVCs-Stephenson-Final.pdf

 

 

Asia and Global Production Networks Implications for Trade, Incomes and Economic Vulnerability

Benno Ferrarini

David Hummels

20014

Click to access asia-and-global-production-networks.pdf

 

 

Participation of Developing Countries in Global Value Chains:
Implications for Trade and Trade-Related Policies

by
Przemyslaw Kowalski, Javier Lopez Gonzalez, Alexandros Ragoussis
and Cristian Ugarte

Click to access OECD_Trade_Policy_Papers_179.pdf

 

 

GLOBAL VALUE CHAINS: SURVEYING DRIVERS, MEASURES AND IMPACTS

João Amador
Sónia Cabral

2014

Click to access wp20143.pdf

 

World Intermediate goods Exports By Country and Region

2014

WITS World International Trade Statistics

http://wits.worldbank.org/CountryProfile/en/Country/WLD/Year/2014/TradeFlow/Export/Partner/all/Product/UNCTAD-SoP2

 

 

Trade in global value chains

2013

WTO

Click to access its13_highlights4_e.pdf

 

 

The Rise of Trade in Intermediates: Policy Implications

  • February 10, 2011

http://carnegieendowment.org/2011/02/10/rise-of-trade-in-intermediates-policy-implications-pub-42578

 

 

International trade with intermediate and final goods under economic crisis

Elżbieta Czarny, Warsaw School of Economics
Paweł Folfas, Warsaw School of Economics
Katarzyna Śledziewska, Warsaw University

Click to access 375.pdf

 

 

 

Trade in Intermediate Goods: Implications for Productivity and Welfare in Korea

Young Gui Kim

Hak K. PYO

Date Written: December 30, 2016

 

https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2929118

 

 

Growing Together: Economic Ties between the United States and Mexico

BY CHRISTOPHER WILSON

Click to access growing_together_economic_ties_between_the_united_states_and_mexico.pdf

 

 

Mapping Global Value Chains: Intermediate Goods Trade and Structural Change in the World Economy

Timothy J. Sturgeon
Olga Memedovic

Click to access WP%2005%20Mapping%20Glocal%20Value%20Chains.pdf

 

India’s Intermediate Goods Trade in the Inter Regional Value Chain:
An examination based on Trade data and Input Output Analysis

Simi Thambi

Click to access 10_2%20fp.pdf

 

Global Supply Chains

Click to access pub4253_2.pdf

 

 

Global value chains in a changing world

Edited by Deborah K. Elms and Patrick Low

Click to access aid4tradeglobalvalue13_e.pdf

 

Trends in Intra Firm Trade of USA

Trends in Intra Firm Trade of USA

 

 

Intra Firm Trade

Intra-firm trade consist of trade between parent companies of a compiling country with their affiliates abroad and trade of affiliates under foreign control in this compiling country with their foreign parent group.

Intra Industry Trade

Different types of trade are captured in measurements of intra-industry trade:

a) Trade in similar products (“horizontal trade”) with differentiated varieties (e.g. cars of a similar class and price range).

b) Trade in “vertically differentiated” products distinguished by quality and price (e.g. exports of high-quality clothing and imports of lower-quality clothing).

 

From GLOBALISATION AND INTRA-FIRM TRADE: AN EMPIRICAL NOTE

 

Products which are traded internationally, but which stay within the ambit of a multinational enterprise (MNE), represent a significant portion of foreign trade for several OECD countries. This type of trade is called intra-firm trade as opposed to international trade among unrelated parties, also called arm’s length trade. Intra-firm trade is an important part of the process of globalisation, by which is meant the increasing interdependence of markets and production in different countries through trade in goods and services, cross-border flows of capital, and exchanges of technology.

The phenomenon of intra-firm trade is of interest to trade policy makers, as well as to competition and tax authorities. The use of transfer pricing in intra-firm trade may introduce an element of uncertainty into the value of a fairly large part of international trade and into customs valuation needed for the application of tariffs or similar measures. Competition and tax issues may also arise from intra-firm trade to the extent that the latter may facilitate the dissimulation of real transaction prices between the parent company and its affiliates.

A surge in foreign direct investment (FDI) during the 1980s’ has been cited as evidence in favour of globalisation; it is argued that MNEs have played a central role in globalisation by extending their corporate networks beyond national boundaries through the establishment of foreign branches and subsidiaries. It is often assumed that intra-firm trade reflects these foreign production activities by MNEs, as they trans- fer their factors of production from one country to another.

Little attention has been paid so far to the phenomenon of intra-firm trade. The literature on the subject is still relatively limited and recent. This is partly because most international trade statistics do not distinguish between intra-firm trade and arm’s length trade.

 

From GLOBALISATION AND INTRA-FIRM TRADE: AN EMPIRICAL NOTE

In considering the interrelationship between globalisation and international trade, it is conceptually useful to distinguish between four types of international trade:

(A) intra industry, intra-firm trade;

(B) intra-industry, arm’s-length trade;

(C) inter-industry, intra firm trade;

(D) inter-industry, arm’s-length trade.

Intra-industry trade is defined as the mutual exchange of similar goods within the same product category (Grubel and Lloyd, 1975, and Greenaway and Milner, 1986).

Intra-industry trade is generally a function of product differentiation and may or may not involve intra-firm trade. If motor vehicles produced in France are exported to the United States and U.S.-built motor vehicles are exported to France, the two countries are said to be involved in intra-industry trade even though such trade is not necessarily intra-firm trade. Intra-industry trade can be readily calculated for any given product category, as only the traditional bilateral trade statistics for that product category are needed.

Intra firm trade is harder to quantify, since knowledge of the relationship between the firms involved in the transactions is necessary. Data on intra-firm trade are available only. through firm surveys, involving the preparation of questionnaires by national authorities.

Most trade in manufactured goods among OECD countries is of the intra-industry type.  Intra-industry trade is particularly important within Europe, and to a lesser extent, in North America, accounting for roughly 60 to 70 per cent of total trade in manufacture.  This trade generally concerns differentiated products exchanged between countries that are similar in terms of per capita income and relative factor endowments. It has also been argued that economies of scale play an important role in explaining the industry pattern of intra-industry trade.

On the other hand, trade between developed and developing countries (“North-South”) is mostly of the inter-industry type, reflecting large differences in relative factor endowments between the two groups of countries. Inter-industry trade among unrelated parties (type D) – e.g. international exchange of cotton cloth produced by northern manufacturers for wine produced by southern farmers .- is the type of trade which international trade textbooks traditionally deal with.

Trade in manufactured goods between developed countries is predominantly of the intra-industry type and often takes the form of intra-firm trade. An important example of intra-industry, intra-firm trade (Type A) is United States-Canada-Mexico automobile trade. Intra-firm trade is also the dominant pattern of U.S. exports to Canada and Europe in the case of non-electrical machinery and chemicals. Another example is trade in manufactured goods between Pacific Asian economies. These economies have seen a rapid increase in intra-industry trade as a proportion of their total trade over the last decade. Such increase in intra-industry trade in Pacific Asian economies can be primarily attributed to the globalisation of corporate activities by U.S. and Japanese firms and, more recently, by other Asian firms. This involves assembly-line production based on imported parts and components in different countries in East and South East Asia (Fukasaku, 1992; Gross, 1986).

 

 

IFT

 

From An Overview of U.S. Intrafirm-trade Data Sources

 

ift2

There are large differences in BEA data and Census data particularly for Imports.  There are some measurement issues.  Import data from Mexico and China show big errors.

 

From An Overview of U.S. Intrafirm-trade Data Sources

IFT3

 

From An Overview of U.S. Intrafirm-trade Data Sources

IFT4

 

Data sources of Intra Firm Trade

  • BEA (Intra Firm Trade Data)
  • US Census Bureau (Related party trade data)

 

From Intrafirm Trade and Vertical Fragmentation in U.S. Multinational Corporations

First, we show that, although intra-MNC trade represents an important fraction of aggregate U.S. exports and imports, the median manufacturing foreign affiliate ships nothing to — and receives nothing from — its parent in the United States. Intra-MNC trade is concentrated in a small group of large affiliates and large corporations: The largest five percent of affiliates accounts for around half of the total trade to and from the parent, while the largest five percent of corporations accounts for almost two thirds of total intra- MNC trade. This skewness is also observed within the corporation: Intra-MNC trade tends to be concentrated in a small number of an MNC’s largest foreign affiliates.

The lack of intra-MNC cross-border trade that we find for foreign affiliates of U.S. multinationals is more surprising than the similar finding in Atalay et al. (2014) for intrafirm trade within the United States. Factor price differences — the theoretical motivation for vertical fragmentation and the intrafirm trade that accompanies it — are much larger across countries than across U.S. cities. In this regard, Brainard (1993) first documented the weak relationship between factor endowments and intra-MNC trade across borders.

The skewness of intra-MNC trade towards large affiliates and corporations in our first finding is reminiscent of the skewness in the distributions of other international activities. Manufacturing exports are concentrated in large firms (Bernard and Jensen, 1995), and even larger firms own foreign affiliates (Helpman et al., 2004). These patterns are consistent with theories of the firm that are based on economies of scale in production. In Grossman et al. (2006), for example, the production of inputs for the entire multinational corporation is concentrated into a few large affiliates, which exploit the strong economies of scale in production. Affiliates created to supply a foreign market — as an alternative to exporting, in order to avoid transportation costs — are relatively small. The model predicts that a small number of large affiliates ship goods within the corporation, while numerous smaller affiliates serve local markets. The concentration of intra-MNC trade in the largest firms is also consistent with the contract theory of the multinational firm proposed by Antras and Helpman (2004): In their framework with heterogeneous firms, only the largest firms choose to integrate offshore activities.

Our second set of facts relates intra-MNC trade to the upstream and downstream links between the industries of the parent and affiliate, as defined by the U.S. input-output table. As previously shown in Alfaro and Charlton (2009), we find that multinational corporations own affiliates in industries that are vertically linked to the parent’s industry. The input-output coefficient between the affiliate’s and the parent’s industries of operation, however, is not related to the existence and the magnitude of the trade in goods between the two. These findings are similar to those in Atalay et al. (2014), who study multi-establishment firms within the United States: The ownership of vertically linked affiliates is not related to the transfer of goods within the boundaries of the firm.

 

 

 

Key Sources of Research:

 

GLOBALISATION AND INTRA-FIRM TRADE: AN EMPIRICAL NOTE

Marcos Bonturi and Kiichiro Fukasaku

1993

Click to access 33948827.pdf

 

 

U.S. Direct Investment Abroad: Trends and Current Issues

James K. Jackson
Specialist in International Trade and Finance

June 29, 2017

Click to access RS21118.pdf

 

Foreign Direct Investment in the United States (FDIUS): Final Results from the 2012 Benchmark Survey

 

https://www.bea.gov/international/fdius2012_final.htm

 

 

U.S. Direct Investment Abroad (USDIA): Revised 2009 Benchmark Data

https://www.bea.gov/international/usdia2009r.htm

 

U.S. Intrafirm Trade in Goods

By William J. Zeile

1997

Click to access 0297iid.pdf

 

Global Production: Firms, Contracts, and Trade Structure

Pol Antràs
Harvard University
June, 2015

Click to access global_production_slides.pdf

 

 

Trade in Goods Within Multinational Companies:
Survey-Based Data and Findings for the United States of America

William J. Zeile
U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis
Washington, DC 20230
2003

Click to access IFT_OECD_Zeile.pdf

 

 

An Overview of U.S. Intrafirm-trade Data Sources

Kim J. Ruhl
New York University Stern School of Business
May 2013

Click to access Ruhl_USIntrafirm-tradeData_May2013.pdf

 

 

How Well is U.S. Intrafirm Trade Measured?

By KIM J. RUHL

20015

Click to access How_Well_March_2015.pdf

 

 

 

An Overview of U.S. Intrafirm-trade Data Sources

Kim J. Ruhl
New York University Stern School of Business
May 2013

http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.343.7532&rep=rep1&type=pdf

 

 

THE DETERMINANTS OF INTRAFIRM TRADE

Gregory Corcos

Delphine M. Irac

Giordano Miony

Thierry Verdier

First draft: January 26, 2008. This draft : December 9, 2010.

Click to access coirmive.pdf

 

 

MULTINATIONAL FIRMS AND THE STRUCTURE OF INTERNATIONAL TRADE

Pol Antràs
Stephen R.Yeaple

Working Paper 18775

February 2013

Click to access w18775.pdf

 

 

INTRA-FIRM TRADE AND PRODUCT CONTRACTIBILITY (LONG VERSION)

Andrew B. Bernard
J. Bradford Jensen
Stephen J. Redding
Peter K. Schott

April 2010

Click to access w15881.pdf

 

 

FIRMS, CONTRACTS, AND TRADE STRUCTURE

POL ANTRAS

Click to access fcts.pdf

 

 

On Intra-firm Trade and Multinationals: Offshoring and Foreign Outsourcing in Manufacturing

  • Ashok Deo Bardhan
  • Dwight Jaffee

https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1057%2F9780230522954_2

 

 

INTRAFIRM TRADE AND VERTICAL FRAGMENTATION IN U.S. MULTINATIONAL
CORPORATIONS

Natalia Ramondo
Veronica Rappoport
Kim J. Ruhl
August 2015

Click to access w21472.pdf

 

 

 

INTRA-FIRM TRADE: PATTERNS, DETERMINANTS AND POLICY IMPLICATIONS

Rainer Lanz,
Sébastien Miroudot,

OECD

Click to access 5kg9p39lrwnn.pdf

 

 

Intrafirm Trade and Product Contractibility

By Andrew B. Bernard, J. Bradford Jensen, Stephen J. Redding,
and Peter K. Schott

Click to access Intrafirm_trade_and_product_compatibility_(lsero).pdf

 

Vertical Specialization in Multinational Firms

Gordon H. Hanson

Raymond J. Mataloni, Jr.

Matthew J. Slaughter

Initial Draft: September 2002

Click to access VertSpec.pdf

 

 

GLOBAL VALUE CHAINS SURVEYING DRIVERS AND MEASURES

João Amador and Sónia Cabral

2014

https://www.ecb.europa.eu/pub/pdf/scpwps/ecbwp1739.en.pdf?13f6d86f40a3c60325f27cbc08a18742

Click to access wp20143.pdf

 

 

EU-US ECONOMIC LINKAGES:
THE ROLE OF MULTINATIONALS AND INTRA-FIRM TRADE

C. Lakatos and T. Fukui

2013

Click to access tradoc_151922.%202_November%202013.pdf

 

 

THREE ESSAYS ON INTRAFIRM TRADE

Sooyoung Lee

2015

http://scholar.colorado.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1061&context=econ_gradetds

 

 

 

On Intra-Firm Trade and Multinationals: Foreign Outsourcing and Offshoring in Manufacturing

Ashok Deo Bardhan

Dwight Jaffee

2004

Click to access d993275ddc9ba520060c9022fb84435a4d6a.pdf

 

International Fragmentation of Production and the Intrafirm Trade
of U.S. Multinational Companies

Maria Borga and William J. Zeile

January 22, 2004

Click to access intrafirmtradejanuary04.pdf

 

 

 

Globalization and trade flows: what you see is not what you get!

Andreas Maurer and Christophe Degain

Click to access ersd201012_e.pdf

 

 

How US corporations structure their international production chains

Natalia Ramondo, Veronica Rappoport, Kim Ruhl

07 October 2015

http://voxeu.org/article/international-production-networks-and-intra-firm-trade-new-evidence

 

 

 

WHY DO FIRMS OWN PRODUCTION CHAINS?

Enghin Atalay
Ali Hortacsu
Chad Syverson

April 2012

Click to access w18020.pdf

 

 

 

Vertical Integration and Input Flows

Enghin Atalay

Ali Hortaçsu

Chad Syverson

August, 2013

Click to access verticalownership.pdf

Click to access viplantevidence.pdf

 

 

Outsourcing versus Vertical Integration: A Dynamic Model of Industry Equilibrium.

Román Fossati

March 2014

Click to access 1March2014-RomanFossati.pdf

 

 

Production Networks, Geography and Firm Performance

Andrew B. Bernardy

Andreas Moxnesz

Yukiko U. Saitox

This Version: May 2014 –

Click to access MOXNES%20-%20j_network_ERWIT4.pdf

 

 

 

 

Vertical Integration and Firm Boundaries: The Evidence

FRANCINE LAFONTAINE AND MARGARET SLADE

2007

Click to access Lafontaine_Slade%20-%20Vertical%20integration%20and%20firm%20boundaries.pdf

 

 

 

 

Foreign affiliates with and without intra-firm trade:
Evidence from sub-Saharan Africa

Sotiris Blanas

Adnan Seric

Click to access WP_13.pdf

 

 

 

Outsourcing, Vertical Integration, and Cost Reduction

Simon Loertscher†

Michael H. Riordan‡

September 8, 2014

Click to access Loertscher_Outsourcing.pdf

 

 

 

VERTICAL PRODUCTION NETWORKS IN MULTINATIONAL FIRMS

Gordon H. Hanson
Raymond J. Mataloni, Jr.
Matthew J. Slaughter

May 2003

Click to access w9723.pdf

 

 

Network structure of production

Enghin Atalaya, Ali Hortaçsua,1, James Robertsb, and Chad Syversonc

Edited by Lars Peter Hansen, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, and approved February 2, 2011 (received for review October 15, 2010)

Click to access pnas.201015564.pdf

 

 

 

Cross-border Vertical Integration and Intra-firm Trade:
New evidence from Korean and Japanese firm-level data

Hyunbae CHUN

Jung HUR

Young Gak KIM

Hyeog Ug KWON

Click to access 17e049.pdf

Click to access chun_aep_2017.pdf

 

 

 

Offshoring in the Global Economy
Lecture 1: Microeconomic Structure
Lecture 2: Macroeconomic Implications

Robert C. Feenstra

September 2008
http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.294.715&rep=rep1&type=pdf

 

 

 

THE NETWORK STRUCTURE OF INTERNATIONAL TRADE

Thomas Chaney

January 2011

Click to access w16753.pdf

The Collapse of Global Trade during Global Financial Crisis of 2008-2009

The Collapse of Global Trade during Global Financial Crisis of 2008-2009

There are three broad categories of global Trade.

  • Trade in Commodities
  • Trade in Manufactured Goods
  • Trade in Services

During the Financial Crisis, Trade in commodities declined due to increase in Prices.

Trade in Services were largely unaffected.

Trade in Manufactured goods declined sharply for variety of reasons not yet entirely clear.

 

Potential Causes for decline

  • Fall in Aggregate Demand of goods
  • Constrained Trade Finance
  • Increase in Trade Barriers
  • Impact of Global Value Chains

 

From GLOBAL VALUE CHAINS IN A POSTCRISIS WORLD A DEVELOPMENT PERSPECTIVE

The global economic crisis of 2008–09 has revealed the interdependence of the world economy. The financial crisis originated in the United States, but the resulting economic downturn quickly spread to the rest of the world. Trade, along with finance, was one of the main vectors of transmission of the crisis. In 2009, there was a massive contraction in global trade—minus 13 percent. The contraction was largely a reflection of a drop in demand, especially for durable goods. The fact that the shock was transmitted very rapidly reflects the increasing reliance by businesses on so-called global value chains (GVCs)—the process of ever-finer specialization and geographic fragmentation of production, with the more labor-intensive parts of the production process transferred to developing countries. In a world where GVCs are the prevalent business model for multinational corporations, a reduction in demand for final products by global buyers implies that demand shocks are immediately transmitted “upstream” to subcontractors in developing countries.

 

From Resilient to the crisis? Global supply chains and trade flows

According to the most recent IMF estimates (IMF 2009), the ongoing recovery will drive a wedge between output and trade. Output is supposed to shrink by ‘only’ 1.1% at the end of 2009 (-3.4% in advanced economies), but world trade is forecast to still experience a drop of -11.9%. While other estimates put the latter figure at –9% (WTO, World Bank), it is indisputable that during 2009 official figures recording trade flows will fall much more than GDP.

Apart from its magnitude, the fall in trade in 2009 has also been quite homogeneous across all countries (more than 90% of OECD countries have exhibited simultaneously a decline in exports and imports exceeding 10%, as noted by Araujo and Olivera Martins 2009). This fall has also been very fast, with trade virtually grinding to a halt in the last month of 2008.1 These facts led Baldwin and Evenett (2009) to qualify the drop in trade during the crisis as “severe, sudden and synchronised”.

A number of transmission mechanisms have recently been proposed to account for these three attributes of the contraction of trade flows, many of which impinge upon the role that global supply chains might have played in exacerbating the drop in global demand.

The basic argument is that in a world characterised increasingly by vertical specialisation, goods are produced sequentially in stages across different countries – so-called international supply chains. The constituent parts and components of a final good crosses borders several times before the final product reaches the consumer; at each border crossing, the full value of the partially assembled good is recorded as trade. As a result, for a given reduction in world income, trade should decline “not only by the value of the finished product, but also by the value of all the intermediate trade flows that went into creating it”.

This implies that the extensive presence of supply chains does not automatically explain why world trade overshot the world GDP drop; other explanatory factors are needed. These may include:

  • The collapse in internal demand and production, affecting current and future level of (tradable) inventories worldwide;
  • Fiscal stimulus plans with a relatively stronger support of non-tradable sectors, like construction and infrastructures (Bénassy-Quéré et al. 2009);
  • The rise of ‘murky’ protectionism; and
  • The problems of trade finance with financial spreads still well-above ‘normal’ (i.e. pre-crisis) market rates (Auboin, 2009).

Do the above arguments mean that global supply chains are totally neutral as a transmission mechanism of the crisis from GDP to trade? Of course not. In all likelihood, however, the channels are much more complex than originally thought, and entail important compositional effects.

For the sake of argument, let us take the following story based on the idea that a relatively large part of the overreaction of trade has been caused by the sudden drying up of liquidity in trade finance. Auboin (2009) notes that, in the second part of 2008, spreads on short-term trade credit facilities suddenly soared to between 300 to 600 basis points above LIBOR, compared to 10 to 20 basis points in normal times, leading to a virtual freeze of important trade deals throughout the globe, with supply chain operations being disrupted by lack of financing, especially for developing country suppliers.

Under this assumption we would have a scenario in which the liquidity channel has led trade to overshoot the fall in demand, with the effect being larger within supply chains, as the trade financing of these operations is typically managed by large international financial institutions, particularly hit by the crisis.3

In this scenario, we would still obtain a severe, sudden and synchronised drop in trade flows, with the effects correlated with (but not caused by) the behaviour of global supply chains.

Moreover, under the same scenario, we would also observe that, during the crisis,trade falls more along the intensive margin (i.e. value per trade) than the extensive margins (i.e. number of traders). The reason being that, if the overreaction of trade was caused relatively more by liquidity constraints than by a disruption of supply chains, the above effects would lead to a reduction in the volume of trade, but not necessarily to a similar reduction in the number of traders worldwide.

This is exactly what Bricongne et al. (2009) find in a paper analysing the behaviour of French exporters during the crisis. Relying on monthly data for individual French exporters observed until April 2009, the authors find that the drop in French exports is mainly due to the intensive margin of large exporters, with small and large firms evenly affected once sectoral and geographical specialisation are controlled for. Interestingly, they also find that firms (small and large) in sectors more dependent on external finance are the most affected by the crisis.

While any conclusion must wait for more data to become available, there are good reasons to believe that the rise of global supply chains has not necessarily been the main cause of the recent “severe, sudden and synchronised” fall in global trade flows. Based on the available evidence, one may even be tempted to conclude that, under certain circumstances, international networks of production may also display some degree of ‘resilience’ to adverse shocks like the current crisis: supply-chain-related trade flows may react later (rather than sooner) to an adverse shock. Their fall may be smaller and, eventually, their recovery may happen faster relative to overall trade flows.

The observed resilience of supply chains may arise from some intrinsic attribute of production chains, as argued above. Alternatively, it may be the outcome of the political economy. Fearing that a collapse of supply chains would set off a sudden process of de-globalisation and implosion of international trade, governments may intervene in favour of supply chains. For example, the massive bail-outs of large financial institutions have helped their best customers, among them the big players within supply chains. Finally, of course, this indirect support of supply chains may have also been an unintended consequence of financial bailouts implemented for very different reasons.

 

From UNCTAD Global Value Chains: Investment and Trade for Development

gvc

 

Key Terms

  • BLS ( Bureau of Labor Statistics)
  • UNCTAD ( United Nations Conference on Trade and Development)
  • NIPAs ( National Income and Product Accounts)
  • OECD ( Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development)
  • EBRD (European Bank for Reconstruction and Development)
  • WTO (world Trade Organization)
  • GATT (General Agreement on Trade and Tariffs)
  • ILO (International Labor Organization)
  • ADB (Asian Development Bank)
  • UNIDO ( United Nations Industrial Development Organization)
  • BEA ( Bureau of Economic Analysis)
  • Production Networks
  • Vertical Specialization
  • Production Fragmentation
  • Intermediate Goods
  • Network Linkages
  • Global Supply Chains
  • Global Value Chains (GVCs)
  • Production Sharing
  • Inter Industry Input Output Tables
  • Inter Country Input Output Tables
  • Global Networks
  • Multi National Companies ( MNCs)
  • Regional Economic Integration
  • Trade Globalization
  • Trade in Goods and Services
  • Trade in Value Added (TIVA)
  • World Input Output Database (WIOD)
  • OECD-WTO TIVA Database
  • UNCTAD-EORA GVC Database
  • Global Trade Analysis Project (GTAP) Database
  • Institute of Developing Economies (IDE-JETRO) Asian IO Tables
  • World Input Output Network (WION)
  • Global Multi Regional Input Output (GMRIO) Framework
  • EXIOBASE/EXIOPOL EXIOBASE is a global, detailed Multi-regional Environmentally Extended Supply and Use / Input Output (MR EE SUT/IOT) database.

 

 

Key Sources of Research:

 

The Global Trade Slowdown: Cyclical or Structural?

Cristina Constantinescu, Aaditya Mattoo, and Michele Ruta

2015

Click to access wp1506.pdf

 

 

The future of global trade: Where are we heading and should we be concerned?

Gaaitzen de Vries
Bart Los
Robert Stehrer
Marcel Timmer

2016

https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2016/11/the-future-of-global-trade-where-are-we-heading

 

 

Demand Spillovers and the Collapse of Trade in the Global Recession

Rudolfs Bems Robert C. Johnson

Kei-Mu Yi

2010

http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.186.7680&rep=rep1&type=pdf

 

 

Vertical Linkages and the Collapse of Global Trade

Rudolfs Bems
Robert C. Johnson
Kei-Mu Yi

AMERICAN ECONOMIC REVIEW
VOL. 101, NO. 3, MAY 2011

Click to access 600661c5f17781a38ca3168026b8663b8ebb.pdf

 

 

The Role of Vertical Linkages in the Propagation of the Global Downturn of 2008

Rudolfs Bems Robert C. Johnson

Kei-Mu Yi

2010

 

Click to access 0e43be03f9da1c48a385b94fbcc4904a3fb0.pdf

 

 

The Great Trade Collapse

Rudolfs Bems, Robert C. Johnson and Kei-Mu Yi

Annual Review of Economics
Vol.5:1-549 (Volume publication date August 2013)

 

 

GLOBAL VALUE CHAINS DURING THE GREAT TRADE COLLAPSE

A BULLWHIP EFFECT?

by Carlo Altomonte, Filippo Di Mauro, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Armando Rungi and Vincent Vicard

2012

 

Click to access 169822.pdf

 

 

The bullwhip effect and the Great Trade Collapse

Veronika Zavacka

 

Click to access wp0148.pdf

 

 

Trade Finance and the Great Trade Collapse

By JaeBin Ahn, Mary Amiti, and David E. Weinstein

2011

 

Click to access Ahn-Amiti-WeinsteinAERPP.pdf

 

 

Economic Crisis and Global Supply Chains 

Agnès Bénassy-Quéré, Yvan Decreux, Lionel Fontagné & David Khoudour-Casteras

Click to access wp2009-15.pdf

 

 

 

The Financial Crisis and Global Supply Chains

 

Robert N. Mefford, University of San Francisco, USA

http://repository.usfca.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1010&context=fe

 

 

International Supply Chains and Trade Elasticity in Times of Global Crisis

Click to access ersd201008_e.pdf

 

 

GLOBAL SUPPLY CHAINS: TRADE AND ECONOMIC POLICIES FOR DEVELOPING COUNTRIES

Alessandro Nicita Victor Ognivtsev Miho Shirotori

 

Click to access itcdtab56_en.pdf

 

 

The Great Trade Collapse: Shock Amplifiers and Absorbers in Global Value Chains

Zhengqi Pan

June 2016

 

Click to access Zhengqi%20Pan_GPN2016_008.pdf

 

 

The Age of Global Value Chains: Maps and Policy Issues

 

Click to access JACB201530.pdf

 

 

Asia and Global Production Networks Implications for Trade, Incomes and Economic Vulnerability

 

Click to access asia-and-global-production-networks.pdf

 

 

Mapping globaL Value Chains

Koen De Backer and Sébastien Miroudot

2014

Click to access ecbwp1677.pdf

 

 

Mapping Global Value Chains:

Intermediate Goods Trade and Structural Change in the World Economy

Timothy J. Sturgeon

Olga Memedovic

2011

 

Click to access WP%2005%20Mapping%20Glocal%20Value%20Chains.pdf

 

 

 

World Investment Report 2013:

Global Value Chains: Investment and Trade for Development

2013

 

Click to access wir2013_en.pdf

 

 

Trade finance: developments and issues

Report submitted by a Study Group established by the Committee on the Global Financial System

The Group was chaired by John J Clark, Federal Reserve Bank of New York

January 2014

 

Click to access cgfs50.pdf

 

 

East Asian Value Chains and the Global Financial Crisis

Genet Zinabou

2010

Click to access FR4-14-8-2010-eng.pdf

 

 

The collapse of global trade, murky protectionism, Recommendations for the G20

and the crisis

 

Edited by: Richard Baldwin and Simon Evenett

2009

Click to access 2009-03-murky-protectionism.pdf

 

 

Production Sharing in East Asia: Who Does What for Whom and Why?

 

Francis Ng and Alexander Yeats

1999

 

Click to access multi-page.pdf

 

 

PRODUCTION SHARING IN EAST ASIA: CHINA’S POSITION, TRADE PATTERN AND TECHNOLOGY UPGRADING

Laike Yang

 

Click to access gdsmdp20152yang_en.pdf

 

 

GLOBAL VALUE CHAINS SURVEYING DRIVERS AND MEASURES

João Amador and Sónia Cabral

2014

 

Click to access ecbwp1739.en.pdf

 

 

A New Measurement for International Fragmentation of the Production Process: An International Input-Output Approach

Satoshi Inomata

October 2008

 

Click to access 175.pdf

 

 

GLOBAL VALUE CHAINS IN A POSTCRISIS WORLD

A DEVELOPMENT PERSPECTIVE

Olivier Cattaneo, Gary Gereffi, and Cornelia Staritz Editors

 

http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.364.8729&rep=rep1&type=pdf#page=97

 

 

THE NATURE AND GROWTH OF VERTICAL SPECIALIZATION IN WORLD TRADE

David Hummels Jun Ishii Kei-Mu Yi

March 1999

 

Click to access sr72.pdf

 

 

TRADE INTEGRATION IN EAST ASIA:
THE ROLE OF CHINA AND PRODUCTION NETWORKS

MONA HADDAD

2007

Click to access wps4160.pdf

 

 

Production Networks and Trade Patterns in East Asia: Regionalization or Globalization?

Prema-chandra Athukorala

No. 56 | August 2010

Click to access wp56-trade-patterns-east-asia.pdf

 

 

Trade Integration and Production Network in East Asia

Pornnapa Leelapornchai

August 2007

 

Click to access Pornnapa.pdf

 

 

Trade patterns and global value chains in East Asia:
From trade in goods to trade in tasks

 

Click to access stat_tradepat_globvalchains_e.pdf

 

 

Global production sharing and trade patterns in East Asia

Prema-chandra Athukorala

June 2013

Click to access TU_VIROT,%20Ali_Reading2_Global%20Production%20Sharing%20and%20Trade%20Patterns%20in%20East%20Asia.pdf

 

 

Global Production Networks in Electronics and Intra-Asian Trade

Byron Gangnes

Ari Van Assche

2010

 

Click to access WP_2010-4.pdf

 

 

The Role of China, Japan, and Korea in Machinery Production Networks

Ayako OBASHI†

Fukunari KIMURA

March 2016

 

Click to access ERIA-DP-2016-10.pdf

 

 

China’s evolving role in global production networks: the decoupling debate revisited

Prema-chandra Athukorala

John Ravenhill

 

Click to access 2016-12_athukorala_ravenhill_wp_june_2016.pdf

 

 

International Production Networks And Changing Trade Patterns In East Asia: The Case Of The Electronics Industry

Dieter Ernst & Paolo Guerrieri

May 1997

Click to access 19970007.pdf

 

 

UNDERSTANDING THE WORLD TRADE COLLAPSE

Calista Cheung and Stéphanie Guichard

2009

http://www.oecd.org/officialdocuments/publicdisplaydocumentpdf/?doclanguage=en&cote=eco/wkp(2009)70

 

 

GLOBAL TRADE: WHAT’S BEHIND THE SLOWDOWN?

IMF World Economic Outlook Report October 2016

 

Click to access c2.pdf

 

 

A Theory of Domestic and International Trade Finance

JaeBin Ahn

2011

Click to access 0c96052274d4abea86000000.pdf

 

 

The Great Trade Collapse: Causes, Consequences and Prospects

 

Edited by Richard Baldwin

2009

 

Click to access great_trade_collapse.pdf

 

 

Understanding the Weakness in World Trade

2015

 

Click to access eb201503_article01.en.pdf

 

 

The mystery of the missing world trade growth after the global financial crisis

Hanna armelius, Carl-JoHan Belfrage and Hanna stenBaCka

2014

 

Click to access rap_pov_artikel_1_141121_eng.pdf

 

 

Resilient to the crisis? Global supply chains and trade flows

Carlo Altomonte, Gianmarco Ottaviano

27 November 2009

http://voxeu.org/article/resilient-crisis-global-supply-chains-and-trade-flows

 

 

The great trade collapse: What caused it and what does it mean?

Richard Baldwin

27 November 2009

 

 

The Collapse of International Trade During the 2008-2009 Crisis: In Search of the Smoking Gun

Andrei A. Levchenko

Logan T. Lewis

Linda L. Tesar

2009

 

 

Off the Clif  and Back? Credit Conditions and International Trade during the Global Financial Crisis

Davin Chory

Kalina Manova

This version: December 2009

 

 

WHY THE WORLD SUDDENLY CARES ABOUT GLOBAL SUPPLY CHAINS

GARY GEREFFI AND JOONKOO LEE

2012

 

 

China’s Slowdown: The First Stage of the Bullwhip Effect

Yossi Sheffi

September 09, 2015

 

 

Financial Crisis and Supply-Chain Financing

Leora Klapper and Douglas Randall

 

 

The mystery of the missing world trade growth after the global financial crisis

Hanna Armelius, Carl-Johan Belfrage and Hanna Stenbacka

2014

 

 

Trade Collapse, Trade Relapse and Global Production Networks: Supply Chains in the Great Recession

Escaith, Hubert

OECD, DEFI, WTO

28. October 2009

 

 

SPIDERS AND SNAKES: OFFSHORING AND AGGLOMERATION IN THE GLOBAL ECONOMY

Richard Baldwin Anthony Venables

Working Paper 16611

2010

 

 

 

GLOBAL VALUE CHAINS IN A POSTCRISIS WORLD A DEVELOPMENT PERSPECTIVE

Olivier Cattaneo, Gary Gereffi, and Cornelia Staritz

2010

 

 

Accounting relations in bilateral value added trade

Robert Stehrer

2013

 

Click to access wiod14.pdf

 

 

NETWORKS OF VALUE ADDED TRADE

Working Papers 2015

João Amador | Sónia Cabral

 

 

Trade patterns and global value chains in East Asia: From trade in goods to trade in tasks

WTO Report

 

 

Counting borders in global value chains

Kirill Muradov:

May 2016

 

 

Using Average Propagation Lengths to Identify Production Chains in the Andalusian Economy

ERIK DIETZENBACHER*, ISIDORO ROMERO LUNA** AND NIELS S. BOSMA

2005

https://idus.us.es/xmlui/bitstream/handle/11441/17372/file_1.pdf?sequence=1

 

 

Trade in Value Added: An East Asian Perspective

Satoshi Inomata

No. 451 December 2013

 

Click to access adbi-wp451.pdf

 

 

TRADE INTERCONNECTEDNESS: THE WORLD WITH GLOBAL VALUE CHAINS

2013

 

 

The globalisation of inflation: the growing importance of global value chains

by Raphael Auer, Claudio Borio and Andrew Filardo

 

 

 

 

GLOBAL MULTIREGIONAL INPUT–OUTPUT FRAMEWORKS: AN INTRODUCTION AND OUTLOOK

Arnold Tukker a b & Erik Dietzenbacher

2013

Click to access UNSD%20-%20Tukker%20-%20Overview%20on%20International%20IO%20Tables%20-%202013.pdf